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July 2013 Latakia airstrike
Part of Israel–Iran proxy conflict and Syrian civil war
Operational scope Strategic
Objective Destroy a weapons cache containing anti-ship missiles
Date July 5, 2013 (2013-07-05)
Executed by
Outcome Unknown

The July 2013 Latakia explosion was an attack near Latakia on July 2013. The attack was allegedly made by the Israeli Defense Forces against targets believed to contain advanced anti-ship Yakhont cruise missiles supplied to the Syrian government of Bashar Al-Assad by Russia,[1] or a result of mortar fire exchanges in the area.[2]

Background[]

The Yakhont is of concern to Israel and its allies as it expands Syria’s ability to strike Israel’s naval forces or could be provided to Hezbollah, which currently fights on the side of the Syrian government in the Syrian civil war. The missile can also strike ships that could be used to transport supplies to the Syrian opposition, enforce a shipping embargo or support a no-flight zone.[3]

Reports[]

CNN reported that the strike was carried out by the Israeli Air Force, while the Sunday Times reported that the explosions were the result of a cruise missile fired from a Dolphin-class submarine.[4] The blasts happened at a military complex in the town of Samiyah, near Latakia.[5] The FSA speculated that "enemy aircraft" were responsible while Hezbollah's Al-Manar claimed that the explosions were caused by "stray mortars" from "local clashes."[6]

On 13 July, United States officials said that Israel carried out an air attack that targeted advanced anti-ship cruise missiles sold to the Syrian government by Russia. Their conclusion was based on intelligence reports.[7]

Subsequent raids[]

Israel is believed to have carried out another raid on October 30, 2013. The attack happened at an air defense site in Snawbar, 10 miles south of Latakia. An explosion, reportedly caused by a missile fired from over the sea, was reported by residents on social media; later, American officials confirmed Israel was behind the strike.[8]

See also[]

References[]

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