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924th Air Refueling Squadron Shield Strategic Air Command.png
Active 1942-1943: 1959-1992
Country  United States
Branch  United States Air Force
Role Air Refueling
Decorations Air Force Outstanding Unit Award
Insignia
924th Air Refueling Squadron Emblem 924th Air Refueling Squadron.PNG

The 924th Air Refueling Squadron is an inactive United States Air Force unit. It was last assigned to the 93d Operations Group at Castle AFB, California, where it was inactivated on 31 October 1994.

The earliest predecessor of the squadron was the 24th Transport Squadron which was activated at Morrison Field, Florida in 1942. The squadron supported the South Atlantic ferrying route of Air Corps Ferrying Command until it was disbanded in 1943.

The 924th Air Refueling Squadron was activated at Castle in 1959. Through most of its existence it served as the "schoolhouse" for Boeing KC-135 Stratotanker crews. It was inactivated in 1992, just before Strategic Air Command was inactivated and responsibility for tanker training transferred to Air Mobility Command.

History[edit | edit source]

World War II[edit | edit source]

The earliest predecessor of the squadron was the 24th Transport Squadron which was activated at Morrison Field, Florida in 1943. The squadron supported the South Atlantic ferrying route of Air Corps Ferrying Command as Morrison served as the western terminus of the route, processing personnel and equipment for deployment overseas.[1] The squadron flew various aircraft to carry out its mission of transporting men and aircraft across the Atlantic Ocean under the supervision of the Caribbean Wing, Air Transport Command. The squadron was disbanded in a 1943 reorganization of Air Transport Command and its personnel transferred to Station 11, Caribbean Wing, Air Transport Command.

Cold War[edit | edit source]

The 924th Air Refueling Squadron was activated on 1 July 1959 by Strategic Air Command (SAC) at Castle AFB and assigned to the 93d Bombardment Wing. Equipped with Boeing KC-135 Stratotankers, its primary mission was to train KC-135 aircrews for SAC tanker units. It also provided air refueling to the Boeing B-52 Stratofortress strategic bombers of its parent wing as they conducted combat crew training in the "Buff." and to other USAF units as directed. Later, the 93d Air Refueling Squadron assumed the bulk of the training mission[2] and the squadron deployed crews and aircraft to the Western Pacific region to support combat operations of deployed SAC units and tactical aircraft during the Vietnam War from 1966 to 1972. The squadron also supported the Pacific, European, and Alaskan Tanker Task Forces.[2] It deployed personnel and equipment to the Middle East in 1990 as part of Operation Desert Shield, and in 1991 for combat operations during Operation Desert Storm. The 924th had the distinction of having Strategic Air Command's first all-female airborne alert crew in 1982, appropriately named "Fair Force One". The squadron was inactivated in 1992 as part of drawdown of United States strategic forces after the end of the Cold War and in anticipation of the closure of Castle and of Air Mobility Command assuming responsibility for air refueling and moving tanker training to Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma.

Lineage[edit | edit source]

24th Transport Squadron

  • Constituted as the 24th Air Corps Ferry Squadron ca. 19 February 1942
Activated on 27 April 1942
Redesignated 24th Transport Squadron on 29 March 1943
  • Disbanded on 13 October 1943
  • Reconstituted on 19 September 1985 and consolidated with the 924th Air Refueling Squadron as the 924th Air Refueling Squadron

924th Air Refueling Squadron

  • Constituted as the 924th Air Refueling Squadron, Heavy on 20 May 1959
Activated on 1 July 1959[3]
Redesignated 924th Air Refueling Squadron, Heavy (Training) on 2 September 1967
Redesignated 924th Air Refueling Squadron on 1 September 1991
Inactivated on 30 April 1992

Assignments[edit | edit source]

  • South Atlantic Sector, Air Corps Ferrying Command: 27 April 1942
  • 27th AAF Ferrying Wing: 19 June 1942
  • 15th Ferrying Group (later 15th Transport Group): 9 July 1942 - 13 October 1943
  • 93d Bombardment Wing: 1 July 1959[4] - 1 September 1991
  • 93d Operations Group: 1 September 1991 - 30 April 1992

Stations[edit | edit source]

  • Morrison Field, Florida, 27 April 1942 - 13 October 1943
  • Castle Air Force Base, California, 1 July 1959[3] - 30 April 1992

Awards and Campaigns[edit | edit source]

Award streamer Award Dates Notes
Air Force Outstanding Unit Award Streamer.jpg Air Force Outstanding Unit Award 1 July 1963 - 31 March 1964 924th Air Refueling Squadron[5]
Air Force Outstanding Unit Award Streamer.jpg Air Force Outstanding Unit Award 1 April 1973 - 30 June 1974 924th Air Refueling Squadron[6]
Air Force Outstanding Unit Award Streamer.jpg Air Force Outstanding Unit Award 2 August 1990 - 11 April 1991 924th Air Refueling Squadron[7]
Service Streamer Theater Dates Notes
World War II - American Campaign Streamer (Plain).png American Theater 27 April 1942 – 13 October 1943 24th Transport Squadron

References[edit | edit source]

Notes[edit | edit source]

  1. Abstract, History Morrison Field 1940-1944 (retrieved October 3, 2013)
  2. 2.0 2.1 Abstract (Unclassified), History 93d Bombardment Wing Oct 1983-Mar 1984 (Secret) (retrieved October 3, 2013)
  3. 3.0 3.1 Mueller, Robert (1989). Air Force Bases, Vol. I, Active Air Force Bases Within the United States of America on 17 September 1982. Washington, DC: Office of Air Force History. p. 96. ISBN 0-912799-53-6. http://www.afhso.af.mil/shared/media/document/AFD-100921-026.pdf. 
  4. Ravenstein, Charles A. (1984). Air Force Combat Wings, Lineage & Honors Histories 1947-1977. Washington, DC: Office of Air Force History. p. 130. ISBN 0-912799-12-9. http://www.airforcehistory.hq.af.mil/Publications/fulltext/combat_wings.pdf. 
  5. AF Pamphlet 900-2, Unit Decorations, Awards and Campaign Participation Credits Department of the Air Force, Washington, DC, 15 Jun 1971, p. 480
  6. AF Pamphlet 900-2, Unit Decorations, Awards and Campaign Participation Credits, Vol II Department of the Air Force, Washington, DC, 30 Sep 1976 , p. 94
  7. Air Force Recognition Programs (search performed October 3, 2013)

Bibliography[edit | edit source]

 This article incorporates public domain material from the Air Force Historical Research Agency website http://www.afhra.af.mil/.


 This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Air Force website http://www.af.mil.

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