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SM U-17 (Germany)
U-Boote Kiel 1914
U-17 (second row, second from the right), Kiel Harbour, February 1914
Career (Germany) War Ensign of Germany (1903–1919).svg
Name: U-17
Ordered: 10 May 1910
Builder: Kaiserliche Werft Danzig
Cost: 2,333,000 Goldmark
Yard number: 11
Laid down: 1 October 1910
Launched: 16 April 1912
Commissioned: 3 November 1912
Struck: 27 January 1919
Fate: Struck 27 January 1919, scrapped at Imperial Dockyard, Kiel. Pressure hull sold to Stinnes, Hamburg on 3 February 1920.
General characteristics
Class & type: German Type U 17 submarine
Displacement: 564 t (622 short tons) ↑
691 t (762 short tons) ↓
Length: 62.35 m (204 ft 7 in)
Beam: 6 m (19 ft 8 in)
Height: 7.30 m (23 ft 11 in)
Draught: 3.40 m (11 ft 2 in)
Propulsion: 2 shafts
2 × 2 Körting 8-cylinder two stroke paraffin motors with 1,400 PS (1,400 hp)
2 × AEG electric motors with 1,120 PS (1,100 hp)
550 rpm ↑
425 rpm ↓
Speed: 14.9 knots (27.6 km/h) ↑
9.5 knots (17.6 km/h) ↓
Range: 6,700 nautical miles (7,700 mi; 12,400 km) @ 8 kn ↑
75 nautical miles (86 mi; 139 km) @ 5 kn ↓
Test depth: 50 m (164 ft 1 in)
Boats & landing
craft carried:
1 dingi
Complement: 4 officers, 25 men
Armament: 4 x 45 cm (17.7 in) torpedo tubes (2 each bow and stern) with 6 torpedoes
1 × 5 cm (2.0 in) SK L/40 gun
1 x 3.7 cm (1.5 in) Hotchkiss gun
Service record
Part of: Imperial German Navy Baltic Flotilla,
II Flotilla,
Training Flotilla
Commanders: Johannes Feldkirchener 1 August 19147 March 1915,
Hans Walther 8 March 19159 January 1916
Operations: 4 patrols
Victories: 12 ships sunk for a total of 16,550 GRT; 1 ship captured for a total of 3,538 GRT.
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SM U-17 was a German submarine during World War I. U-17 sank the first British merchant vessel in the First World War, and also sank another nine ships and captured one ship, surviving the war without casualty.

War serviceEdit

Feldkirchener

Oberleutnant z.S. Feldkirchener

On 1 August 1914, Oberleutnant zur See Johannes Feldkirchener was given command of U-17.[1] On 20 October, U-17 stopped the 866 ton SS Glitra off the Norwegian coast, and having searched her cargo, ordered the crew to the lifeboats before scuttling the vessel. On 26 October, U-17 torpedoed the French ferry SS Admiral Ganteaume in the Strait of Dover. The vessel made port before sinking, with the loss of 40 lives out of over 2,500 on board.[2]

On 2 March 1915 the command of U-17 passed to Kapitänleutnant Hans Walther. On 12 June 1915, U-17 chased and torpedoed the SS Desabla off the coast of Scotland. The crew escaped on lifeboats while the vessel was scuttled and sunk. Walther's command ended on 9 January 1916 and the next day U-17 joined the Training Flotilla.[1]

Post warEdit

U-17 was decommissioned on 27 January 1919 and sold for scrapping.

NotesEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Spindler, Arno (1932,1933,1934,1941/1964,1966). Der Handelskrieg mit U-Booten. 5 Vols. Berlin: Mittler & Sohn. Vols. 4+5, dealing with 1917+18, are very hard to find: Guildhall Library, London, has them all, also Vol. 1-3 in an English translation: The submarine war against commerce. 
  • Beesly, Patrick (1982). Room 40: British Naval Intelligence 1914-1918. London: H Hamilton. ISBN 978-0-241-10864-2. 
  • Halpern, Paul G. (1917). A Naval History of World War I. New York: Routledge. ISBN 978-1-85728-498-0. 
  • Roessler, Eberhard (1997). Die Unterseeboote der Kaiserlichen Marine. Bonn: Bernard & Graefe. ISBN 978-3-7637-5963-7. 
  • Schroeder, Joachim (2002). Die U-Boote des Kaisers. Bonn: Bernard & Graefe. ISBN 978-3-7637-6235-4. 
  • Koerver, Hans Joachim (2008). Room 40: German Naval Warfare 1914-1918. Vol I., The Fleet in Action. Steinbach: LIS Reinisch. ISBN 978-3-902433-76-3. 
  • Koerver, Hans Joachim (2009). Room 40: German Naval Warfare 1914-1918. Vol II., The Fleet in Being. Steinbach: LIS Reinisch. ISBN 978-3-902433-77-0. 

External linksEdit



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