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Japanese submarine I-185
I-176
Sister ship I-176 at sea, 1942
Career (Empire of Japan) Naval Ensign of Japan.svg
Name: I-185
Builder: Yokosuka Naval Arsenal
Laid down: 9 February 1942, as I-85
Launched: 16 September 1943
Completed: 23 September 1943
Renamed: 1942, as I-182
Struck: 10 September 1944
Fate: Sunk by USS Newcomb, 22 June 1944
General characteristics
Class & type: Kaidai-class submarine (KD7 Type)
Displacement:
  • 1,862 t (1,833 long tons) surfaced
  • 2,644 t (2,602 long tons) submerged
Length: 105.5 m (346 ft 2 in)
Beam: 8.25 m (27 ft 1 in)
Draft: 4.6 m (15 ft 1 in)
Installed power:
  • 8,000 bhp (6,000 kW) (diesels)
  • 1,800 hp (1,300 kW) (electric motors)
Propulsion:
  • Diesel-electric
  • 2 × diesel engines
  • 2 × electric motors
  • Speed:
  • 23 knots (43 km/h; 26 mph) surfaced
  • 8 knots (15 km/h; 9.2 mph) submerged
  • Range:
  • 8,000 nmi (15,000 km; 9,200 mi) at 16 knots (30 km/h; 18 mph) surfaced
  • 50 nmi (93 km; 58 mi) at 5 knots (9.3 km/h; 5.8 mph) submerged
  • Test depth: 80 m (260 ft)
    Complement: 86
    Armament:

    The Japanese submarine I-185 was a Kaidai-class attack submarine of the KD7 sub-class built for the Imperial Japanese Navy (IJN) during the 1940s. She was sunk with all hands by an American destroyer during the Battle of the Philippine Sea in mid-1944.

    Design and descriptionEdit

    The submarines of the KD7 sub-class were medium-range attack submarines developed from the preceding KD6 sub-class. They displaced 1,862 metric tons (1,833 long tons) surfaced and 2,644 metric tons (2,602 long tons) submerged. The submarines were 105.5 meters (346 ft 2 in) long, had a beam of 8.25 meters (27 ft 1 in) and a draft of 4.6 meters (15 ft 1 in). The boats had a diving depth of 80 m (260 ft) and a complement of 86 officers and crewmen.[1]

    For surface running, the boats were powered by two 4,000-brake-horsepower (2,983 kW) diesel engines, each driving one propeller shaft. When submerged each propeller was driven by a 900-horsepower (671 kW) electric motor. They could reach 23 knots (43 km/h; 26 mph) on the surface and 8 knots (15 km/h; 9.2 mph) underwater. On the surface, the KD7s had a range of 8,000 nautical miles (15,000 km; 9,200 mi) at 16 knots (30 km/h; 18 mph); submerged, they had a range of 50 nmi (93 km; 58 mi) at 5 knots (9.3 km/h; 5.8 mph).[2]

    The boats were armed with six internal 53.3 cm (21.0 in) torpedo tubes, all in the bow. They carried one reload for each tube; a total of a dozen torpedoes. They were originally intended to be armed with two twin-gun mounts for the 25 mm (1.0 in) Type 96 anti-aircraft gun, but a 120 mm (4.7 in) deck gun for combat on the surface was substituted for one 25 mm mount during construction.[3]

    Construction and careerEdit

    Built by the Yokosuka Naval Arsenal, the boat was laid down on 9 February 1942[4] as I-85 and renamed I-185 in 1942. She was launched on 16 September 1943 and completed on 23 September.[1] The boat was sunk with the loss of all 95 officers and crewmen aboard by the destroyer USS Newcomb on 22 June 1944 near Saipan. I-185 was stricken from the Navy List on 10 September 1944.[4]

    NotesEdit

    1. 1.0 1.1 Carpenter & Dorr, p. 105
    2. Chesneau, p. 199
    3. Bagnasco, pp. 183, 186
    4. 4.0 4.1 Hackett & Kingsepp

    ReferencesEdit

    • Bagnasco, Erminio (1977). Submarines of World War Two. Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press. ISBN 0-87021-962-6. 
    • Carpenter, Dorr B. & Polmar, Norman (1986). Submarines of the Imperial Japanese Navy 1904–1945. London: Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-396-6. 
    • Chesneau, Roger, ed (1980). Conway's All the World's Fighting Ships 1922–1946. Greenwich, UK: Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-146-7. 
    • Hackett, Bob; Kingsepp, Sander (2011). "IJN Submarine I-185: Tabular Record of Movement". combinedfleet.com. http://www.combinedfleet.com/I-185.htm. Retrieved 8 November 2015. 
    • Jentschura, Hansgeorg; Jung, Dieter & Mickel, Peter (1977). Warships of the Imperial Japanese Navy, 1869–1945. Annapolis, Maryland: United States Naval Institute. ISBN 0-87021-893-X. 


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