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Gösta Frykman
Birth name Gösta Oskar Vilhelm Frykman
Born (1909-03-11)11 March 1909
Died 26 February 1974(1974-02-26) (aged 64)
Place of birth Vilhelmina, Sweden
Place of death Saltsjöbaden, Sweden
Allegiance Sweden
Service/branch Swedish Army
Years of service 1933–1961
Rank Lieutenant Colonel
Commands held Swedish UN battalion XI G

Gösta Oskar Vilhelm Frykman (11 March 1909 – 26 February 1974) was a Swedish Army officer.

CareerEdit

Frykman was born in Vilhelmina, Sweden and was the son of head park ranger (överjägmästare) Dan Frykman and Emy (née Forsgrén). He passed studentexamen in 1929 and became a second lieutenant at Älvsborg Regiment (I 15) in 1933. Frykman attended the Royal Swedish Army Staff College from 1940 to 1942, was press officer at the Defence Staff from 1943 to 1946 and was captain in the General Staff Corps in 1944.[1] In 1946 he served as press officer in the camp staff during the Swedish extradition of Baltic soldiers.[2]

He was military organizer at the defense exhibition in Gävle in 1946 and became major at the Infantry Combat School (Infanteriets stridsskola) in 1954. Frykman was lieutenant colonel at Skaraborg Regiment (P 4) in 1957 and was commander of the Swedish UN battalion in Gaza in 1961 which was part of United Nations Emergency Force.[1] The same year his battalion was redeployed to the Congo during the Congo Crisis where he was commander of the Swedish UN battalion XI G from April 1961 to November 1961.[3]

Other workEdit

Frykman was a member of the inquiry within the Swedish National Board of Information (Statens informationsstyrelse) from 1941 to 1943 and chairman of the board of Fastigheter AB Bergslagen.[1]

Personal lifeEdit

On 4 April 1936 he married Ingrid Schollin-Borg (1914–2004),[4] the daughter of captain Peter Schollin-Borg and Märtha (née Liedberg). He was the father of Jan Christer (born 1939), Jan Peter (born 1942), Åke (born 1944), Eva (born 1946) and Ingrid (born 1954).[1] He died on 26 February 1976 in Saltsjöbaden and was buried in Galärvarvskyrkogården in Stockholm.[5][6]

Awards and decorationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

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