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351st Infantry Regiment
351st Regiment Distinctive Unit Insignia.jpg
Regimental Distinctive Unit Insignia
Active 1917–1919
1921–1945
1946–present
Country Flag of the United States.svg USA
Branch U.S. Army
Role Infantry
Size Regiment
Part of First Army
Motto(s) TOUJOURS PRÊT (Always Ready)
Colors Blue and Silver
Anniversaries Constituted 5 August 1917 in the National Army
Decorations Croix de Guerre, Army Superior Unit Award
Battle honours World War I
World War II


The 351st Infantry Regiment was a National Army Infantry Regiment first organized for service in World War I as part of the 88th Infantry Division in Europe. It later served in the Mediterranean Theater during World War II. Since then it has served as a training Regiment, training Army Reserve and Army National Guard Soldiers for service in support of the Global War on Terror.[1][2]

Service historyEdit

World War I[3]Edit

88th Infantry Division SSI
The Regiment was constituted 5 August 1917 in the National Army as the 351st Infantry and assigned to the 176th Infantry Brigade of the 88th Division. It was organized at Camp Dodge, Iowa on 30 August 1917, and Herbert B. Crosby was named to command it. In August 1917, the Regiment was organized with 3,755 Officers and enlisted men:
  • Headquarters & Headquarters Company- 303
    • Supply Company- 140
    • Machine Gun Company- 178
    • Medical & Chaplain Detachment- 56
  • Infantry Battalion (x3)- 1,026
    • Headquarters- 2
    • Rifle Company (x4)- 256[4]

The Doughboys of the Regiment deployed to France as part of the American Expeditionary Forces .[5][6][7] After completing its war service in France it demobilized at Camp Dodge on 7 June 1919.[8]

Between the WarsEdit

88th Infantry Division SSI
The Regiment was reconstituted in the Organized Reserves as the 351st Infantry on 24 June 1921 and reassigned to the 88th Division (later redesignated as the 88th Infantry Division) in the Sixth Corps Area.[9][10]

World War II[11]Edit

88th Infantry Division SSI

The Regiment was ordered into active military service 15 July 1942 and reorganized at Camp Gruber, Oklahoma using a cadre provided by the 9th Infantry Division.[12] The Regiment participated in the Louisiana Maneuvers in June through August 1943. The Regiment departed Camp Patrick Henry on 4 November 1943 through the Hampton Roads Port of Embarkation as Shipment 8629-H. In July 1943, the Regiment was organized with 3,256 Officers and enlisted men:[13]

  • Headquarters & Headquarters Company- 111
    • Service Company- 114
    • Anti-Tank Company- 165
    • Cannon Company- 118
    • Medical Detachment- 135
  • Infantry Battalion (x3)- 871
    • Headquarters & Headquarters Company- 126
    • Rifle Company (x3)- 193
    • Weapons Company- 156

Trieste United States TroopsEdit

Trieste United States Troops shoulder patch

The 351st Infantry was relieved from assignment to the division on 1 May 1947 and served as temporary military Government of the Free Territory of Trieste, securing the new independent State[14] between Italy and Yugoslavia on behalf of the United Nations Security Council.[15] Designated TRUST (Trieste United States Troops), the command served as the front line in the Cold War from 1947 to 1954, including confrontations with Yugoslavian forces. In October 1954 the mission ended upon the signing of the Memorandum of Understanding of London [16] establishing a temporary civil administration in the Anglo-American Zone of the Free Territory of Trieste, entrusted to the responsibility of the Italian Government.[17] TRUST units, which included a number of 88th divisional support units, all bore a unit patch which was the coat of arms of the Free Territory of Trieste superimposed over the divisional quatrefoil, over which was a blue scroll containing the designation "TRUST" in white. The 1948 organization of the Regiment called for a strength of 3,774 Officers and enlisted men organized as below:

  • Headquarters & Headquarters Company- 289
    • Service Company- 186
    • Tank Company- 148
    • Heavy Mortar Company- 190
    • Medical Company- 214
  • Infantry Battalion (x3)
    • Headquarters & Headquarters Company- 119
    • Rifle Company (x3)- 211
    • Weapons Company- 165

Returning HomeEdit

Trieste United States Troops shoulder patch

The Regiment departed Leghorn, Italy on November 30, 1954 aboard the Military Sea Transportation Service USNS General Sturgis as shipment #19069-A. Returning to Camp Kilmer, New Jersey, the Regiment inactivated at Fort Rucker, Alabama on September 30, 1956.

Under the 84th Training Division[18]Edit

US 84th Infantry Division
The 351st Infantry was redesignated as the 351st Regiment, and reorganized to consist of the 1st, 2d, and 3d Battalions, elements of the 84th Division (Training) on 31 January 1968. On 16 September 1995, the Regimental Headquarters and the 3rd Battalion were inactivated.

Current AssignmentEdit

1st Army
The 1st Battalion is a Regular Army unit assigned to the 181st Infantry Brigade at Fort McCoy, Wisconsin with a mission to train Brigade Support Battalions.

The 2nd Battalion is an Army Reserve unit with a mission to train Combat Support and Combat Service Support units.
The 3rd Battalion is an Army Reserve unit assigned which provides Observer, Controller/ Trainers (OC/T) and Staff to various Mobilization Training Centers responsible for conducting post mobilization training to Reserve Component units preparing them for deployment to Overseas Contingency Operations.

Campaign streamers[18][19][20]Edit

Conflict Streamer Year(s)
World War I
Streamer WWI V
Alsace 1918
World War II
European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal streamer
Streamer WWII V
Rome-Arno[21] 1944
North Apennines[22] 1944-1945
Po Valley[23] 1945

Decorations[24][25][26][27]Edit

Ribbon Award Year
Ruban de la croix de guerre 1939-1945 Croix de Guerre 1944-1945
Army Superior Unit Award ribbon Army Superior Unit Award 2007-2008
U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force Presidential Unit Citation ribbon Presidential Unit Citation (x2) 1944

Shoulder sleeve insignia[28]Edit

1st Army
* Description: On a background equally divided horizontally white and red, 3¼ inches high and 2½ inches wide at base and 2⅛ inches wide at top, a black block letter "A", 2¾ inches high, 2 inches wide at base and 1⅝ inches wide at top, all members 7/16 inch wide, all enclosed within a 1/8 inch Army Green border.
  • Symbolism:
  1. The red and white of the background are the colors used in flags for Armies.
  2. The letter "A" represents "Army" and is also the first letter of the alphabet suggesting "First Army."
  • Background:
  1. A black letter "A" was approved as the authorized insignia by the Commanding General, American Expeditionary Force, on 16 November 1918 and approved by the War Department on 5 May 1922.
  2. The background was added on 17 November 1950.

Distinctive Unit Insignia[29]Edit

351st Regiment Distinctive Unit Insignia
  • Description/Blazon A silver color metal and enamel device 1 1/16 inches (2.70 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Azure, in chief three mullets one and two, the lower ones with two points up and one-half the size of the upper, in base a fleur-de-lis Argent.
  • Symbolism The shield is blue for Infantry; the three stars are taken from the state flag of Minnesota, the "North Star State," the large star at the top representing the North Star. The fleur-de-lis symbolizes the service of the organization in France during World War I.
  • Background The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 351st Regiment Infantry, Organized Reserves on 28 Apr 1928. It was redesignated for the 351st Regiment (AIT) on 12 Aug 1960.

Coat of Arms[29]Edit

351st Infantry Regiment COA
  • Description/Blazon
    • Shield: Azure, in chief three mullets one and two, the lower ones with two points up and one-half the size of the upper, in base a fleur-de-lis Argent.
    • Crest: That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Army Reserve: On a wreath of the colors Argent and Azure, the Lexington Minute Man Proper. The statue of the Minute Man, Captain John Parker (H.H. Kitson, sculptor), stands on the Common in Lexington, Massachusetts.
    • Motto: TOUJOURS PRÊT (Always Ready).
  • Symbolism
    • Shield: The shield is blue for Infantry; the three stars are taken from the state flag of Minnesota, the "North Star State," the large star at the top representing the North Star. The fleur-de-lis symbolizes the service of the organization in France during World War I.
    • Crest: The crest is that of the United States Army Reserve.
    • Background : The coat of arms was originally approved for the 351st Regiment Infantry, Organized Reserve on 28 Apr 1928. It was amended to delete the crest on 2 Dec 1955. On 12 Aug 1960 the coat of arms was redesignated with the Army Reserve crest added for the 351st Regiment

ReferencesEdit

  1. Mahon, John K.; Danysh, Romana (1972). Infantry Part I: Regular Army. Washington, D.C.: Office of the Chief of Military History. http://www.history.army.mil/html/books/060/60-3-1/cmhPub_60-3-1.pdf. 
  2. Unit page at Military.com
  3. Military Map of the United States in 1918
  4. Maneuver and Firepower p56
  5. ORDER OF BATTLE OF THE UNITED STATES LAND FORCES IN THE WORLD WAR p377
  6. Reports of the Commander-in-Chief, Staff Sections and Services p14-18
  7. Maneuver and Firepower p69
  8. Order of battle for the 88th Infantry Division in World War I
  9. Maneuver and Firepower p103
  10. The US Army Order of Battle from 1919-1941 p469
  11. Stanton, Shelby L. (1984). World War II Order of Battle. New York, New York: Galahad Books.
  12. World War II Order of Battle, front cover chart
  13. Maneuver and Firepower p183
  14. Article 21 and Annex VII, Instrument for the Provisional Regime of the Free Territory of Trieste. See: https://treaties.un.org/doc/Publication/UNTS/Volume%2049/v49.pdf
  15. see: United Nations Security Council Resolution 16, 10 January 1947: http://www.un.org/en/ga/search/view_doc.asp?symbol=S/RES/16(1947)
  16. UNTS Vol.235, 3297 Memorandum of Understanding of London
  17. Memorandum of Understanding of London, article 2: see https://treaties.un.org/doc/Publication/UNTS/Volume%20235/v235.pdf
  18. 18.0 18.1 Regimental Lineage and Honors
  19. U.S. Army Center of Military History (CMH). "Listing of the Campaigns of the U.S. Army Displayed on the Army Flag | U.S. Army Center of Military History (CMH)". history.army.mil. http://www.history.army.mil/html/reference/campaigns.html#vie_war. Retrieved 2015-03-03. 
  20. War Department General Order #24 Listing Campaigns
  21. http://www.history.army.mil/html/books/072/72-20/index.html Rome Arno Commemorative Publication
  22. http://www.history.army.mil/html/books/072/72-34/index.html North Apennines Commemorative Publication
  23. http://www.history.army.mil/html/books/072/72-33/index.html Po Valley Commemorative Publication
  24. "CMH". history.army.mil. http://www.history.army.mil/html/forcestruc/orghist.html#tab_2. Retrieved 2015-03-03. 
  25. "Permanent Order 332-07". Department of the Army. 27 November 2012. http://www.first.army.mil/(S(khcx1x45z035js45pzhbo255))/documents%5Cpdf%5CFirstArmyASUA08-11PO332-07.pdf. 
  26. http://www.hrc.army.mil/site/assets/directorate/TAGD/Campaign%20Register%20Prior%20to%201962%20pages%20214%20-%20321.pdf
  27. "Campaign Register Prior to 1962 pages 214 - 321". http://www.hrc.army.mil/site/assets/directorate/TAGD/Campaign%20Register%20Prior%20to%201962%20pages%20214%20-%20321.pdf. 
  28. First Army insignia page at the Institute of Heraldry
  29. 29.0 29.1 Regimental DUI

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