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The keep, one of the yagura, and the corridor that connects them

Ōzu Castle (大洲城 Ōzu-jō?), also known as Jizōgatake Castle (地蔵ヶ嶽城 Jizō-ga-take-jō?), is a castle located in Ōzu, Ehime Prefecture, Japan. It was originally constructed in 1331 by Utsunomiya Toyofusa. In 1888 the keep (天守 tenshu?) of the castle was destroyed, but it was re-constructed in 2004.

History[edit | edit source]

Ōzu Castle was constructed in 1331 by Utsunomiya Toyofusa. However, the structure that stands now was built sometime between 1585–1617. During this period, the castle was controlled by a number of lords, including Wakisaka Yasuharu, Kobayakawa Takakage, Tōdō Takatora, and Toda Katsutaka. In 1617, the castle was occupied by Katō Sadayasu and, until the Meiji Restoration, the castle remained under control of the Katō clan. In 1888 the keep was destroyed by a fire, though the two yagura, or towers, that were connected by corridors to the keep were saved. What remained of the castle survived World War II, even though the surrounding castle town was firebombed. In 2004 the keep was re-constructed, along with the corridors that connected the keep to the yagura. A small museum about the history of the castle is housed in the keep and yagura.[1]

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Turnbull, Steven (2003). Japanese Castles 1540-1640 (Fortress). Osprey Publishing. ISBN 978-1-84176-429-0. 
  • Motoo, Hinago (1986). Japanese Castles. Tokyo: Kodansha. pp. 200 pages. ISBN 0-87011-766-1. 

External links[edit | edit source]

Coordinates: 33°30′34″N 132°32′28″E / 33.509539°N 132.541131°E / 33.509539; 132.541131

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