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W.29
Hansa-Brandenburg W.29 of Imperial Japanese Navy
Role Floatplane fighter
Manufacturer Hansa und Brandenburgische Flugzeug-Werke
Designer Ernst Heinkel
First flight 27 March 1918
Introduction 1918
Primary user Kaiserliche Marine
Number built 78

The Hansa-Brandenburg W.29 was a German monoplane fighter floatplane which served in the closing months of World War I, from bases on the North Sea coast.

It was based on the W.12 biplane that it was designed to replace. The monoplane configuration created less drag, and thus gave greater speed.

Operators[edit | edit source]

 Austria-Hungary
  • Austria-Hungary placed an order for 25 W.29s, powered by 185 hp (138 kW) Austro-Daimler engines, to be built under license by Ufag at Budapest. One completed by the end of World War I.[1]
Flag of Denmark.svg Denmark
  • Royal Danish Navy - purchased one W.29 from Germany in 1919, building a further 15 powered by the 150 hp Benz or 160 hp (120 kW) Orlogsværftet O-V six-cylinder inline engine under license at the Orlogsværftet (Danish Royal Naval Dockyard) as the HM.1 from 1921 to 1927, the type remaining in service until 1930, being replaced by the Heinkel HE 8.[2]
 Finland
 German Empire
 Hungary
  • Hungarian Soviet Republic ordered production of the W.29 at Ufag to restart. At least two were completed, which together with the single W.29 completed for Austria-Hungary, were operated by the 9th Floatplane Squadron operating from Cspel near Budapest.[1]
 Japan
 Netherlands
 Norway

Specifications (W.29)[edit | edit source]

Data from Encyclopedia of Military Aircraft[5]

General characteristics

  • Crew: Two (pilot & observer/gunner)
  • Length: 9.38 m (30 ft 8 in)
  • Wingspan: 13.50 m (44 ft 4 in)
  • Height: 3.00 m (9 ft 11 in)
  • Wing area: 32.2 m² [6] (348 ft²)
  • Empty weight: 1,000 kg [6] (2,200 lb)
  • Loaded weight: 1,494 kg (3,285 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Benz Bz.III 6-cylinder water-cooled inline engine, 112 kW (150 hp)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 175 km/h (95 kn, 109 mph)
  • Range: 520 km (281 nmi, 320 mi)
  • Service ceiling: 5,000 m (16,400 ft)
  • Endurance: 4 hrs
  • Climb to 1,000 m (3,280 ft): 6 min[6]

Armament

  • 1 or 2 × fixed, forward-firing 7.92 mm (0.312 in) LMG 08/15 machine guns
  • 1 × flexible 7.92 mm (0.312 in) Parabellum MG14 in rear cockpit
  • See also[edit | edit source]

    References[edit | edit source]

    Notes
    1. 1.0 1.1 Owers Air Enthusiast September/October 1997, pp. 29–30.
    2. Owers Air Enthusiast September/October 1997, p. 30.
    3. Owers Air Enthusiast September/October 1997, p. 31.
    4. Owers Air Enthusiast September/October 1997, p. 34.
    5. Jackson, Robert, The Encyclopedia of Military Aircraft, Parragon, 2002. ISBN 0-7525-8130-9
    6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 Gray and Thetford 1962, p.77-78.
    Bibliography
    • Gray, Peter and Thetford, Owen. German Aircraft of the First World War. London: Putnam, 1962.
    • Owers, Colin A. "Zeebrugge's Hornets: The Brandendurg Monoplanes: Part One". Air Enthusiast, No. 71, September/October 1997. pp. 25–35. ISSN 0143-5450.

    External links[edit | edit source]

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