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9th Motorized Division Pasubio
Active 1934–1943
Country Italy Regno d'Italia
Kingdom of Italy
Branch Flag of Italy (1860).svg Regio Esercito
Royal Italian Army
Type Infantry
Role Motorised
Size Division
Part of Italian Expeditionary Corps in Russia
8th Army
Garrison/HQ Verona
Nickname(s) Pasubio
Engagements World War II
Invasion of Yugoslavia
Eastern Front
Assault on Stalino
Battle of Nikolayevka
Insignia
Identification
symbol
File:9 Motorised Division Pasubio.jpg
Identification
symbol
Pasubio Division collar insignia

9th Motorized Division Pasubio was a Motorised Infantry[nb 1] Division of the Italian Army during World War II. The division was mobilized in August 1940, and took part in the Invasion of Yugoslavia in April 1941, capturing Split and Sienih. In August 1941, the Division was then sent to the Eastern front as part of the Italian Expeditionary Corps in Russia or Corpo di Spedizione Italiano in Russia (CSIR). It remained in Russia until May 1943, when it was withdrawn to Italy. The division was located in the Salerno being reformed and refurbished when it was captured by German forces.[1][2]

Its 79th Infantry Regiment and 8th Artillery Regiment were made up of men from Verona, while the ranks of the 80th Regiment were filled with men from Mantua. Its 1st Sabauda CCNN Battalion was made up of volunteers from Turin.

Order of battle[edit | edit source]

  • 79th Roma Infantry Regiment
    • 79th Command Company
    • 1st Roma Infantry Battalion
    • 2nd Roma Infantry Battalion
    • 3rd Roma Infantry Battalion
    • 87th Mortar Company with 81mm Mortars
    • 87th Support Arms Company with 65/17 Field Guns
  • 80th Roma Infantry Regiment
    • 80th Command Company
    • 4th Roma Infantry Battalion
    • 5th Roma Infantry Battalion
    • 6th Roma Infantry Battalion
    • 87th Mortar Company with 81mm Mortars
    • 87th Suppurt Arms Company with 65/17 Field Guns
  • 8th Pasubio Artillery Regiment
    • 1st Artillery Group with 100/17 Field Cannons
    • 2nd Artillery Group with 75/27 Field Cannons
    • 3rd Artillery Group with 75/27 Field Cannons
    • 85th Anti-Aircraft Battery with 20mm Anti-Aircraft Guns
    • 309th Anti-Aircraft Battery with 20mm Anti-Aircraft Guns
  • 1st CCNN Legion (Blackshirts)
    • 1st Sabauda CCNN Battalion
    • CCNN Battalion
  • 5th Mortar Battalion with 81mm Mortars
  • 9th Mortar Battalion with 81mm Mortars
  • 9th Anti-Tank Company with 47/32 Anti-Tank Guns
  • 141st Anti-Tank Company with 47/32 Anti-Tank Guns
  • 30th Pioneer Company
  • 9th Signal Company
  • 5th Medical Section
    • 25th Surgical Unit
    • 825th Field Hospital
    • 826th Field Hospital
    • 836th Field Hospital
    • 874th Field Hospital
  • 25th Motorized Carabinieri Section
  • 26th Motorized Carabinieri Section
  • 95th Searchlight Section
  • 11th Supply Section
  • 26th Field Bakery
  • 91st Fuel Section
  • 8th Traffic Control Unit
  • 9th Maintenance Unit
  • 9th Automobiles Platoon
  • 83rd Field Post Office

[1] [nb 2]

Notes[edit | edit source]

Footnotes
  1. The division never had the required amount of Motor Transport to move all its units at the same time and is sometimes referred to as a Semi Motorized Division
  2. An Italian Infantry Division normally consisted of two Infantry Regiments (three Battalions each), an Artillery Regiment, a Mortar Battalion (two companies), an Anti Tank Company, a Blackshirt Legion (Regiment of two Battalions). Each Division had only about 7,000 men. The Infantry and Artillery Regiments contained 1,650 men, the Blackshirt Legion 1,200, each company 150 men.[3]
Citations
  1. 1.0 1.1 Wendal, Marcus. "Italian Army". Axis History. http://www.axishistory.com/index.php?id=8556. Retrieved 2009-10-04. 
  2. "The Axis". The Canadian Soldier. http://www.canadiansoldiers.com/enemies/theaxis.htm. Retrieved 2009-10-04. 
  3. Paoletti, p 170


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