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Dr Hugo Johannes Blaschke (14 November 1881 – 6 December 1959) was a German dental surgeon notable for being Adolf Hitler’s personal dentist from 1933 to April 1945 and for being the chief dentist on the staff of Heinrich Himmler with the rank of SS-Brigadeführer.

Biography[edit | edit source]

Blaschke was born in Neustadt and studied dentistry in Berlin and at the University of Pennsylvania. He trained as a dentist in London and during World War I he served as a military dentist. After treating Hermann Göring, he joined the Nazi party in 1931 and then the SS. As well as Hitler, he also treated Eva Braun, Joseph Goebbels and Heinrich Himmler.

He was interrogated by the Americans after the war about Hitler’s dental treatment in the hope that this would lead to the identification of his remains. He stated that he fitted a large dental bridge to Hitler's upper jaw in 1933 and that on 10 November 1944 he carried out surgery to cut off part of the bridge due to a gum infection that was causing Hitler severe toothache. In May 1945 Soviet officers showed a dental bridge to Blaschke's technician Fritz Echtmann and his dental assistant Käthe Heusermann and they both identified it as being Hitler's.[1] Blaschke also reconstructed the dental records of Martin Bormann from memory and these were later used to identify his skeletal remains which were discovered in Berlin in 1972.

After his release from captivity in 1948 Blaschke continued to practise as a dentist in Nuremberg and died there aged 78.[2]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Ian Kershaw (2000). Hitler 1936-1945: Nemesis. Penguin Press. ISBN 0-393-32252-1. 
  2. Joachimsthaler, Anton (1999) [1995]. The Last Days of Hitler: The Legends, The Evidence, The Truth. Brockhampton Press. ISBN 1-86019-902-X. 

External links[edit | edit source]

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