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Harry Edward de Robillard Wetherall
Born 1889
Died 1979 (aged 89–90) (aged 89 or 90)
Allegiance United Kingdom United Kingdom
Service/branch Flag of the British Army.svg British Army
Rank Lieutenant-General
Commands held 4th Bn Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry
1st Battalion, York and Lancaster Regiment
19th Brigade
11th African Division
East Africa Force
Ceylon
Battles/wars World War I
World War II
Awards Knight Commander of the Order of the British Empire
Companion of the Order of the Bath
Distinguished Service Order
Military Cross

Lieutenant General Sir Harry Edward de Robillard Wetherall KBE CB DSO MC (1889–1979) was an officer in the British Army during World War I and World War II.

Military career[edit | edit source]

Wetherall was commissioned into the Gloucestershire Regiment in 1909.[1]

He served in World War I in France and Belgium becoming Commanding Officer of 4th Bn Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry in 1917.[1] In March 1918 he was seriously wounded by a piece of shell in his neck.[2]

After the War he became a Lieutenant Colonel in the Machine Gun Corps and then a General Staff Officer for Weapon Training in Scottish Command in 1930.[1] He was appointed Commanding Officer of 1st Battalion, York and Lancaster Regiment in 1936 and then Commander of 19th Brigade in 1938.[1]

He served in World War II as General Officer Commanding 11th African Division in Abyssinia in 1941:[1] he was part of the "Southern Front" for this campaign and commanded the Division during the advance from Kenya, through Italian Somaliland, and into Ethiopia. In late 1941, with the campaign all but over, the 11th African Division was disbanded and he became General Officer Commanding the East Africa Force.[1] He was then appointed General Officer Commanding, Ceylon in 1943.[1]

After the War he became Commander-in-Chief, Ceylon at a time when the Sri Lankan independence struggle was ongoing; he retired in 1946.[1]

References[edit | edit source]

Military offices
Preceded by
Sir Alan Cunningham
GOC East Africa Force
August 1941–December 1941
Succeeded by
Sir William Platt
(As GOC East Africa Command)

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