Warning: You are not logged in. Your IP address will be publicly visible if you make any edits. If you log in or create an account, your edits will be attributed to your username, along with other benefits.

The edit can be undone. Please check the comparison below to verify that this is what you want to do, and then save the changes below to finish undoing the edit.

Latest revision Your text
Line 26: Line 26:
 
|}}
 
|}}
   
The '''Battle of Cambrai''' (20 November – 7 December 1917) was a British campaign of the [[World War I|First World War]]. Cambrai, in the ''Nord département'' (''Nord-Pas-de-Calais''), was a key supply point for the [[German Empire|German]] ''Siegfried Stellung'' (part of the [[Hindenburg Line]]) and the nearby Bourlon Ridge would be an excellent gain from which to threaten the rear of the German line to the north. The operation was to include an experimental artillery action. [[Major General]] [[Henry Hugh Tudor|Tudor]], Commander Royal Artillery ([[Commander, Royal Artillery|CRA]]) of the [[9th (Scottish) Division|9th]] Division, suggested trying out new artillery-infantry techniques on his sector of the front. During preparations, [[J. F. C. Fuller]], a staff officer with the [[Royal Tank Corps]] (RTC), was in the process of looking for a place to use tanks as raiding parties. [[General]] [[Julian Byng]], commander of the British [[Third Army (United Kingdom)|Third Army]], decided to incorporate them into the attack.
+
The '''Battle of Cambrai''' (20 November – 7 December 1917) was a British campaign of the [[World War I|First World War]]. Cambrai, in the [[Nord (département)|''Nord département'']] (''Nord-Pas-de-Calais''), was a key supply point for the [[German Empire|German]] ''Siegfried Stellung'' (part of the [[Hindenburg Line]]) and the nearby Bourlon Ridge would be an excellent gain from which to threaten the rear of the German line to the north. The operation was to include an experimental artillery action. [[Major General]] [[Henry Hugh Tudor|Tudor]], Commander Royal Artillery ([[Commander, Royal Artillery|CRA]]) of the [[9th (Scottish) Division|9th]] Division, suggested trying out new artillery-infantry techniques on his sector of the front. During preparations, [[J. F. C. Fuller]], a staff officer with the [[Royal Tank Corps]] (RTC), was in the process of looking for a place to use tanks as raiding parties. [[General]] [[Julian Byng]], commander of the British [[Third Army (United Kingdom)|Third Army]], decided to incorporate them into the attack.
   
 
The battle is often erroneously noted for being the first mass use of [[tank]]s in a [[combined arms]] operation. However, the French had deployed large numbers of tanks in {{nowrap|April (130+),}} {{nowrap|May (48)}} and {{nowrap|October (92)}} 1917, and the British more than {{nowrap|200 in}} Flanders in June and July. Despite the initial success of the [[Mark IV tank]]s at Cambrai, German artillery and infantry defences exposed the frailties of their armour and the vehicles became mostly ineffective after the first day. The battle was largely an artillery-infantry engagement that achieved, surprise and technical superiority against strong fortifications but weak German infantry and artillery defences, which were quickly reinforced. The British attack demonstrated that the Hindenburg Line could be penetrated and showed the value of new artillery and infantry methods, such as sound ranging and infiltration tactics that would later play a vital part during the [[Hundred Days Offensive]].
 
The battle is often erroneously noted for being the first mass use of [[tank]]s in a [[combined arms]] operation. However, the French had deployed large numbers of tanks in {{nowrap|April (130+),}} {{nowrap|May (48)}} and {{nowrap|October (92)}} 1917, and the British more than {{nowrap|200 in}} Flanders in June and July. Despite the initial success of the [[Mark IV tank]]s at Cambrai, German artillery and infantry defences exposed the frailties of their armour and the vehicles became mostly ineffective after the first day. The battle was largely an artillery-infantry engagement that achieved, surprise and technical superiority against strong fortifications but weak German infantry and artillery defences, which were quickly reinforced. The British attack demonstrated that the Hindenburg Line could be penetrated and showed the value of new artillery and infantry methods, such as sound ranging and infiltration tactics that would later play a vital part during the [[Hundred Days Offensive]].

Please note that all contributions to the Military Wiki are considered to be released under the CC-BY-SA

Cancel Editing help (opens in new window)

Templates used on this page: