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John Weld Peck II
File:John Weld Peck II.jpg
Born (1913-06-23)June 23, 1913
Cincinnati, Ohio
Died September 7, 1993(1993-09-07) (aged 80)
Cincinnati, Ohio
Place of burial Oak Hill Cemetery, Cincinnati
Alma mater Miami University
University of Cincinnati College of Law
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s) Barbara Moser
Janet Peck
Children three

John Weld Peck II (June 23, 1913 – September 7, 1993) was a United States federal judge.

Early life and education[]

Peck was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, the son of Arthur M. and Marguerite (Comstock) Peck. His grandfather Hiram D. Peck, was a judge of the old Superior Court of Cincinnati and a member of the Ohio Constitution Convention of 1912, which drafted the Ohio Constitution. Peck's uncle and namesake, John Weld Peck, was a Cincinnati city councilman and a judge of the United States District Court for the Southern District of Ohio.

Peck graduated from Wyoming High School in Wyoming, Ohio. He received his Bachelor of Arts from Miami University in 1935 and his J.D. from University of Cincinnati College of Law in 1938.

Career[]

After graduating from law school in 1938, Peck was admitted to the bar in Ohio and entered private practice in Cincinnati with the firm of Peck, Shaffer and Williams from 1938 to 1942.

Peck was married on March 25, 1942 to Barbara Moeser. One month later, he was drafted into the United States Army, serving four years on active duty in the European Theater. Toward the end of World War II, he was sent to France as a captain in the Judge Advocate General's Corps.

After returning from the war in 1946, Peck returned to private practice at his law firm in Cincinnati. In 1949 Peck became executive secretary to the Ohio Governor Frank J. Lausche. In 1950, he was appointed a judge of the Hamilton County Court of Common Pleas; at the time, he was 36, the youngest judge to hold that office. Peck was a lecturer at the University of Cincinnati College of Law from 1948 to 1969.[1] Peck served as Ohio Tax Commissioner in Columbus from 1951 to 1953 before returning to the Hamilton County Court of Common Pleas bench, on which he served from 1953 to 1954. Peck resumed private practice in Cincinnati from 1954 to 1959 before Governor Michael DiSalle appointed him a justice of the Supreme Court of Ohio in 1959. He served on the court until 1960, when he again resumed private practice in Cincinnati.

President John F. Kennedy appointed Peck to the United States District Court for the Southern District of Ohio via recess appointment on the October 5, 1961, to a new seat created by 75 United States Statutes at Large 80. Nominated on January 15, 1962, he was confirmed by the Senate on April 11, 1962, and received commission the next day.

President Lyndon B. Johnson nominated Peck to the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit on June 13, 1966, to one of the two new seats created by 80 United States Statutes at Large 75. Confirmed by the Senate on July 22, 1966, he received commission the same day. He took the oath of office on August 4, 1966. He assumed senior status on July 1, 1978. Peck remained on the court until his death on September 7, 1993 in Cincinnati.

In 1984, the federal office building in Cincinnati was named for Peck. At that time, Peck was one of only two living Americans to have a federal building named after him.[1][2]

He died at his desk in the federal building bearing his name.[1] His second wife, Janet Peck, and his three sons by his first wife survived him.[1] He was interred at Oak Hill Cemetery.[1]

References[]

External links[]

  • John Weld Peck II at the Biographical Directory of Federal Judges, a public domain publication of the Federal Judicial Center.
  • Biography from the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit
Legal offices
Preceded by
new seat
Judge of the United States District Court for the Southern District of Ohio
1961–1966
Succeeded by
Timothy Sylvester Hogan
Preceded by
new seat
Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit
1966–1978
Succeeded by
Nathaniel R. Jones

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