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Communist insurgency in the Philippines
Part of the Cold War and the Civil conflict in the Philippines
DateMarch 29, 1969–Present
LocationPhilippines
Status Ongoing
Belligerents

 Philippines Supported by:

United States

Flag of the Communist Party of Vietnam.svg Communist Party of the Philippines
NPA.png New People's Army
NDF Flag.svg National Democratic Front

Supported by:
China China
Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Libya[1]
(until 2011)

 North Korea[2]
Commanders and leaders

Philippines Ferdinand Marcos
Philippines Corazon Aquino
Philippines Fidel Ramos
Philippines Joseph Estrada
Philippines Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo

Philippines Benigno Aquino III

NPA.png Jose Maria Sison
NPA.png Bernabe Buscayno

NPA.png Romulo Kintanar
Casualties and losses
9,867 killed (1971-2002) 22,799 killed (1971-2002)
10,672+ civilians killed (1969-2002)[3]

The Communist insurgency in the Philippines refers to conflict between the government of the Philippines and the Communist Party of the Philippines and their New People's Army (NPA).

The risk from the Communist insurgency has declined in recent years from its peak in the 1980s. The NPA has never received much if any support from outside the Philippines and has always relied solely on support from the local population. In 2010, a government crackdown further weakened the rebels significantly.

The Uppsala Conflict Data Program, a university-based data collection program considered to be "one of the most accurate and well-used data-sources on global armed conflicts,"[4] reported that between 6,970-9,366 people were killed in fighting between the Government of the Philippines and the CPP (Communist Party of the Philippines) between 1989 and 2012.[5]

See also[]

References[]

  1. Libyan terrorism: the case against Gaddafi. - Free Online Library
  2. Patterns of Global Terrorism: 1990; Overview of State-Sponsored Terrorism, Federation of American Scientists
  3. 29 Jan. 2003 Philippine Daily Inquirer: Killed in Communist rebellion, AFP Intelligence Service report:
  4. Human Security Data, Ford Institute for Human Security.
  5. Philippines, Uppsala Conflict Data Program, Government of Philippines - CPP, viewed 2014-01-16.

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