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Donald Armstong
Born April 1889
Died January 11, 1984
Place of birth Stapleton, New York
Place of death Palm Beach, Florida[1]
Buried at Arlington National Cemetery[2]
Allegiance  United States
Service/branch  United States Army
Years of service 36 years
Rank Brigadier General
Unit Coast Artillery Corps
Commands held Tank Automotive Center, Ordnance Replacement Center, Army Industrial College[3]
Battles/wars World War I, World War II
Awards Distinguished Service Medal, Legion of Merit
Other work President of United States Pipe and Foundry Company, Author[1]

Donald Armstrong (April 1889- January 11, 1984) was a Brigadier General in the United States Army during World War II. During the war, he commanded the Tank Automotive Center, the Ordnance Replacement Training Center, and was commandant of the Army Industrial College.

Early life[edit | edit source]

Armstrong was born on April 1889 in Stapleton, New York. Prior to military service, he attend Columbia University and received a Bachelors in Arts in 1909 and a Masters in Art in 1910.[3]

Military career[edit | edit source]

On September 10, 1910, Armstrong was commissioned in the Coast Artillery Corps. During World War I, he was stationed in France. He participated during the Champagne and Meuse-Argonne offensives.[3] In 1919, Armstrong was assistant military attaché to the United State Embassy in Paris.[1] In 1927, he graduated from the Army Industrial College.[3]

During World War II, Armstrong was promoted to Brigadier General. From 1942 to 1944, he commanded the Tank Automotive Center and the Ordnance Replacement Training Center. From 1944 to 1946, Armstrong was commandant of the Army Industrial College. On October 1946, Armstrong retired from the Army.[3] For his role in World War II, Armstrong was award with the Army Distinguished Service Medal and the Legion of Merit.[4]

Later career and life[edit | edit source]

After retiring from the military, Armstrong was president of the United States Pipe and Foundry Company from 1947 to 1951.[1] In 1966, he published The Reluctant Warriors, a book on the Third Punic War.

He died on January 11, 1984, in Florida.[3]

Personal life[edit | edit source]

Armstrong was married and had one son. He also had two stepdaughters and three grandchildren.[1]

Honors and Awards[edit | edit source]

Army Distinguished Service Medal[edit | edit source]

Citation[edit | edit source]

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Army Distinguished Service Medal to Brigadier General Donald Armstrong (ASN: 0-2967), United States Army, for exceptionally meritorious and distinguished services to the Government of the United States, in a duty of great responsibility during the period from February 1945 to July 1946. The singularly distinctive accomplishments of General Armstrong reflect the highest credit upon himself and the United States Army.[4]

Legion of Merit[edit | edit source]

Citation[edit | edit source]

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Legion of Merit (Navy Award) to Brigadier General Donald Armstrong (ASN: 0-2967), United States Army, for exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services to the Government of the United States. As Commandant of the Army Industrial College from 1 September 1944 to 20 February 1945, during which time over 1,600 Navy officers and civilians were trained under his command in contract settlement work. The excellence of instruction offered resulted in the Navy using the School as its major instructional institution for all the Navy's contract termination personnel. His administration was marked by complete cooperation with the Navy Department and was noteworthy for the high standard of instruction provided by the School under his command. The meritorious performance of duty was a real contribution to the readjustment problems not only of the Navy but of the Nation.[5]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 "DONALD ARMSTRONG" (in en). The New York Times. January 15, 1984. https://www.nytimes.com/1984/01/15/obituaries/donald-armstrong.html. 
  2. "BG Donald Armstrong". https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/47185840/donald-armstrong. Retrieved November 27, 2018. 
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 Ancell, R. Manning; Miller, Christine M. (1996). The Biographical Dictionary of World War II Generals and Flag Officers. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press. pp. 8. ISBN 0313295468. 
  4. 4.0 4.1 "Donald Armstrong: Awards By Date of Action". https://valor.militarytimes.com/hero/100988#60776. 
  5. "Legion of Merit". https://valor.militarytimes.com/hero/100988#101762. 

External links[edit | edit source]

Donald Armstrong at Find a Grave

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