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112th Field Artillery Regiment
Coat of arms
Country United States
Branch New Jersey Army National Guard
Type Field artillery
Nickname(s) FIRST NEW JERSEY ARTILLERY [1]
Patron Saint Barbara
Motto(s) "A Outrance" (To The Utmost)
Commanders
Current
commander
Joel L. Martin
CSM Earnest Williams
Insignia
Distinctive unit insignia 112FARegtDUI.jpg

The 112th Field Artillery Regiment is a Field Artillery Branch regiment of the New Jersey Army National Guard whose antecedents were first formed in April 1917.

It currently comprises only 3rd Battalion, 112th Field Artillery Regiment.[2]

History[edit | edit source]

The tradition of militia service in New Jersey goes back to the day before the Revolutionary War, thus giving the New Jersey National Guard a history which spans nearly 229 years of civilian soldier service.

In 1664, what is now the State of New Jersey, was granted by King Charles of England to his brother, the Duke of York, who in turn conveyed it to Lord Berkley and Sir George Carteret. In 1665, Sir Philip Carteret, son of Sir George, was Governor and on 1 July 1665, he divided the land grant into two Provinces, East and West Jersey. West Jersey was originally set off into counties as follows: Cape May, 12 November 1692; Burlington, Gloucester and Salem, 17 May 1694. Cumberland was set off from Salem County 19 January 1748. Camden County was set off from Gloucester County in 1844.

In the early days the militia was organized along county lines. New Jersey's County Militia responded to every state and federal call during the Revolutionary War, and served with distinction from Canada to Virginia. They fought in the battle of Ticonderoga, Princeton, Trenton, Red Bank, Assunpink, Monmouth, Germantown, Springfield, Paules Hook and others including the final engagement at Yorktown. Officers and enlisted men of this artillery served in General Knox's Brigade of artillery during the revolutionary war.

The First Battalion 112th Field Artillery can trace its beginnings back to the 13th of February 1776 when the Provincial Congress of New Jersey authorized the raising of two companies of artillery. One was to be in the Eastern Division of the Province and the other in the Western Division. The West Jersey Company of Artillery was organized by Captain Samuel Hugg, which consisted of four (4) officers and sixty (60) enlisted men.[3]

  • REVOLUTIONARY WAR

The most prominent military characters of the county of Gloucester at the commencement of the War of the Revolution were Colonels Joseph Ellis, Josiah Hillman, Joseph Hugg and Robert Brown, Major William Ellis, Captains Samuel Hugg, John Stokes and John Davis.

Colonel Ellis had commanded a company of Canada men in the French and Indian War, but on the opening of the issue between the mother-country and the colonies he resigned the commission he held of the King and was made a Colonel in the Gloucester militia. He was in the battle of Monmouth and several other engagements, in all of which he fought bravely.

Colonel Hillman was esteemed a good officer and saw much service.

Colonel Hugg was appointed commissary of purchase for West Jersey at an early stage of the war, and in the capacity did much for the cause. He was in the battles of Germantown, Shorthills and Monmouth; and when the British crossed from Philadelphia to New York he was detailed to drive away the stock along their line of March, in performing this duty he had many narrow escapes from the enemy's light horse.

Colonel Brown lived at Swedesboro, and his regiment was chiefly employed in preventing the enemy from landing from their ships and restraining the excursions of the refugees from Billingsport. Captain Samuel Hugg and Frederick Frelinghuysen were appointed by an act of the Legislature to command the first two companies of artillery raised in New Jersey. Captain Hugg in the Western and Captain Frelinghuysen in the Eastern Division. The former soon raised his company, and in it were a number of young men of fortune and the first families in the State, the Westcoats, Elmers, Seeleys and others, men who afterwards occupied distinguished posts in the local and national governments. This company was at the battles of Trenton and Princeton. When the “Roebuck,” (44) was engaged in protecting the operations against the chevaux-de-frise at Billingsport, NJ, Captain Hugg's artillerists threw up a small breastwork on the Jersey shore. Fought here during the whole day but unfortunately their first sergeant, William Ellis was killed by a cannonball that took off both his legs above the knees. This Ellis was an Englishman and had been for several years a recruiting officer for the British service in Philadelphia. He joined the American cause early --- like his namesake, was a very brave man --- and died much regretted by this companions-in-arms.

The “great” victory at Trenton and the one that followed at Princeton involved troops from Salem and Cumberland Counties, as well as the West Jersey Artillery under the command of Captain Samuel Hugg of “Old Gloucester County” to the displeasure in Great Britain.

In addition to the South Jersey Militia companies, which served at Woodbury and the area south to Mantua Creek during the months of October and November 1777, one of the most important units was the West Jersey Artillery, commanded by Captain Samuel Hugg of Gloucester City. Men came from most of the South Jersey Counties and served under Captain Hugg and it was found that the following men were present and probably formed the Battery near Mantua Creek which harassed British warships.

Lt. Benjamin Whitall Sgt Samuel Cole Sgt George Sparks Private McCalory Adams Private Joseph Flint Private Levi Albertson Private Joah Garrison Private John Barber Private Thomas Goren Private George Barnett Private Benjamin Haines Private William Barrot Private Judiah Haines Private Joseph Bennett Private Thomas Heath Private John Booten Private James Horne Private James Bright Private Joseph Hugg Private John Brown Private William Johnston Private David Cahill Private Thomas Langeley Private John Cahill Private Daniel Laurance Private John Cann Private Thomas Legrange Private John Carlile Private Joseph Lummis Private Michale Christian Private Parson Lummis Private Richard Colyer Private Magree Private Andrew Cross Private Arthur McGinies Private Ephraim Dayton Private Matthew Parvin Private David Diskell Private Andrew Peck Private Nathaniel Diskell Private Philip Peters Private Lawrence Doerir Private Nathaniel Price Private Matthew Dugan Private Elijah Price Private James Dunwoody Private William Rawlins Private Joseph Reve Private Job Ryley Private Thomas Smith Private John Telford

The artillery unit was specifically cited for its participation in engagements at Quinton's Bridge on the 18th of March 1778, and again at Hancock's Bridge on the 21st of March 1778, under the command of Captain Seth Bowen.

The Company was again mentioned for its participation in the expedition against the Indians in 1791 when it accompanied Major Thomas Paterson's Battalion on its march to the Western frontier of the new nation.

Indented line
  • WHISKEY REBELLION PA - 1794

On 23 August 1794, Governor Richard Howell of New Jersey, under authority of President George Washington, ordered into active service of the United States for three months, a Detachment of New Jersey Militia which included Infantry, Cavalry, and two Companies of Artillery. They were mustered on the 20th of September 1794. Captain Eli Elmer commenced their march into Pennsylvania on the 22nd of September 1794 to accompany Brigadier General Bloomfield's Brigade to put down an insurrection, which was known as the “Whisky Rebellion” in the Western region of Pennsylvania.

During the War with Great Britain, 1812 to 1815 the State of New Jersey in response to calls from President Madison furnished detachments from the state militia, usually for periods of six months, for defense of our coasts and coastal installation.

Indented line
  • WAR OF 1812-1815

Aaron Ogden, Governor of New Jersey, issued his proclamation calling for volunteers to garrison fortifications and for coast defense. In answer to this call, Gloucester County responded with eleven full compaines of troops, eight were attached to Brigadier General Ebenezer Elmer's brigade of detailed milita. The “West Jersey Company of Artillery”, from Cumberland County answered the call to arms under the command of Captain Sheppard Gandy. In September 1814 from Gloucester County Captain Enoch Gabb's Company of Artillery answered the call to arms, attached to Lieutenant Colonel Joshua L. Howell's Regiment of Infantry stationed at Billingsport, New Jersey. They were enrolled the 26th of September 1814, and discharged 22 December 1814, according to original rolls, now in the Office of the Adjutant General, Department of Defense, Trenton Library, NJ. Two full companies – one of Infantry and the other of Artillery – were assigned to the defense of the sea-coast from New York to Cape May, and as occasion demanded, were detached to protect any and all points along the sea-coast.

The territory embraced in Atlantic and Cape May Counties, since taken from Gloucester, sent out its quota of volunteers who took a prominent part in inland and coast protection, and as all the troops herein appended were accredited to Gloucester County, it is impossible to collect and assign the troops to the several counties, as upon the original rolls, now in the Office of the Adjutant General in Trenton, NJ, each and all the companies are mentioned only as from Gloucester County. In view of the fact that Camden County in 1844 was formed from certain townships of Gloucester County, Battery “B” may be assumed to be the successor of Gabb's Company of Artillery.

The territory embraced in Atlantic and Cape May Counties, since taken from Gloucester, sent out its quota of volunteers who took a prominent part in inland and coast protection, and as all the troops herein appended were accredited to Gloucester County, it is impossible to collect and assign the troops to the several counties, as upon the original rolls, now in the Office of the Adjutant General in Trenton, NJ, each and all the companies are mentioned only as from Gloucester County. In view of the fact that Camden County in 1844 was formed from certain townships of Gloucester County, Battery “B” may be assumed to be the successor of Gabb's Company of Artillery.


  • MEXICAN WAR – 1846-1848

Americans crowded so rapidly into the new republic of Texas that there could be no question but that its future was destined to be united with that from which it had drawn its people and its institutions, and notwithstanding that the Senate in 1844 rejected the annexation treaty negotiated by President Tyler, a year later it and the House of Representatives were ready to favorably answer the petition of Texas.

Mexico officially announced that she regarded this as an act of war, and by taking up arms sacrificed forever her claim upon Texas, and was eventually compelled to confirm the conquests of Colonel Philip Kearny and Colonel John C. Fremont in New Mexico and Upper California by the session of those regions to the United States.

A quota of troops, which the national government required the State to furnish, was filled without difficulty, and was forwarded to Mexico in time to join in General Taylor's victories in 1846 and 1847, at Palo Alto, Resaca de la Palma, Monterey, Saltillo and Buena Vista. Then they joined the army under Scott, to the triumphs at Vera Cruz, Cerro Gordo, Perote, Contreras, San Antonio, Molino del Rey, Cherubusco, Chapultepec and the City of Mexico.

The Jersey commands participating in these marvelous campaigns were all, with one exception, mustered at Trenton into the regular army; and, therefore, no record was kept of the place of their organization, or of the residence of individual recruits. Circumstances indicate that most of the men who went from Camden County were mustered into the Tenth Regiment United States Infantry. A call was made on Governor Charles C. Stratton, of New Jersey, on May 23, 1846, for a regiment of volunteer infantry, and in response to his proclamation a number of companies were offered from Camden County.

  • Federally Organized 3 April 1917 in the New Jersey National Guard from new and existing units as the 1st Battalion, Field Artillery, with Headquarters at Camden
  • Expanded, reorganized, and redesignated 17 July 1917 as the 1st Field Artillery Drafted into Federal service 5 August 1917
  • Reorganized and redesignated 15 September 1917 as the 110th Field Artillery and assigned to the 29th Division
  • Redesignated 27 September 1917 as the 112th Field Artillery and remained assigned to the 29th Division
  • Demobilized 31 May 1919 at Camp Dix, New Jersey
  • Reorganized 1920–1921 in the New Jersey National Guard as the 1st Battalion, Field Artillery; Headquarters Federally recognized 27 June 1921 at East Orange
  • Expanded, reorganized, and redesignated 20 April 1922 as the 112th Field Artillery and assigned to the 44th Division; Headquarters Federally recognized 8 January 1924 at Camden. Location of Headquarters changed 10 May 1929 to Trenton.
  • Relieved 1 December 1939 from assignment to the 44th Division (1st Battalion concurrently redesignated as the 1st Battalion, 165th Field Artillery, an element of the 44th Division-see ANNEX 2; new 1st Battalion concurrently organized from the former 1st Battalion, 165th Field Artillery [organized and Federally recognized 15 November 1939 in the New Jersey National Guard with Headquarters at Morristown])
  • Inducted into Federal service 27 January 1941 at home stations
  • Regiment broken up 1 May 1943 and its elements reorganized and redesignated as follows:
  • Headquarters and the 1st Battalion as the 695th Field Artillery Battalion 2d Battalion as the 696th Field Artillery Battalion (Headquarters Battery as Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 112th Field Artillery Group - hereafter separate lineage)
  • After 1 May 1943 the above units underwent changes as follows: 695th Field Artillery Battalion reorganized and redesignated 26 August 1943 as the 695th Armored Field Artillery Battalion Inactivated 2 November 1945 at Camp Myles Standish, Massachusetts Reorganized and Federally recognized 17 December 1946 with Headquarters at Morristown
  • 696th Field Artillery Battalion reorganized and redesignated 26 August 1943 as the 696th Armored Field Artillery Battalion
  • Inactivated 27 October 1945 at Camp Patrick Henry, Virginia
  • Reorganized and Federally recognized 24 September 1946 with Headquarters at Trenton
  • Ordered into active Federal service 3 September 1950 at home stations
  • (695th Armored Field Artillery Battalion [NGUS] organized and Federally recognized 10 November 1952 with Headquarters at Morristown
  • Released 17 December 1954 from active Federal service and reverted to state control; Federal recognition concurrently withdrawn from the 695th Armored Field Artillery Battalion [NGUS]
  • 695th and 696th Armored Field Artillery Battalions consolidated 1 March 1959 with the 228th (see ANNEX 1), 199th (see ANNEX 2), 157th (see ANNEX 3), and 286th (see ANNEX 4) Armored Field Artillery Battalions to form the 112th Artillery, a parent regiment under the Combat Arms Regimental System, to consist of the 1st, 2d, and 3d Howitzer Battalions and the 4th Rocket Howitzer Battalion, elements of the 50th Armored Division, and the 5th and 6th Howitzer Battalions
  • Reorganized 31 January 1963 to consist of the 1st, 2d, 3d, 4th, and 6th Battalions, elements of the 50th Armored Division, and the 5th Howitzer Battalion
  • Reorganized 15 March 1966 to consist of the 1st, 2d, 3d, 4th, and 6th Battalions, elements of the 50th Armored Division, the 5th Howitzer Battalion, and the 7th Battalion
  • Reorganized 1 February 1968 to consist of the 3d, 4th, and 6th Battalions, elements of the 50th Armored Division, and the 1st, 5th, and 7th Battalions
  • Reorganized 1 December 1971 to consist of the 3d, 4th, and 6th Field Artillery Battalions, elements of the 50th Armored Division, and the 1st, 5th, and 7th Battalions
  • Reorganized in April 1972 to consist of the 3d, 4th, and 6th Field Artillery Battalions, elements of the 50th Armored Division, and the 1st and 5th Battalions
  • Redesignated 1 May 1972 as the 112th Field Artillery
  • Reorganized 1 May 1975 to consist of the 3d and 4th Battalions, elements of the 50th Armored Division, and the 1st and 5th Battalions
  • Reorganized 1 July.1975 to consist of the 1st, 3d, 4th, and 5th Battalions, elements of the 50th Armored Division
  • Reorganized 1 May 1980 to consist of the 1st, 3d, and 4th Battalions, elements of the 50th Armored Division
  • Withdrawn 1 June 1989 from the Combat Arms Regimental System and reorganized under the United States Army Regimental System
  • Reorganized 1 September 1991 to consist of the 1st and 3d Battalions, elements of the 50th Armored Division
  • Reorganized 1 September 1993 to consist of the 1st and 3d Battalions, elements of the 42d Infantry Division
  • Reorganized 1 September 1997 to consist of the 3d Battalion and Battery D, elements of the 42d Infantry Division

Annex 1[edit | edit source]

  • 1st Battalion, 157th Field Artillery, inducted into Federal service 16 September 1940 at home stations Redesignated 20 February 1942 as the 1st Battalion, 228th Field Artillery, and relieved from assignment to the 44th Division
  • Reorganized and redesignated 1 March 1943 as the 228th Field Artillery Battalion Inactivated 27 October 1945 at Camp Myies Standish, Massachusetts
  • Redesignated 5 July 1946 as the 228th Armored Field Artillery Battalion and assigned to the 50th Armored Division
  • Reorganized and Federally recognized 31 October 1946 at Camden

Annex 2[edit | edit source]

  • 1st Battalion, 165th Field Artillery, inducted Into Federal service 16 September 1940 at home stations Reorganized and redesignated 20 February 1942 as the 199th Field Artillery Battalion and relieved from assignment to the 44th Division
  • Inactivated 23 October 1945 at Camp Shanks, New York
  • Redesignated 5 July 1946 as the 199th Armored Field Artillery Battalion and assigned to the 50th Armored Division
  • Reorganized and Federally recognized 26 November 1945 with Headquarters at East Orange

Annex 3[edit | edit source]

  • Organized and Federally recognized 8 June 1936 in the New Jersey National Guard as the 2d Battalion, 157th Field Artillery, an element of the 44th Division, with Hadquarters at Atlantic City Inducted into Federal service 16 September 1940 at home stations
  • Disbanded 7 January 1941 at Fort Dix, New Jersey
  • Reconstituted 25 August 1945 In the New Jersey National Guard as the 2d Battalion, 157th Field Artillery
  • Redesignated 9 July 1946 as the 157th Field Artillery Battalion
  • Reorganized and Federally recognized 12 February 1947 with Headquarters at Atlantic City
  • Reorganized and redesignated l October 1954 as the 157th Armored Field Artillery Battalion

Annex 4[edit | edit source]

  • Constituted 9 July 1946 in the New Jersey National Guard as the 308th Antiaircraft Artillery Searchlight Battalion Redesignated 1 December 1947 as the 308th Antiaircraft Artillery Gun Battalion
  • Organized and Federally recognized 9 January 1950 with Headquarters at Rio Grande
  • Redesignated l October 1953 as the 308th Antiaircraft Artillery Battalion
  • Converted and redesignated l February 1955 as the 286th Armored Field Artillery

Campaign participation credit[edit | edit source]

World War I[edit | edit source]

  • Streamer without inscription

World War II[edit | edit source]

  • Normandy;
  • Northern France;
  • Rhineland;
  • Ardennes-Alsace;
  • Central Europe

Headquarters Battery (Morristown) and Battery A (Morristown), 3d Battalion, each additionally entitled to:

World War I[edit | edit source]

  • Meuse-Argonne
  • Alsace 1918

Battery D (Camden Light Artillery, Cherry Hill) additionally entitled to:

Civil War[edit | edit source]

  • Bull Run
  • Wilderness
  • Spotsylvania
  • Cold Harbor
  • Petersburg
  • Shenandoah
  • Appomattox
  • Virginia 1863
  • Gettysburg

War on Terrorism: Campaigns to be determined

Decorations[edit | edit source]

  • Presidential Unit Citation (Army)
  • Streamer embroidered MOSELLE RIVER Headquarters Battery (Morristown) and Battery A (Morristown)

3d Battalion, each additionally entitled to:

  • Presidential Unit Citation (Army)
  • Streamer embroidered SCHALBACH Battery B (Lawrenceville)

3d Battalion, additionally entitled to:

  • French Croix de Guerre with Palm
  • World War II
  • Streamer embroidered MOSELLE RIVER

References[edit | edit source]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Hexamer

External links[edit | edit source]

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