FANDOM

278,228 Pages

32d Air Division
USAF 32d Air Division Crest.jpg
Emblem of the 32d Air Division
Active 1949–1969
Country United States
Branch United States Air Force
Role Command and Control
Part of Air Defense Command
32dAD - Map - 1949-1963

32d Air Division AOR 1949-1963

32dAD - Map - 1966-1969

32d Air Division AOR 1966-1969

27th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron Lockheed F-94C-1-LO Starfire 51-13555

27th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron Lockheed F-94C-1-LO Starfire 51-13555 Griffiss AFB, New York, 1954

319th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron F-104As 1958

F-104As of the 319th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron over Biscane Bay, Florida

The 32d Air Division (32d AD) is an inactive United States Air Force organization. Its last assignment was with Air Defense Command, assigned to First Air Force, being stationed at Gunter Air Force Base, Alabama. It was inactivated on 31 December 1969.

HistoryEdit

Assigned to Air Defense Command (ADC) for most of its existence, the 32d organized, administered, equipped, trained, and prepared for operation, all of its assigned units. The division participated in exercises such as Creek Brave, Top Rung and Natchez Echo. Initially, it assumed responsibility for an area including Maine, Vermont, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and part of New York. During the Cuban Missile Crisis (October 1962), the division controlled numerous deployments and aerial sorties.

Later, beginning in 1966, the area expanded to include Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and parts of South Carolina, Louisiana and Florida when it assumed responsibility for the mission of the inactivated Montgomery Air Defense Sector. Assumed additional designation of 32d NORAD Region after activation of the NORAD Combat Operations Center at Cheyenne Mountain, Colorado and reporting was transferred to NORAD from ADC at Ent AFB in April 1966.

Inactivated in November 1969 as ADC phased down its interceptor mission as the chances of a Soviet bomber attack on the United States seemed remote, its mission being consolidated into the 23d Air Division.

LineageEdit

  • Established as 32d Air Division (Defense) on 8 November 1949
Activated on 8 December 1949
Inactivated on 1 February 1952
  • Organized on 1 February 1952
Inactivated on 15 August 1958
  • Redesignated 32d Air Division (SAGE) on 21 October 1958
Activated on 15 November 1958
Discontinued, and inactivated, on 4 September 1963
  • Redesignated 32d NORAD Region/Air Division, and activated, on 20 January 1966
Organized on 1 April 1966, replacing Montgomery Air Defense Sector
Inactivated on 31 December 1969, assets transferred to 20th NORAD Region/Air Division.

AssignmentsEdit

StationsEdit

ComponentsEdit

SectorsEdit

Topsham AFS, Maine
Gunter AFS, Alabama
Inactivated and redesignated: 4752d Air Defense Wing
Richards-Gebaur AFB, Missouri

WingsEdit

Otis AFB, Massachusetts
Also known as: Syracuse Air Defense Sector
Syracuse Air Force Station, New York
Niagara Falls MAP, New York

Presque Isle AFB, Maine
Oklahoma City AFS, Oklahoma

GroupsEdit

Ethan Allen AFB, Vermont
Presque Isle AFB, Maine

Stewart AFB, New York, 1 January 1951 – 6 February 1952
Griffiss AFB, New York

Interceptor squadronsEdit

Griffiss AFB, New York
Hanscom Field, Massachusetts
Pinecastle AFB, Florida
Homestead AFB, Florida

Charleston AFB, South Carolina
Griffiss AFB, New York
Seymour-Johnson AFB, North Carolina

Radar squadronsEdit

Eufaula AFS, Alabama, 15 November 1958 – 1 November 1959; 1 April 1966 – 8 September 1968
Cherry Point Marine Corps Air Station, North Carolina, 1 December 1952 – 16 February 1953; 15 November 1958 – 1 July 1961
Crystal Springs AFS, Mississippi, 15 November 1958 – 1 November 1959; 1 April 1966 – 8 September 1968
Richmond AFS, Florida, 1 April 1966 – 14 November 1969
Patrick AFB, Florida, 1 April 1966 – 14 November 1969
Brunswick AFS, Maine, 6 February 1952 – 16 February 1956; 1 March 1956 – 15 August 1958
Watertown AFS, New York, 6 February 1952 – 16 February 1953; 1 March 1956 – 1 September 1958
Houma AFS, Louisiana, 15 November 1958 – 1 November 1959; 1 April 1966 – 14 November 1969
MacDill AFB, Florida, 15 November 1958 – 1 November 1959; 1 April 1966 – 14 November 1969
Lake City AFS, Tennessee, 15 November 1958 – 1 June 1961
Key West NAS, Florida, 1 April 1966 – 14 November 1969
Barrington AS, Nova Scotia, 1 December 1956 – 15 August 1958
Tyndall AFB, Florida, 1 April 1966 – 14 November 1969
Jacksonville NAS, Florida, 15 November 1958 – 1 November 1959; 1 April 1966 – 14 November 1969
Cross City AFS, Florida, 15 November 1958 – 1 November 1959; 1 April 1966 – 14 November 1969
Dauphin Island AFS, Alabama, 15 November 1958 – 1 November 1959; 1 April 1966 – 14 November 1969
Thomasville AFS, Alabama, 15 November 1958 – 1 November 1959; 1 April 1966 – 31 December 1969

Savannah AFS, Georgia, 1 April 1966 – 14 November 1969
North Truro AFS, Massachusetts, 6 February 1952 – 16 February 1953
Lockport AFS, New York, 6 February 1952 – 16 February 1953
Saint Albans AFS, Vermont, 1 March 1956 – 15 August 1958
Charleston AFS, Maine, 1 March 1956 – 15 August 1958
Caswell AFS, Maine, 1 March 1956 – 15 August 1958
Guthrie AFS, West Virginia, 15 November 1958 – 1 June 1961
Snow Mountain AFS, Kentucky, 15 November 1958 – 1 June 1961
North Charleston AFS, South Carolina, 1 November 24 December 1953; 15 November 1958 – 1 July 1961
Joelton AFS, Tennessee, 15 November 1958 – 1 June 1961
Winston-Salem AFS, North Carolina, 15 November 1958 – 1 July 1961
Aiken AFS, South Carolina, 15 November 1958 – 1 July 1961; 1 April 1966 – 14 November 1969
Flintstone AFS, Georgia, 15 November 1958 – 25 July 1960
Marietta AFS, Georgia, 15 November 1958 – 1 July 1961; 1 April 1966 – 8 September 1968
Lyndonville AFS, Vermont, 1 March 1956 – 15 August 1958
Ramore AS, Ontario, 10 March 1952 – 21 December 1952
Pagwa AS, Ontario, 10 March 1952 – 20 December 1952
Sioux Lookout AS, Ontario, 10 March 1952 – 16 December 1952
Beausejour AS, Manitoba, 12 February-1 December 1952

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates public domain material from the Air Force Historical Research Agency website http://www.afhra.af.mil/.

  • Winkler, David F. (1997), Searching the skies: the legacy of the United States Cold War defense radar program. Prepared for United States Air Force Headquarters Air Combat Command.
  • A Handbook of Aerospace Defense Organization 1946 - 1980, by Lloyd H. Cornett and Mildred W. Johnson, Office of History, Aerospace Defense Center, Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado
  • Aerospace Defense Command publication, The Interceptor, January 1979 (Volume 21, Number 1)
  • Air Force Historical Research Agency:32d Air Division

This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia (view authors).
Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.