Military Wiki
 
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{{Infobox military unit|
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{{Infobox military unit
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|unit_name= 9 Squadron
 
|unit_name= 9 Squadron
|image=[[File:Supermarine Spitfire Mk IX -Indianapolis Air Show-24Aug2008.jpg|280px]]
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|image=Supermarine Spitfire Mk IX -Indianapolis Air Show-24Aug2008.jpg
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|image_size=280px
 
|caption=''Supermarine Spitfire Mk IX as flown by 9 Squadron from July 1944 - February 1945''
 
|caption=''Supermarine Spitfire Mk IX as flown by 9 Squadron from July 1944 - February 1945''
 
|dates=19 May 1944-1 February 1945
 
|dates=19 May 1944-1 February 1945
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|role=Fighter Sqn
 
|role=Fighter Sqn
 
|size=
 
|size=
|command_structure=
 
 
|current_commander=
 
|current_commander=
 
|garrison=
 
|garrison=
|garrison_label=
 
|ceremonial_chief=
 
|colonel_of_the_regiment=
 
|nickname=
 
|patron=
 
|motto=
 
|colors=
 
|colors_label=
 
|march=
 
|mascot=
 
|equipment=
 
|equipment_label=
 
 
|battles=
 
|battles=
|anniversaries=
 
 
|decorations=
 
|decorations=
|commander1=
 
|commander1_label=
 
|commander2=
 
|commander2_label=
 
|commander3=
 
|commander3_label=
 
|notable_commanders=
 
<!-- Insignia -->
 
|identification_symbol=
 
 
|identification_symbol_label=Squadron Identification Code
 
|identification_symbol_label=Squadron Identification Code
|identification_symbol_2=
 
|identification_symbol_2_label=
 
 
}}
 
}}
   
'''9 Squadron''' SAAF was a short lived squadron of the [[South African Air Force]] during [[World War II]]. It was formed on 19 May 1944 in Egypt and was transferred to Minnick in Syria shortly after being formed. It spent less than a month in Syria when it was re-deployed back to [[El Gamil]] in Egypt on 28 June 1944. This transfer was after it had been decided that there was no longer any need to maintain forces on high alert close to Turkey.<ref name="Martin">Martin, H.J. (1978) Pg. 230</ref> From here the squadron was tasked to provide air protection of the Suez Canal and the coastline of the Nile Delta.<ref name="HoW9Sqn">{{cite web|last=Rickard|first=J.|title=History of War|url=http://www.historyofwar.org/air/units/SAAF/9_wwII.html|work=No. 9 Squadron (SAAF): Second World War|accessdate=18 September 2011}}</ref>
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'''9 Squadron''' SAAF was a short lived squadron of the [[South African Air Force]] during [[World War II]]. It was formed on 19 May 1944 in Egypt and was transferred to Minnick in Syria shortly after being formed. It spent less than a month in Syria when it was re-deployed back to El Gamil in Egypt on 28 June 1944. This transfer was after it had been decided that there was no longer any need to maintain forces on high alert close to Turkey.<ref name="Martin">Martin, H.J. (1978) Pg. 230</ref> From here the squadron was tasked to provide air protection of the Suez Canal and the coastline of the Nile Delta.<ref name="HoW9Sqn">{{cite web|last=Rickard|first=J.|title=History of War|url=http://www.historyofwar.org/air/units/SAAF/9_wwII.html|work=No. 9 Squadron (SAAF): Second World War|accessdate=18 September 2011}}</ref>
   
 
In September 1944 the squadron was moved to Savoia in Libya, from where it flew fighter sweeps over Crete (December 1944), before being disbanded on 1 February 1945.<ref name=HoW9Sqn />
 
In September 1944 the squadron was moved to Savoia in Libya, from where it flew fighter sweeps over Crete (December 1944), before being disbanded on 1 February 1945.<ref name=HoW9Sqn />
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==Other information==
 
==Other information==
 
===Notes and References===
 
===Notes and References===
* {{cite book|last1=Martin|first1=H.J. Lt-Gen|last2=Orpen|first2=Neil D.|series=South African Forces: World War II. Vol VI|title= Eagles Victorious| year=1978|publisher=Purnell, Cape Town|isbn=978-0-86843-008-9 }}
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* {{cite book|last1=Martin|first1=H.J. Lt-Gen|last2=Orpen|first2=Neil D.|series=South African Forces: World War II. Vol VI|title= Eagles Victorious| year=1978|publisher=Purnell, Cape Town|isbn=978-0-86843-008-9}}
   
==== ====
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;Citations
 
;Citations
 
{{Reflist}}
 
{{Reflist}}
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[[Category:Squadrons of the South African Air Force]]
 
[[Category:Squadrons of the South African Air Force]]
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{{Wikipedia|9 Squadron SAAF}}

Latest revision as of 20:11, 14 December 2019

9 Squadron
Supermarine Spitfire Mk IX -Indianapolis Air Show-24Aug2008.jpg
Supermarine Spitfire Mk IX as flown by 9 Squadron from July 1944 - February 1945
Active 19 May 1944-1 February 1945
Country South Africa
Branch South African Air Force
Role Fighter Sqn

9 Squadron SAAF was a short lived squadron of the South African Air Force during World War II. It was formed on 19 May 1944 in Egypt and was transferred to Minnick in Syria shortly after being formed. It spent less than a month in Syria when it was re-deployed back to El Gamil in Egypt on 28 June 1944. This transfer was after it had been decided that there was no longer any need to maintain forces on high alert close to Turkey.[1] From here the squadron was tasked to provide air protection of the Suez Canal and the coastline of the Nile Delta.[2]

In September 1944 the squadron was moved to Savoia in Libya, from where it flew fighter sweeps over Crete (December 1944), before being disbanded on 1 February 1945.[2]

The squadron flew Supermarine Spitfire Mk.VB's and VC's from June 1944-February 1945 and Spitfire Mk.IX's were phased in from 10 November 1944 (being ex-10 Squadron aircraft when that unit was disbanded on 31 October 1944). The Mk IX aircraft remained in service until February 1945.[3]

Aircraft[]

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Other information[]

Notes and References[]

  • Martin, H.J. Lt-Gen; Orpen, Neil D. (1978). Eagles Victorious. South African Forces: World War II. Vol VI. Purnell, Cape Town. ISBN 978-0-86843-008-9. 

==[]

Citations
  1. Martin, H.J. (1978) Pg. 230
  2. 2.0 2.1 Rickard, J.. "History of War". No. 9 Squadron (SAAF): Second World War. http://www.historyofwar.org/air/units/SAAF/9_wwII.html. Retrieved 18 September 2011. 
  3. Martin, H.J. (1978) Pg. 330

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