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Japanese submarine I-184
I-176
Sister ship I-176 at sea, 1942
Career (Empire of Japan) Naval Ensign of Japan.svg
Name: I-182
Builder: Yokosuka Naval Arsenal
Laid down: 1941?, as I-84
Launched: 12 December 1943
Completed: 15 October 1943
Renamed: 1942, as I-184
Struck: 10 August 1944
Fate: Sunk by USS Wadsworth, 1 September 1943
General characteristics
Class & type: Kaidai-class submarine (KD7 Type)
Displacement:
  • 1,862 t (1,833 long tons) surfaced
  • 2,644 t (2,602 long tons) submerged
Length: 105.5 m (346 ft 2 in)
Beam: 8.25 m (27 ft 1 in)
Draft: 4.6 m (15 ft 1 in)
Installed power:
  • 8,000 bhp (6,000 kW) (diesels)
  • 1,800 hp (1,300 kW) (electric motors)
Propulsion:
  • Diesel-electric
  • 2 × diesel engines
  • 2 × electric motors
  • Speed:
  • 23 knots (43 km/h; 26 mph) surfaced
  • 8 knots (15 km/h; 9.2 mph) submerged
  • Range:
  • 8,000 nmi (15,000 km; 9,200 mi) at 16 knots (30 km/h; 18 mph) surfaced
  • 50 nmi (93 km; 58 mi) at 5 knots (9.3 km/h; 5.8 mph) submerged
  • Test depth: 80 m (260 ft)
    Complement: 86
    Armament:

    The Japanese submarine I-184 was a Kaidai-class attack submarine of the KD7 sub-class built for the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) during the 1940s. She was sunk with all hands by an American torpedo bomber during the Battle of the Philippine Sea in mid-1944.

    Design and descriptionEdit

    The submarines of the KD7 sub-class were medium-range attack submarines developed from the preceding KD6 sub-class. They displaced 1,862 metric tons (1,833 long tons) surfaced and 2,644 metric tons (2,602 long tons) submerged. The submarines were 105.5 meters (346 ft 2 in) long, had a beam of 8.25 meters (27 ft 1 in) and a draft of 4.6 meters (15 ft 1 in). The boats had a diving depth of 80 m (260 ft) and a complement of 86 officers and crewmen.[1]

    For surface running, the boats were powered by two 4,000-brake-horsepower (2,983 kW) diesel engines, each driving one propeller shaft. When submerged each propeller was driven by a 900-horsepower (671 kW) electric motor. They could reach 23 knots (43 km/h; 26 mph) on the surface and 8 knots (15 km/h; 9.2 mph) underwater. On the surface, the KD7s had a range of 8,000 nautical miles (15,000 km; 9,200 mi) at 16 knots (30 km/h; 18 mph); submerged, they had a range of 50 nmi (93 km; 58 mi) at 5 knots (9.3 km/h; 5.8 mph).[2]

    The boats were armed with six internal 53.3 cm (21.0 in) torpedo tubes, all in the bow. They carried one reload for each tube; a total of a dozen torpedoes. They were originally intended to be armed with two twin-gun mounts for the 25 mm (1.0 in) Type 96 anti-aircraft gun, but a 120 mm (4.7 in) deck gun for combat on the surface was substituted for one 25 mm mount during construction.[3]

    Construction and careerEdit

    Built by the Yokosuka Naval Arsenal, the boat was laid down as I-84 and renamed I-184 in 1942.[1] She was launched on 12 December 1942 and completed on 15 October 1943.[4] The boat was sunk with the loss of all 96 officers and crewmen aboard by a Grumman TBF Avenger torpedo bomber from the escort carrier USS Suwanee 20 miles (32 km) southeast of Saipan on 19 June 1944. I-184 was stricken from the Navy List on 10 August 1944.[5]

    NotesEdit

    1. 1.0 1.1 Carpenter & Dorr, p. 105
    2. Chesneau, p. 199
    3. Bagnasco, pp. 183, 186
    4. Jentschura, Jung & Mickel, p. 172
    5. Hackett & Kingsepp

    ReferencesEdit

    • Bagnasco, Erminio (1977). Submarines of World War Two. Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press. ISBN 0-87021-962-6. 
    • Carpenter, Dorr B. & Polmar, Norman (1986). Submarines of the Imperial Japanese Navy 1904–1945. London: Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-396-6. 
    • Chesneau, Roger, ed (1980). Conway's All the World's Fighting Ships 1922–1946. Greenwich, UK: Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-146-7. 
    • Hackett, Bob; Kingsepp, Sander (2001). "IJN Submarine I-184: Tabular Record of Movement". combinedfleet.com. http://www.combinedfleet.com/I-184.htm. Retrieved 8 November 2015. 
    • Jentschura, Hansgeorg; Jung, Dieter & Mickel, Peter (1977). Warships of the Imperial Japanese Navy, 1869–1945. Annapolis, Maryland: United States Naval Institute. ISBN 0-87021-893-X. 


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