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Klub
3M-54E Sketch.svg
3M-54E sketch
Type Anti-ship missile
Anti-submarine missile
Land attack cruise missile
Place of origin Russia
Service history
Used by See users
Production history
Manufacturer Novator Design Bureau
Specifications
Weight Varies on variant, from 1,300 kg-1780 kg- 2300 kg
Length Varies on variant, from 8.22 m to 6.2 m
Diameter 0.533 m

Warhead Varies

Engine Multi-stage Solid-Fuel rocket, Turbojet engine for 3M-54/E/TE/E1/TE1, -14/E/TE, Solid fuel rocket for 91RE1/RTE2
Operational
range
Varies on variant, maximum range is 300 km
Flight altitude 10-15 m
Speed 0.8-2.5-2.9 mach
Guidance
system
Inertial and Active Radar Homing
Launch
platform
naval ships, submarines

The Russian 3M-54 is a domestic surface ship and submarine-launched anti-ship missile developed by the Novator Design Bureau (OKB-8). Its US Department of Defense (DOD) designation is "SS-N-27A" with the NATO codename of "Sizzler". Derived export versions are the 3M-54E and the 3M-54E1. The 3M-54E has a DOD designation, the SS-N-27B; (it does not have a NATO codename). The 3M-54 and 3M-54E, in their final stage, make a supersonic 'sprint' to the target, reducing the time that target's defense systems have to react. The 3M-54E1 has the capability of subsonic speed in its whole flight. Its range is longer than the 3M-54E.

The name of "Klub" is used for export versions, the 3M-54E and 3M54E1.

Design[edit | edit source]

The missile is a modular system with five different variants: two anti-shipping types, one for land attack, and two with an anti-submarine role. The missile is designed to share common parts between the surface and submarine-launched variants. But each missile consists of different components, for example, the booster. The missile can be launched from a surface ship using a Vertical Launched System (VLS). It has a booster with thrust vectoring capability. The missile launched from a submarine has no need for such an addition, but has a conventional booster instead.

Terminal supersonic flight[edit | edit source]

The Russian domestic variant (3M-54) and export variants (3M-54E/3M-54TE) fly at sub-sonic speeds while achieving supersonic speed as they near their target. They are also believed to be able to perform very high angled defensive maneuvers in contrast to the common linear flight path of other anti-ship cruise missiles.[1]

3M-54E maquette

Variants[2][edit | edit source]

Domestic variants are basic versions of this missile family; these are the 3M-54 and 3M-14. The export model is called the "Klub". There are two major launch vehicles: the Klub-S, designed for use from submarines, and the Klub-N, designed for surface ships. These two launch platforms can be equipped with the following warhead and guidance combinations:

Domestic variants[edit | edit source]

  • 3M-54 - DOD designation SS-N-27A (NATO codename "Sizzler"). An anti-shipping variant deployed in the Russian federation navy, as a submarine launched missile, Its basic length is 8.22 m (27.0 ft), with a 200 kg (440 lb) warhead. Its range is 440–660 km (270–410 mi). It is a Sea-skimmer with supersonic terminal speed and a flight altitude of 4.6 metres (15 ft) at its final stage; its speed is then 2.9 mach.
  • 3M-54T - DOD designation SS-N-27A (NATO codename also "Sizzler"). The anti-shipping variant is deployed in the Russian federation navy, in a surface ship with a VLS launched system and a thrust vectoring booster; its Basic length is 8.9 m (29 ft), its warhead weight and other performances are the same as the 3M-54.
  • 3M-14 - DOD designation SS-N-30A. An Inertial guidance land attack variant deployed in the Russian federation navy. The submarine-launched weapon has a basic length of 6.2 m (20 ft), with a 450 kg (990 lb) warhead. Its range is 600–900 km (370–560 mi). Its subsonic terminal speed is 0.8 mach.
  • 3M-14T - DOD designation SS-N-30A; is the Inertial guidance land attack variant which is deployed in the Russian federation navy. A surface ship with VLS launched missile, with thrust vectoring booster, its basic length is 8.9 m (29 ft), its warhead weight and other performance are the same as the 3M-14.

Export versions[edit | edit source]

3M-54E1 maquette

Klub-S[3][edit | edit source]

  • 3M-54E - DOD designation SS-N-27B is the submarine launched anti-shipping variant, Its basic length is 8.2 m (27 ft), with a 200 kg (440 lb) warhead. Its range is 220 km; (note that its range is less than the 3M-54). It is a sea-skimmer with a supersonic terminal speed and a flight altitude of 4.6 metres (15 ft) at its final stage is 2.9 mach.[4]

3M-14E maquette

  • 3M-54E1 - No DOD designation; is a submarine-launched anti-shipping variant, Its basic length is 6.2 m (20 ft), with a 400 kg (880 lb) warhead. Its range is 300 km (190 mi). It is a sea-skimmer with a subsonic terminal speed of 0.8 mach. It is allegedly capable of disabling or even sinking an aircraft carrier.[5]
  • 3M-14E - DOD designation SS-N-30B. An inertially guided land attack variant; it is launched from a submarine. Its basic length is 6.2 m (20 ft), with a 450 kg (990 lb) warhead. Its range is 300 km (190 mi). It has a subsonic terminal speed of 0.8 mach.
  • 91RE1 - No DOD designation. A submarine-launched anti-submarine variant, it consists of two stages, one solid booster with four grid fins and one anti-submarine light torpedo. Its basic length is 7.65 m (25.1 ft), it has a range of 50 km (31 mi). It can reach supersonic speed. The torpedo has a warhead weight of 76 kg (168 lb). It is similar to the American ASROC/SUBROC missile/torpedo system. It follows a ballistic path on the surface, with a speed of Mach 2.5.

91RE1 maquette

Klub-N[3][edit | edit source]

  • 3M-54TE - DOD designation SS-N-27B. A surface vessel with VLS launched anti-shipping variant; with a thrust vectoring booster. Its basic length is 8.9 m, its warhead weight and other performance is the same as the 3M-54E. Its range is less than the 3M-54. It is a sea-skimmer with supersonic terminal speed and a flight altitude of 15 feet (4.6 m) at its final stage, when it has a speed of 2.9 mach.
  • 3M-54TE1 - No DOD designation. A surface ship with VLS anti-shipping variant, with thrust vectoring booster. Its basic length is 8.9 m (29 ft), its warhead weight and other performance is the same as the 3M-54E1. A sea-skimmer with a subsonic terminal speed of 0.8 mach. It is also allegedly capable of disabling or even sinking an aircraft carrier.
  • 3M-14TE - DOD designation SS-N-30B. An inertially guided land attack variant. It is a surface ship with VLS missile and a thrust vectoring booster. Its basic length is 8.9 m (29 ft), its warhead weight and other performances are the same as the 3M-14E. Its subsonic terminal speed is 0.8 mach.

91RTE2 maquette

  • 91RTE2 - No DOD designation. A surface ship with the VLS launched anti-submarine variant; it consists of three stages, one booster with thrust vector nozzle, one conventional booster, and one anti-submarine light torpedo. Its basic length is 8.9 m (29 ft), with a range of 40 km (25 mi) at supersonic speed. The torpedo has a warhead weight of 76 kg (168 lb). The lightest of all variants, with a launch weight of 1,300 kg (2,900 lb). Speed is Mach 2.

Launch Platforms[edit | edit source]

The Russian Kilo class submarine is the primary launch platform for the missile. The future Russian Lada class and its variants should also be able to launch this weapon. The Indian Talwar class frigate is another primary shipborne launch platform for the missile. The Akula class and the new Yasen class can also launch it. The new Russian Admiral Sergei Gorshkov class frigates and the second batch of Steregushchy class frigates use the same UKSK VLS as the Talwar class frigates, and thus would be able to carry these missiles as well.

In addition it is believed by some analysts that an air-launched variant will be developed to arm the Tu-142s currently in service with both the Russian and Indian Navies; it is also anticipated that the Tu-22M3 operated by the Indian Navy will be equipped with the missile.[6] A truck mounted version is planned for development by the Novator Design Bureau.

A Klub-K variant, which launches from a commercial-appearing shipping container mounted on a truck, train, or merchant vessel, was advertised in 2010 [7] and was shown for the first time at the MAKS 2011 airshow [8][9]

Operators[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. "Navy Lacks Plan to Defend Against `Sizzler' Missile". Archived from the original on 19 November 2007. http://web.archive.org/web/20071119102801/http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601070&sid=a5LkaU0wj714&refer=home. Retrieved 2007-11-11. 
  2. Jane's Weapons: Naval 2012-2013,Janes Information Group,2012,p. 13
  3. 3.0 3.1 Jane's Weapons: Naval 2012-2013,Janes Information Group,2012,p. 15 -
  4. KLUB (SS-N-27) ASCM[dead link]
  5. strategypage.com - Arming Container Ships With Anti-Ship Missiles
  6. "3M-54 Klub". Federation of American Scientists. Archived from the original on 13 February 2008. http://web.archive.org/web/20080213003626/http://www.fas.org/man/dod-101/sys/missile/row/club.htm. Retrieved 2008-02-04. 
  7. "Deadly New Russian Weapon Hides In Shipping Container". New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/reuters/2010/04/26/world/international-us-russia-weapon.html. Retrieved 2010-04-27. [dead link]
  8. "MAKS: Russian firm debuts shipping container-housed cruise missiles". Flight Global. http://www.flightglobal.com/articles/2011/08/23/361105/maks-russian-firm-debuts-shipping-container-housed-cruise.html. Retrieved 2011-08-23. 
  9. "Russian company unveils 'bomb in a box' cruise missile system". RIA Novosti. http://en.rian.ru/mlitary_news/20110817/165865506.html. Retrieved 2011-08-23. 
  10. Pandit, Rajat (August 4, 2008). "India to acquire new undersea cruise missiles". Times of India. http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2008-08-04/india/27891546_1_kilo-class-new-sonars-cruise-missiles. Retrieved 2008-08-04. 
  11. Newsweek, article “China’s Carrier Killers”, Oct. 4, 2010
  12. Strategy Page, article Iranian Submarine Launched Missiles, Aug. 30, 2006
  13. NTI, article Iran Submarine Import and Export Behavior, Aug. 8, 2012

External links[edit | edit source]

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