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306th Infantry Regiment
Regimental Coat of Arms
Active 1917–1919
1921–1946
1946–1963
1999- present
Country  USA
Branch U.S. Army
Role Infantry
Size Regiment
Part of 188th Infantry Brigade
Garrison/HQ Fort Stewart, Georgia
Anniversaries Constituted 5 August 1917 in the National Army
Decorations Philippine Presidential Unit Citation
Presidential Unit Citation
Army Superior Unit Award
Battle honours World War I
World War II

The 306th Infantry Regiment was a National Army unit first organized for service in World War I as part of the 77th Infantry Division in Europe. It later served in the Pacific Theater during World War II. Since then it has served as a training Regiment. In 1999, it was withdrawn from the Combat Arms Regimental System and redesignated as a non-branch regiment. The regiment's 1st, 2nd, 4th, and 5th battalions are stationed at Fort Stewart under the command of the 188th Infantry Brigade. The 3rd Battalion is inactive.

History[edit | edit source]

World War I[edit | edit source]

77th Infantry Division.patch.jpg

The Regiment was constituted 5 August 1917 in the National Army as the 306th Infantry and assigned to the 153rd Infantry Brigade of the 77th Division. It was organized at Camp Upton, New York on 29 August 1917. The Regiment participated in the following campaigns: Oise-Aisne, Meuse-Argonne, Champagne, and Lorraine. The Regiment demobilized at Camp Upton on 9 May 1919.[1][2][3]

Between the Wars[edit | edit source]

77th Infantry Division.patch.jpg

The Regiment was reconstituted in the Organized Reserves as the 306th Infantry on 24 June 1921 and reassigned to the 77th Division (later redesignated as the 77th Infantry Division) within the II Corps area. It was actually organized in August 1921 with the entire Regiment located in New York, New York. The 306th conducted summer training most years with the 16th and 18th Infantry Regiments at Camp Dix, New Jersey, or Fort Slocum, New York, and some years with the 26th Infantry Regiment at Plattsburg Barracks, New York. The regiment also conducted infantry Citizens Military Training Camp (CMTC) training some years at Camp Dix and Plattsburg Barracks as an alternate form of summer training. The primary ROTC feeder schools were the College of the City of New York and New York University. The Regimental designated mobilization training station was Camp Jackson, South Carolina.[1]

World War II[edit | edit source]

77th Infantry Division.patch.jpg

Ordered into active military service 25 March 1942 and reorganized at Fort Jackson, South Carolina. The Regiment participated in the January 1943 Louisiana Maneuvers. In July 1943, the Regiment was organized with 3,256 Officers and enlisted men:[4]

The Regiment departed San Francisco on 23 March 1944 and arrived in Hawaii on 1 April. The 306th first saw combat during the liberation of Guam in July, 1944. The 306th served in the liberation of the Philippines, arriving on 23 November 1944. The regiment fought on Okinawa from 27 April though 27 June.[5][6][7]

Post War Service[edit | edit source]

77th Infantry Division.patch.jpg

Activated 17 December 1946 in the Organized Reserves with Headquarters in New York City. In May 1959 the Regiment was reorganized as a parent regiment under the Combat Arms Regimental System to consist of the 1st Battle Group, an element of the 77th Infantry Division under the Pentomic division design.[8] After adoption of the ROAD program,[9] the regiment was reorganized on 26 March 1963 to consist of the 1st and 2d Battalions, subordinate elements of the 77th Infantry Division. The 1st and 2d Battalions were inactivated 30 December 1965 and relieved from assignment to the 77th Infantry Division.[10]

Under the 87th Training Division[edit | edit source]

US 87th Infantry Division.svg

The 307th Infantry was withdrawn 17 October 1999 from the Combat Arms Regimental System, redesignated as the 307th Regiment, and reorganized to consist of the 1st, 2d, and 3d Battalions, elements of the 87th Division (Training Support).[11] The 1st, 2d, and 3d Battalions were concurrently allotted to the Regular Army.

Transfer to First Army[edit | edit source]

1st Army.svg

On 15 December 2007, the battalions were relieved from their assignment to the 87th Division and reassigned to First Army’s 188th Infantry Brigade. In October 2012, 3rd Battalion was inactivated. In 2016, the 4th and 5th Battalions were activated at Fort Stewart.

Lineage & Honors[12][edit | edit source]

Lineage[edit | edit source]

Campaign Participation Credit[edit | edit source]

Conflict Streamer Year(s)
World War I
Streamer WWI V.PNG
Oise-Aisne 1917
Meuse-Argonne 1917
Champagne 1918
Lorraine 1918
World War II
Streamer APC.PNG
Streamer WWII V.PNG
Western Pacific
Leyte (with Arrowhead) 1944
Ryukyus(with Arrowhead) 1945

Decorations[edit | edit source]

Ribbon Award Element Inscription Orders
Streamer PUC Army.PNG Presidential Unit Citation 1st Battalion Ie Shima War Department General Orders
Streamer PUC Army.PNG Presidential Unit Citation 3rd Battalion Okinowa War Department General Orders
Presidential Unit Citation (Philippines) Streamer.png Philippine Republic Presidential Unit Citation Entire Regiment 17 OCTOBER 1944 TO 4 JULY 1945 War Department General Orders
Streamer SUC.png Army Superior Unit Award 1st & 2nd Battalions 2008-2011 File:332-07 20121127 HRCMD CC.pdf

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 US Army Order of Battle 1919-1941 p454
  2. Order of battle for the 77th Infantry Division in World War I
  3. 77th Division Order of Battle in World War I
  4. Maneuver and Firepower p183
  5. Order of Battle for 77th ID in WW2
  6. Additional footage
  7. Stanton, Shelby L. (1984). World War II Order of Battle. New York, New York: Galahad Books.
  8. Maneuver and Firepower p270
  9. Wilson, John B. (1997). Maneuver and Firepower: The Evolution of Divisions and Separate Brigades. Washington, DC: Center of Military History.
  10. Maneuver and Firepower p329
  11. Maneuver and Firepower p424
  12. https://history.army.mil/html/forcestruc/lineages/branches/regt/0306rgt.htm Lineage and Honors Certificate

External links[edit | edit source]

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