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James C. Binnicker
9th Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force (1986-1990)
Born July 23, 1938(1938-07-23) (age 82)
Place of birth Orangeburg, South Carolina
Allegiance United States
Service/branch  United States Air Force
Years of service 1957–1990
Rank Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force
Battles/wars Vietnam War
Awards Air Force Distinguished Service Medal
Legion of Merit
Silver Star
Other work CEO Air Force Enlisted Village

Chief Master Sergeant James C. Binnicker (born July 23, 1938)[1] was the ninth appointed Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force (CMSAF) — the highest non-commissioned officer position in the United States Air Force.

Biography[edit | edit source]

James Binnicker was born in Orangeburg, South Carolina, where he graduated from Aiken High School in 1956.

Air Force career[edit | edit source]

He entered the Air Force in August 1957. His first assignment was to the 96th Air Refueling Squadron, Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma, as a life support specialist. His early years include tours in base and wing operations in Hawaii, North Dakota, Georgia, North Carolina, Vietnam, and Taiwan. He served as the Senior Enlisted Advisor for 12th Air Force, Headquarters Pacific Air Forces (PACAF), and Headquarters Tactical Air Command (TAC). He also represented the Air Force as Senior Enlisted Advisor on the President's Commission on Military Compensation. In February 1985, Chief Binnicker was selected for the 33-year extended tenure program.

Binnicker served as the Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force from July 1, 1986 to July 1990.

Post-military career[edit | edit source]

Since March 2000, Binnicker has been the president and CEO of the Air Force Enlisted Village (AFEV), a non-profit charity located in Fort Walton Beach, Florida, that provides a home for the surviving spouses of enlisted military personnel.[2] Binnicker has been a member of the AFEV Board of Directors since 1992.[3]

Awards and decorations[edit | edit source]

Air Force Distinguished Service Medal
Width-44 crimson ribbon with a pair of width-2 white stripes on the edges Legion of Merit
Width-44 scarlet ribbon with width-4 ultramarine blue stripe at center, surrounded by width-1 white stripes. Width-1 white stripes are at the edges. Bronze Star Medal
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Width-44 crimson ribbon with two width-8 white stripes at distance 4 from the edges.
Meritorious Service Medal with three bronze oak leaf clusters
Joint Service Commendation Medal
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Air Force Commendation Medal with bronze oak leaf cluster
Presidential Unit Citation
V
Silver oak leaf cluster
Air Force Outstanding Unit Award with Valor device and silver oak leaf cluster
Air Force Organizational Excellence Award
Silver oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Air Force Good Conduct Medal with silver and two bronze oak leaf clusters
Army Good Conduct Medal
Width=44 scarlet ribbon with a central width-4 golden yellow stripe, flanked by pairs of width-1 scarlet, white, Old Glory blue, and white stripes National Defense Service Medal
Bronze star
Bronze star
Bronze star
Vietnam Service Medal with three bronze service stars
Air Force Overseas Short Tour Service Ribbon
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Air Force Overseas Long Tour Service Ribbon with bronze oak leaf cluster
Silver oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Air Force Longevity Service Award with silver and bronze oak leaf clusters
Bronze oak leaf cluster
Bronze oak leaf cluster
NCO Professional Military Education Graduate Ribbon with two bronze oak leaf clusters
Small Arms Expert Marksmanship Ribbon
Air Force Training Ribbon
Vietnam Gallantry Cross Unit Award
Vietnam Campaign Medal

Notes[edit | edit source]

  1. [1]
  2. Jordan, Jodi L. (February 9, 2007). "Air Force Enlisted Village earns 4-star rating". Air Force Link. United States Air Force. Archived from the original on 2012-12-12. http://archive.is/yTGe. Retrieved 2008-02-03. 
  3. "AFEV Staff Directors: James C. Binnicker, CASP". Air Force Enlisted Village. http://www.afenlistedwidows.org/content.php?page=7. Retrieved 2008-02-03. 

References[edit | edit source]

 This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Government document "http://www.af.mil/bios/bio.asp?bioID=4693".

Succession[edit | edit source]

Military offices
Preceded by
Sam E. Parish
Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force
1986–1990
Succeeded by
Gary R. Pfingston

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