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German submarine U-876
Career (Nazi Germany)
Name: U-876
Ordered: 25 August 1941
Builder: DeSchiMAG AG Weser, Bremen
Yard number: 1084
Laid down: 5 June 1943
Launched: 29 February 1944
Commissioned: 24 May 1944
Fate: Scuttled on 3 May 1945
Status: Broken up in 1947
General characteristics
Class & type: Type IXD2 submarine
Displacement:
  • 1,610 t (1,580 long tons) surfaced
  • 1,799 t (1,771 long tons) submerged
Length:
  • 87.58 m (287 ft 4 in) o/a
  • 68.50 m (224 ft 9 in) pressure hull
  • Beam:
  • 7.50 m (24 ft 7 in) o/a
  • 4.40 m (14 ft 5 in) pressure hull
  • Height: 10.20 m (33 ft 6 in)
    Draught: 5.35 m (17 ft 7 in)
    Installed power:
    • 9,000 PS (6,620 kW; 8,880 bhp) (diesels)
    • 1,000 PS (740 kW; 990 shp) (electric)
    Propulsion:
  • 2 shafts
  • 2 × diesel engines
  • 2 × electric motors
  • Speed:
  • 20.8 knots (38.5 km/h; 23.9 mph) surfaced
  • 6.9 knots (12.8 km/h; 7.9 mph) submerged
  • Range:
  • 12,750 nmi (23,610 km; 14,670 mi) at 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph) surfaced
  • 57 nmi (106 km; 66 mi) at 4 knots (7.4 km/h; 4.6 mph) submerged
  • Test depth: 230 m (750 ft)
    Complement: 66
    Armament:
    Service record
    Part of:
    Commanders:
    Operations: No patrols
    Victories: None

    German submarine U-876 was a long-range Type IXD2 U-boat built for Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine during World War II.

    She was ordered on 25 August 1941, and was laid down on 5 June 1943 at DeSchiMAG AG Weser, Bremen, as yard number 1084. She was launched on 29 February 1944 and commissioned under the command of Kapitänleutnant Rolf Bahn on 24 May 1944.[3]

    Design[edit | edit source]

    German Type IXD2 submarines were considerably larger than the original Type IXs. U-876 had a displacement of 1,610 tonnes (1,580 long tons) when at the surface and 1,799 tonnes (1,771 long tons) while submerged.[4] The U-boat had a total length of 87.58 m (287 ft 4 in), a pressure hull length of 68.50 m (224 ft 9 in), a beam of 7.50 m (24 ft 7 in), a height of 10.20 m (33 ft 6 in), and a draught of 5.35 m (17 ft 7 in). The submarine was powered by two MAN M 9 V 40/46 supercharged four-stroke, nine-cylinder diesel engines plus two MWM RS34.5S six-cylinder four-stroke diesel engines for cruising, producing a total of 9,000 metric horsepower (6,620 kW; 8,880 shp) for use while surfaced, two Siemens-Schuckert 2 GU 345/34 double-acting electric motors producing a total of 1,000 shaft horsepower (1,010 PS; 750 kW) for use while submerged. She had two shafts and two 1.85 m (6 ft) propellers. The boat was capable of operating at depths of up to 200 metres (660 ft).[4]

    The submarine had a maximum surface speed of 20.8 knots (38.5 km/h; 23.9 mph) and a maximum submerged speed of 6.9 knots (12.8 km/h; 7.9 mph).[4] When submerged, the boat could operate for 121 nautical miles (224 km; 139 mi) at 2 knots (3.7 km/h; 2.3 mph); when surfaced, she could travel 12,750 nautical miles (23,610 km; 14,670 mi) at 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph). U-876 was fitted with six 53.3 cm (21 in) torpedo tubes (four fitted at the bow and two at the stern), 24 torpedoes, one 10.5 cm (4.13 in) SK C/32 naval gun, 150 rounds, and a 3.7 cm (1.5 in) with 2575 rounds as well as two 2 cm (0.79 in) anti-aircraft guns with 8100 rounds. The boat had a complement of fifty-five.[4]

    Service history[edit | edit source]

    On 9 April 1945, U-876 was damaged by bombs in a British air raid.[3]

    U-876 was scuttled at Eckernförde, on 3 May 1945, as part of Operation Regenbogen. Her wreck was raised and broken up in 1947.[3]

    References[edit | edit source]

    1. Busch & Röll 1997, p. 384.
    2. Helgason, Guðmundur. "Rolf Bahn". http://uboat.net/men/commanders/29.html. Retrieved 13 April 2016. 
    3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 Helgason, Guðmundur. "U-876". http://uboat.net/boats/u876.htm. Retrieved 13 April 2016. 
    4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 Gröner 1991, pp. 74-75.

    Bibliography[edit | edit source]

    • Busch, Rainer; Röll, Hans-Joachim (1997) (in German). Der U-Boot-Bau auf deutschen Werften. II. Hamburg, Berlin, Bonn: Mittler. ISBN 3-8132-0509-6. 
    • Busch, Rainer; Röll, Hans-Joachim (1999) (in German). Deutsche U-Boot-Verluste von September 1939 bis Mai 1945. IV. Hamburg, Berlin, Bonn: Mittler. ISBN 3-8132-0514-2. 
    • Gröner, ErichExpression error: Unexpected < operator. (1991). U-boats and Mine Warfare Vessels. 2. London: Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-593-4. 
    • Sharpe, Peter (1998). U-Boat Fact File. Great Britain: Midland Publishing. ISBN 1-85780-072-9. 

    External links[edit | edit source]



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