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German submarine U-107 (1940)
U-107 at Lorient in November 1941
U-107 at Lorient in November 1941
Career (Nazi Germany)
Name: U-107
Ordered: 24 May 1938
Builder: AG Weser, Bremen
Yard number: 970
Laid down: 6 December 1939
Launched: 2 July 1940
Commissioned: 8 October 1940
Homeport: Lorient, France
Fate: Sunk, 18 August 1944[1]
General characteristics
Class & type: Type IXB U-boat
Displacement: Surfaced 1,051 tons tons
submerged 1,178 tons
Length: Overall 76.5 m (251 ft 0 in)
pressure hull 58.7 m (192 ft 7 in)
Beam: Overall 6.8 m (22 ft 4 in)
pressure hull 4.4 m (14 ft 5 in)
Draught: 4.7 m (15 ft 5 in)
Propulsion: Diesel/Electric, 2x MAN M9V40/46 supercharged 9 cylinder diesel engines, 4,400 hp (3,300kW), 2xSSW GU345/34 double acting electric motors, 1000 hp (740kW)
Speed: Surfaced 33.7 km/h (18.2 knots)
submerged 13.5 km/h (7.3 knots)
Range: Surfaced: 22,200 km (12,000 nmi) at 19 km/h (10 knots)
submerged: 118 km (64 nmi)) at 7 km/h (4 knots)
Test depth: 230 m (750 ft)
Complement: 48 to 56 officers and ratings
Armament:
Service record
Part of: Kriegsmarine:
2nd U-boat Flotilla
Commanders: KrvKpt. Günther Hessler
(October 1940–December 1941)
Kptlt. Harald Gelhaus
(December 1941–June 1943)
Kptlt. Volker Simmermacher
(July 1943–August 1944)
Ltn. Karl-Heinz Fritz
(August 1944)
Operations: 16 patrols
Victories: 37 ships sunk for a total of 207,375 gross register tons (GRT)
Two auxiliary warships sunk for a total of 10,411 GRT
Three ships damaged for a total of 17,392 GRT
One auxiliary warship (USS Rapidan) of 8,246 GRT damaged

German submarine U-107 was a Type IXB U-boat of the Nazi German Kriegsmarine that operated during World War II. Between January 1941 and August 1944, it sailed on 16 active patrols at a time when a U-boat averaged a lifespan of seven to 10 patrols. During that time, U-107 sank 39 Allied ships, in addition to damaging another four ships. It was launched on 2 July 1940, based at the U-boat port of Lorient, with a crew of 53 under the initial command of Günther Hessler. It was later commanded, in order, by Harald Gelhaus, Valker Simmermacher and its final commander, Karl Heinz Fritz.[1]

Combat actions[]

First patrol[]

Date Name Flag Tonnage (GRT) Convoy Position
3 February 1941 Empire Citizen  United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland 4,683 Convoy OB 279 58°12′N 23°22′W / 58.2°N 23.367°W / 58.2; -23.367
3 February 1941 Crispin  Royal Navy 5,051 Convoy OB 279 56°38′N 20°05′W / 56.633°N 20.083°W / 56.633; -20.083
6 February 1941 Maplecourt  Canada 3,388 Convoy SC 20 57°33′N 17°24′W / 57.55°N 17.4°W / 57.55; -17.4
23 February 1941 SS Manistee  Royal Navy 5,360 Convoy OB 288 58°13′N 21°33′W / 58.217°N 21.55°W / 58.217; -21.55

Second patrol and most successful period[]

Date Name Flag Tonnage (GRT) Convoy Position
8 April 1941 Helena Margareta  United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland 3,316 Convoy OG 57 33°00′N 23°52′W / 33°N 23.867°W / 33; -23.867
8 April 1941 Eskdene  United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland 3,829 Convoy OG 57 34°43′N 24°21′W / 34.717°N 24.35°W / 34.717; -24.35
9 April 1941 Harpathian  United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland 4,671 Convoy OG 57 32°22′N 22°53′W / 32.367°N 22.883°W / 32.367; -22.883
9 April 1941 Duffield  United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland 8,516 Convoy OG 57 31°13′N 23°24′W / 31.217°N 23.4°W / 31.217; -23.4
21 April 1941 Calchas  United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland 10,305 23°50′N 27°00′W / 23.833°N 27°W / 23.833; -27
30 April 1941 Lassell  United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland 7,417 Convoy OB 309 12°55′N 28°56′W / 12.917°N 28.933°W / 12.917; -28.933
17 May 1941 Marisa  Netherlands 8,029 06°10′N 18°09′W / 6.167°N 18.15°W / 6.167; -18.15
18 May 1941 Piako  United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland 8,286 07°52′N 14°57′W / 7.867°N 14.95°W / 7.867; -14.95
27 May 1941 Colonial  United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland 5,108 Convoy OB 318 09°13′N 15°09′W / 9.217°N 15.15°W / 9.217; -15.15
28 May 1941 Papalemos  Greece 3,748 08°06′N 16°18′W / 8.1°N 16.3°W / 8.1; -16.3
31 May 1941 Sire  United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland 5,664 08°50′N 15°30′W / 8.833°N 15.5°W / 8.833; -15.5
1 June 1941 Alfred Jones  United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland 5,013 Convoy OB 320 08°00′N 15°00′W / 8°N 15°W / 8; -15
8 June 1941 Adda  United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland 7,816 Convoy OB 323 08°30′N 14°39′W / 8.5°N 14.65°W / 8.5; -14.65
13 June 1941 Pandias  Greece 4,981 07°49′N 23°28′W / 7.817°N 23.467°W / 7.817; -23.467

Third Patrol[]

Date Name Flag Tonnage (GRT) Convoy Position
24 September 1941 Dixcove  United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland 3,790 Convoy SL 87 31°12′N 23°41′W / 31.2°N 23.683°W / 31.2; -23.683
24 September 1941 Lafian  United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland 4,876 Convoy SL 87 31°12′N 23°32′W / 31.2°N 23.533°W / 31.2; -23.533
24 September 1941 John Holt  United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland 4,975 Convoy SL 87 31°12′N 23°32′W / 31.2°N 23.533°W / 31.2; -23.533

Fifth Patrol[]

Date Name Flag Tonnage (GRT) Convoy Position
31 January 1942 San Arcadio  United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland 7,419 38°10′N 63°50′W / 38.167°N 63.833°W / 38.167; -63.833
6 February 1942 Major Wheeler  United States 3,431 E of Cape Hatteras
21 February 1942 Egda  Norway 10,068 Convoy ON 65 41°12′N 52°55′W / 41.2°N 52.917°W / 41.2; -52.917
Damaged

Sixth Patrol[]

U-107 meets a supply ship in the South Atlantic

Date Name Flag Tonnage (GRT) Convoy Position
29 May 1942 Western Head  United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland 2,599 19°57′N 74°18′W / 19.95°N 74.3°W / 19.95; -74.3
1 June 1942 Bushranger  Panama 4,536 18°15′N 81°25′W / 18.25°N 81.417°W / 18.25; -81.417
7 June 1942 Castilla  Honduras 3,910 20°15′N 83°18′W / 20.25°N 83.3°W / 20.25; -83.3
8 June 1942 Suwied  United States 3,249 20°00′N 84°48′W / 20°N 84.8°W / 20; -84.8
10 June 1942 Merrimack  United States 2,606 19°47′N 85°55′W / 19.783°N 85.917°W / 19.783; -85.917
19 June 1942 Cheerio  United States 35 18°02′N 67°40′W / 18.033°N 67.667°W / 18.033; -67.667
26 June 1942 Jagersfontein  Netherlands 10,083 31°56′N 54°48′W / 31.933°N 54.8°W / 31.933; -54.8

Eighth Patrol[]

Date Name Flag Tonnage (GRT) Convoy Position
3 September 1942 Hollinside  United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland 4,172 38°00′N 09°00′W / 38°N 9°W / 38; -9
3 September 1942 Penrose  United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland 4,393 38°00′N 09°00′W / 38°N 9°W / 38; -9
7 October 1942 Andalucia Star  United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland 14,943 06°38′N 15°46′W / 6.633°N 15.767°W / 6.633; -15.767

Ninth Patrol[]

  • 4 March 1943, came under attack from an unidentified Allied aircraft.
Moderately damaged by the attack.
  • 22 March 1943 at 14:35 it came under attack from another unidentified Allied aircraft
Undamaged
Date Name Flag Tonnage (GRT) Convoy Position
22 February 1943 Roxborough Castle  United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland 7,801 38°12′N 26°22′W / 38.2°N 26.367°W / 38.2; -26.367
13 March 1943 Oporto  United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland 2,352 Convoy OS 44 42°45′N 13°31′W / 42.75°N 13.517°W / 42.75; -13.517
13 March 1943 Marcella  United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland 4,592 Convoy OS 44 42°45′N 13°31′W / 42.75°N 13.517°W / 42.75; -13.517
13 March 1943 Sembilangan  Netherlands 4,990 Convoy OS 44 42°45′N 13°31′W / 42.75°N 13.517°W / 42.75; -13.517
13 March 1943 SS Clan Alpine  United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland 5,442 Convoy OS 44 42°45′N 13°31′W / 42.75°N 13.517°W / 42.75; -13.517

Tenth Patrol[]

Date Name Flag Tonnage (GRT) Convoy Position
1 May 1943 Port Victor  United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland 12,411 47°49′N 22°02′W / 47.817°N 22.033°W / 47.817; -22.033

Eleventh Patrol[]

Date Name Flag Tonnage (GRT) Convoy Position
28 August 1943 SS Albert Gallatin  United States 7,176 Off Savannah, Georgia
Damaged
11 September 1943 USS Rapidan (AO-18)  United States Navy 8,246 Convoy NG 385 32°39′N 79°43′W / 32.65°N 79.717°W / 32.65; -79.717
Damaged

Fifteenth Patrol[]

Date Name Flag Tonnage (GRT) Convoy Position
13 June 1944 Lark  United States 148 43°00′N 65°12′W / 43°N 65.2°W / 43; -65.2
Damaged

Sixteenth and final patrol[]

See also[]

References[]

Notes
  1. Kemp, Paul: U-Boats Destroyed, German Submarine Losses in the World Wars. 1997. p. 210. Arms and Armour. ISBN 1-85409-515-3
  2. Campbell, John Naval Weapons of World War Two ISBN 0-87021-459-4 pp.248&249
  3. "The Type IXB boat U-107 - German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net". uboat.net. http://www.uboat.net/boats/u107.htm. Retrieved 22 February 2010. 
  4. Landers, Brian. "Caught on the Surface". Cudham: Kelsey Publishing. pp. 16–22. ISSN 0143-7240. 
Bibliography


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