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Arms of Granville: Gules, three clarions or

John Granville, 1st Earl of Bath PC (29 August 1628 – 22 August 1701) was an English royalist statesman, whose highest position was Lord Lieutenant of Ireland.[1][2][3] He was a son of Sir Bevil Grenville and his wife Grace Smythe.[1] His mother was a daughter of Sir George Smythe.

Career[edit | edit source]

Granville fought in the English Civil War, on the side of Charles I and in the regiment of his father.[1] He was created a knight due to his bravery, and became a Lord of the Bedchamber to the Prince of Wales.[1]

He accompanied Charles II to exile, and mediated with the Long Parliament. In 1660, Granville was instrumental in the negotiations between his cousin Monck, and Charles II that led to the restoration of the King. Shortly after the Restoration, he contested the succession of the Dukedom of Albemarle, but lost. He was presently created Earl of Bath, Viscount Granville, and Baron Granville, and invested a Privy Councillor two years later (in 1663). In 1665, he served as the titular Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, although he never went to Ireland (and is consequently not considered a true holder of that office). In about 1680 he rebuilt Stowe House in a grand style befitting his new noble status.

Lord Bath was twice appointed colonel of the 10th Regiment of Foot, first in 1685 then again in 1688 (around the time of the Glorious Revolution). He died in London, England upon the turn of the 18th century.

Marriage and children[edit | edit source]

In October 1652 Bath married Jane Wyche, daughter of Sir Peter Wyche, English ambassador to the Ottoman Empire, in Stowe, Cornwall, near Kilkhampton.[1] They were parents of five children:

Armorials[edit | edit source]

The armorials of the family of Granville / Grenville of Glamorgan, Devon and Cornwall is of certain form but uncertain blazon. The charges appear in the form of musical pipes of a wind-instrument, similar to pan-pipes. Authoritative sources on heraldry suggest the charges to be variously "clarions" (used by Guillim (d.1621)), the most usual blazon, which are however generally defined as a form of trumpet; "rests" is another common blazon, denoting lance-rests supposedly used by a mounted knight; "organ-rests" is also met with, a seemingly meaningless term (Gibbon (1682)). Other terms are "clavicymbal", "clarichord" and "sufflue" (used by Leigh in his Armory of 1562 and by Boswell, 1572),[4] the latter being a device for blowing (French: souffler) air into an organ.,[5] Guillim suggested the charge may be a rudder,[5] but in which case it is shown upside down, when compared to that charge used for example on the tomb at Callington of Robert Willoughby, 1st Baron Willoughby de Broke. Certainly in the brasses on the chest tomb of Sir John Bassett (d.1529) in Atherington Church, Devon, the charges are engraved in tubular forms with vents or reeds as used in true organ pipes.

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4  "Grenville, John". Dictionary of National Biography. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900. 
  2. Record for ‘‘John Granville, 1st Earl of Bath‘‘ on ‘‘thepeerage.com‘‘
  3. G. E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors. The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume II, page 20-22.
  4. Boswell, Armorie of 1572, vol. 2, p. 124
  5. 5.0 5.1 http://www.heraldica.org/topics/clarion.htm
Military offices
Preceded by
Sir William Morice
Governor of Plymouth
1661–1696
Succeeded by
Charles Trelawny
Preceded by
The Lord Arundell of Trerice
Governor of Pendennis Castle
1680–1696
Succeeded by
Sir Bevil Granville
New regiment Colonel of The Earl of Bath's Regiment
1685–1688
Succeeded by
Sir Charles Carney
Preceded by
Sir Charles Carney
Colonel of The Earl of Bath's Regiment
1688–1693
Succeeded by
Sir Bevil Granville
Court offices
English Interregnum Lord Warden of the Stannaries
1660–1701
Succeeded by
The 2nd Earl of Radnor
Honorary titles
English Interregnum Lord Lieutenant of Cornwall
1660–1696
With: Viscount Granville 1691–1693
Succeeded by
The 2nd Earl of Radnor
Preceded by
The 1st Earl of Radnor
Custos Rotulorum of Cornwall
1685–1696
Preceded by
The 1st Duke of Albemarle
Lord Lieutenant and Custos Rotulorum of Devon
1670–1675
Succeeded by
The 2nd Duke of Albemarle
Preceded by
The 2nd Duke of Albemarle
Lord Lieutenant of Devon
1685–1696
With: Viscount Granville 1691–1693
Succeeded by
The Earl of Stamford
Custos Rotulorum of Devon
1689–1696
Peerage of England
New creation Earl of Bath
1660–1701
Succeeded by
Charles Granville
Baron Granville
(descended by acceleration)

1660–1689

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