FANDOM

251,256 Pages

</td></tr></td></tr>
Joessel-class submarine
FMIB 37151 Sous-Marin Joessel.jpeg
Joessel, 1913
Class overview
Name: Joessel class
Operators:
Preceded by: Armide class
Succeeded by: Lagrange class
Built: 1913 – 1919
Planned: 8
Completed: 2
Cancelled: 6
Retired: 2
General characteristics
Type: Submarine
Displacement:
  • 870 tonnes (856 long tons) (surfaced)
  • 1,247 tonnes (1,227 long tons) (submerged)
Length: 74 m (242 ft 9 in)
Beam: 6.4 m (21 ft 0 in)
Draught: 3.62 m (11 ft 11 in)
Propulsion:
  • 2 × diesel engines, 2,700 hp (2,000 kW)
  • 2 × electric motors, 1,640 hp (1,220 kW)
Speed:
  • 16.5 knots (30.6 km/h) (surfaced)
  • 11 knots (20 km/h) (submerged)
  • Range:
  • 4,300 nautical miles (8,000 km) at 10 knots (19 km/h)
  • 125 nautical miles (232 km) at 5 knots (9.3 km/h) (submerged)
  • Test depth: 50 m (160 ft)
    Complement: 47
    Armament:
    • 8 × 450 mm (17.7 in) torpedo tubes
    • 2 × 75 mm (3.0 in) guns

    The Joessel-class submarines were a class of two diesel-electric attack submarines built for the French Navy during World War I and the interwar period. They were built in the Arsenal de Cherbourg from 1913 to 1919, entered the French Marine Nationale from 1918 to 1924 and served until 1936.

    DesignEdit

    The Joessel class was ordered as part of the French fleet's expansion program from 1913 to 1914.[1][2] The ships were designed by Jean Simonot, as a slight modification of his previous project, Gustave Zédé, using two Parsons steam turbines with a power of 2,000 hp (1,491 kW).[3] During construction, though, the idea was abandoned and the ships were instead equipped with diesel engines.[1][3]

    74 m (242 ft 9 in) long, with a beam of 6.4 m (21 ft 0 in) and a draught of 3.62 m (11 ft 11 in),[1][4] Joessel-class submarines could dive up to 50 m (160 ft). The submarine had a surfaced displacement of 870 tonnes (856 long tons) and a submerged displacement of 1,247 tonnes (1,227 long tons).[1][4] Propulsion while surfaced was provided by two 2,000 hp (1,491 kW) diesel motors built by the Swiss manufacturer Schneider-Carels and two 1,640 hp (1,223 kW) electric motors.[3][4] The submarines' electrical propulsion allowed it to attain speeds of 11 knots (20 km/h; 13 mph) while submerged and 16.5 knots (30.6 km/h; 19.0 mph) on the surface.[5] Their surfaced range was 4,300 nautical miles (8,000 km) at 10 knots (19 km/h), with a submerged range of 125 nautical miles (232 km) at 5 knots (9.3 km/h).[1][5]

    The ships were armed with eight 450 mm torpedo tubes (four in the bow, two stern and two external), with a total of 10 torpedoes and two 75 mm (3.0 in) guns.[4][5][6] The crew of one ship consisted of four officers and 43 of officers and seamen.[1][3]

    ShipsEdit

    Two Joessel-class submarines were built in the Arsenal de Cherbourg, France.[4][7] The ships were laid down in November 1913,[1] launched between 1917 and 1919,[4][5] and completed in 1920.[1] Joessel received the pennant number Q109, and Fulton, Q110. It was planned to build six additional ships of this type, numbered Q115 to Q120, but the order was canceled in the course of World War I.[2][3]

    Joessel-class submarines
    Name Laid down Launched Commissioned Fate
    Joessel November 1913 21 July 1917 February 1920 Stricken in May 1936.[3]
    Fulton November 1913 1 April 1919 July 1920 Stricken in May 1936.[3]

    ServiceEdit

    French submarine Joessel

    Joessel

    After completion, the ships were refitted: they received a new kiosk, bridge and two periscopes of 7.5 m (at the kiosk) and 9.5 m (at Headquarters).[1][2]

    The ships served in the Atlantic until the early 1930s and were transferred to Indochina.[3] They were stricken in May 1936.[1][4]

    ReferencesEdit

    1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 1.9 Couhat, p. 158
    2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Conway, p. 212.
    3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 Fontenoy, p. 89
    4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 Conway, p. 211
    5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 Fontenoy, p. 88
    6. Gozdawa-Gołębiowski, p. 536
    7. Jane, p. 198

    CitationsEdit

    • Jean Labayle Couhat (1974). French warships of World War I. London. 
    • Robert Gardiner; Randal Gray (1985). Conway's All the World's Fighting Ships, 1906-1921. London: Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 978-0-85177-245-5. 
    • Paul E. Fontenoy (2007). Submarines: An Illustrated History of Their Impact. ABC-CLIO Publishing. 
    • John Moore (1990). Jane's Fighting Ships of World War I. London. 
    • Perepeczko, Andrzej (2014). Od Napoleona do de Gaulle’a. Flota francuska w latach 1789–1942. Oświęcim. ISBN 978-83-7889-372-1. 
    • Lipiński, Jerzy (1999). Druga wojna światowa na morzu. Warsaw. ISBN 83-902554-7-2. 
    • J. Gozdawa-Gołębiowski; T. Wywerka Prekurat (1994). Pierwsza wojna światowa na morzu. Warszawa. 



    This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia (view authors).
    Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.