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==First World War==
 
==First World War==
 
{{See also|Recruitment to the British Army during the First World War}}
 
{{See also|Recruitment to the British Army during the First World War}}
Conscription during First World War began when the [[United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland|British]] government passed the [[Military Service Act 1916|Military Service Act]] in 1916. The act specified that single men aged 18 to 41 years old were liable to be called up for military service unless they were widowed with children or ministers of a religion. There was a system of [[Military Service Tribunals]] to adjudicate upon claims for exemption upon the grounds of performing civilian work of national importance, domestic hardship, health, and [[Conscientious objector|conscientious objection]]. The law went through several changes before the war ended. Married men were exempt in the original Act, although this was changed in June 1916. The age limit was also eventually raised to 51 years old. Recognition of work of national importance also diminished, and in the last year of the war there was some support for the conscription of clergy.<ref>Chelmsford, J. E. "Clergy and Man-Power", ''The Times'' 15 April 1918, p. 12</ref> Conscription lasted until mid-1919.
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Conscription during First World War began when the [[United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland|British]] government passed the [[Military Service Act 1916|Military Service Act]] in 1916. The act specified that single men aged 18 to 41 years old were liable to be called up for military service unless they were widowed with children or ministers of a religion. There was a system of [[Military Service Tribunals]] to adjudicate upon claims for exemption upon the grounds of performing civilian work of national importance, domestic hardship, health, and [[Conscientious objector|conscientious objection]]. The law went through several changes before the war ended. Married men were exempt in the original Act, although this was changed in June 1916. The age limit was also eventually raised to 51 years old. Recognition of work of national importance also diminished, and in the last year of the war there was some support for the conscription of clergy.<ref>Chelmsford, J. E. "Clergy and Man-Power", ''[[The Times]]'' 15 April 1918, p. 12</ref> Conscription lasted until mid-1919.
   
 
==Second World War==
 
==Second World War==
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*''[[Get Some In!]]'' – UK TV sit-com set in National Service [[RAF]]
 
*''[[Get Some In!]]'' – UK TV sit-com set in National Service [[RAF]]
 
*''[[The Army Game]]'' – UK sit-com contemporary with National Service
 
*''[[The Army Game]]'' – UK sit-com contemporary with National Service
* ''Privates'' – UK mini-series about National Service
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* [[Privates (TV series)|''Privates'']] – UK mini-series about National Service
   
 
==References==
 
==References==

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