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Chief of the Joint General Staff
Tổng Tham mưu trưởng
ARVN Joint General Staff Commander Flag.svg
Flag of the Joint General Staff
ARVN Joint General Staff Insignia.svg
Emblem for the Joint General Staff
Ministry of Defense
Ministry of Defense
Status Abolished
Member of Republic of Vietnam Military Forces
Reports to Defense Minister
Residence Camp Trần Hưng Đạo
Seat Joint General Staff
Appointer President of South Vietnam
Formation March 1952
First holder Nguyễn Văn Hinh
Final holder Nguyễn Hữu Hạnh
Abolished 30 April 1975

The Chief of the Joint General Staff (Vietnamese language: Tổng Tham mưu trưởng ) was the highest-ranking military officer of in the Republic of Vietnam Military Forces, who was responsible for maintaining the operational command of the military and its three major branches.

History[]

The position was established with the creation of the General Staff of the Vietnamese National Army, in 1952. Follwoing Vietnam's independence from France in October 1955, the title was changed to Chief of the Joint General Staff.

List of commanders[]

Vietnamese National Army[]

Name Took office Left office Time in office Ref
1
Nguyễn Văn Hinh
Hinh, NguyễnLieutenant general Nguyễn Văn Hinh
(1915–2004)
March 195229 November 19542 years, 8 months[1]
2Tỵ, LêLieutenant general Lê Văn Tỵ
(1903–1964)
29 November 195423 March 19583 years, 3 months[2]

Republic of Vietnam Military Forces[]

Name Took office Left office Time in office Ref
1Tỵ, LêArmy general Lê Văn Tỵ
(1903–1964)
23 March 1958December 19624 years, 8 months.
-Khiêm, TrầnLieutenant general Trần Thiện Khiêm (Acting)
(born 1925)
December 1962August 19638 months[3]
2Đôn, TrầnLieutenant general Trần Văn Đôn
(1917–1998)
August 196310 January 19645 months.
3
Nguyễn Khánh
Khánh, NguyễnLieutenant general Nguyễn Khánh
(1927–2013)
January 1964February 19645 months.
4Khiêm, TrầnLieutenant general Trần Thiện Khiêm
(born 1925)
February 1964October 19648 months.
(3)
Nguyễn Khánh
Khánh, NguyễnLieutenant general Nguyễn Khánh
(1927–2013)
October 1964February 19654 months.
5Minh, TrầnLieutenant general Trần Văn Minh
(1923–2009)
February 1965July 19655 months[4]
6Có, NguyễnLieutenant general Nguyễn Hữu Có
(1925–2012)
July 1965October 19653 months.
7Viên, CaoLieutenant general Cao Văn Viên
(1921–2008)
October 196526 April 19759 years, 6 months[5][6]
8Khuyên, ĐồngLieutenant general vi (Đồng Văn Khuyên)
(1927–2015)
27 April 197528 April 19751 day.
9Lộc, NguyễnLieutenant general Nguyễn Phước Vĩnh Lộc
(1923–2009)
29 April 197529 April 19750 days.
10Hạnh, NguyễnBrigadier General Nguyễn Hữu Hạnh
(1926–2019)
30 April 197530 April 19750 days.

References[]

  1. Vo, Nghia M. (2011). Saigon: A History. McFarland & Company, Inc.. p. 128. ""The newly-formed 30,000-man South Vietnamese army (SVA) was led by Lieutenant-General Nguyễn Văn Hinh, a naturalized French citizen and a Bảo Đại admirer. Hinh, son of former Prime Minister Nguyễn Văn Tâm, ..."" 
  2. Luận, Nguyễn Công (2012). Nationalist in the Viet Nam Wars: Memoirs of a Victim Turned Soldier. Indiana University Press. p. ?. ""General Lê Văn Tỵ was appointed joint general chief of staff, replacing General Nguyễn Văn Hinh. The remnants of the French supporters lost their foothold in the nationalist army."" 
  3. Hammer, Ellen J. (1987). A Death in November: America in Vietnam, 1963. New York City: E. P. Dutton. p. 133. ISBN 0-525-24210-4. 
  4. FOREIGN RELATIONS OF THE UNITED STATES, 1964–1968, VOLUME II: VIETNAM, JANUARY-JUNE 1965
  5. Butterfield, Fox. "The Communists Were Stunned, Too" The New York Times May 12, 1985
  6. Holley, Joe. "Cao Van Vien, South Vietnam 4-Star General" The Washington Post January 30, 2008

External links[]


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