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Emil Mazuw, formerly Emil Maschuw, (born September 21, 1900 in Essen, died December 11, 1987 in Karlsruhe) was Landeshauptmann (nominal governor) of the Province of Pomerania from 1940 to 1945. He was a member of the SS since 1933. He held the ranks of SS-Obergruppenführer, General of the Waffen-SS (1944), General of Police (1942) and Ostsee Higher SS and Police leader (1939–1945). He was engaged in euthanasia during the Second World War. He was convicted after the war of crimes associated with abuses of political prisoners and Jews. He was sentenced to 16 years imprisonment.

Life[edit | edit source]

Mazuw, the son of a factory worker, was a trained metal worker. In 1918 he voluntarily joined the Navy, and saw service in the First World War. After the armistice, his ship along with the rest of the German High Seas Fleet was interned by the British at Scapa Flow. After the German Sailors scuttled their ships, they were held in English prisoner of war camps. Mazuw was returned to Germany in 1920. He remained in the Reichsmarine until 1921, then worked as a factory worker until 1925. He remained unemployed until 1932, when he worked as a truck driver in Coburg. His 1932 marriage granted him three children. In 1928 he joined the Sturmabteilung and the Nazi Party (member number: 85231),[1] changing to join the SS in 1930 (member number: 2556).

He was head of SS-Abschnitt XVIII from November 1933 until the beginning of September 1934, when he subsequently became leader of SS-Abschnitt XIII until April 1936.[2] From 1936, Mazuw was a member of the Reichstag of the Nazi Party from the tenth to the eleventh electoral period for the 6th constituency, Pommern. From April 1936 until the beginning of May 1945, Mazuw was leader of the Ostsee SS-Oberabschnitt, and from August 1938 to the end of the same period, he was Higher SS and Police leader (HSSPF) in the district Nord ("North"), in 1940 renamed Ostsee ("Baltic Sea"), with his office in Stettin.[3] Of eighteen HSSPFs in Nazi Germany, Mazuw was the only one who held this position more than five years.[4] From 1940 to 1945 he was Landeshauptmann (nominal governor) of the Province of Pomerania.[3] In this position, together with Pomeranian Gauleiter Franz Schwede-Coburg, he was engaged in the "Aktion T4" euthanasia action, aiding the dispatchment of some 1,400 mental care clients from Pomeranian sanatories in Stralsund, Ueckermünde, Treptow an der Rega, Lauenburg and Meseritz-Obrawalde to an execution site in Piasnitz, Reichsgau Danzig-West Prussia, where they were shot.[5]

Writer Igor Witkowski has speculated that Mazuw was involved in secret programs to develop a Wunderwaffe, a new type of weapon supposed to change the course of the second world war.[6] After the war, Mazuw was held captive. In 1948 he was prosecuted relating to denazification proceedings, and was sentenced to eight years in prison. On the basis of severely abusing political prisoners and Jews in 1933, he received another eight and a half year prison sentence in 1951.[7] He later found employment after his sentence. He died in December 1987 in Karlsruhe.[8]

Decorations[edit | edit source]

SS and Police ranks[2]
Date Rank
April 1932 SS-Sturmbannführer
January 1933 SS-Standartenführer
March 1934 SS-Oberführer
January 1936 SS-Brigadeführer
September 1936 SS-Gruppenführer
SS-Hauptsturmführer of the Reserve (Waffen-SS)
April 1941 SS-Gruppenführer and Lieutenant General of the Police
April 1942 SS-Obergruppenführer and General of the Police
July 1944 General of the Waffen-SS

References[edit | edit source]

  1. "Digitale Bibliothek - Münchener Digitalisierungszentrum" (in German). Bavarian State Library. http://daten.digitale-sammlungen.de/~db/bsb00000146/images/index.html?nativeno=312. Retrieved 2009-09-22. 
  2. 2.0 2.1 "Emil Mazuw" (in Polish). www.dws-xip.pl. http://www.dws-xip.pl/reich/biografie/2556.html. Retrieved 2009-09-22. 
  3. 3.0 3.1 "Provinz Pommern" (in German). territorial.de. http://territorial.de/pommern/prpommer.htm. Retrieved 2009-09-22. 
  4. Koehl (1983), p.354
  5. Browning (2007), p.187
  6. Farell (2006), pp.145-147, citing and referring to Witkowski (2003), pp.236-237
  7. Birn. Die Höheren SS- und Polizeiführer. p.340.
  8. Klee. Das Personenlexikon zum Dritten Reich p. 398.

Bibliography[edit | edit source]

External links[edit | edit source]

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