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Karl-Adolf Hollidt
Born 25 April 1891
Died 22 May 1985 (1985-05-23) (aged 94)
Place of birth Speyer
Place of death Siegen
Allegiance
Service/branch Heer
Years of service 1909–1945
Rank Generaloberst
Commands held 6. Armee
Battles/wars
Awards Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves

Karl-Adolf Hollidt (Speyer, 28 April 1891 – Siegen, 22 May 1985) was a German army general and commander during the Second World War.

Early lifeEdit

His father was a local secondary school teacher and he was educated in his hometown of Speyer. After finishing school in 1909, he enlisted into an infantry regiment (No.117) in whose third company he was appointed Second Lieutenant in 1910.[1]

World War IEdit

During the First World War, Hollidt served on the Western Front. Over the course of the war he received a total of two promotions: to First Lieutenant in 1915 and in 1918 to the rank of Captain.[2] He was awarded the Iron Cross 2nd Class on September 9, 1914 and the Iron Cross 1st Class on October 18, 1916.[3]

Time after World War IEdit

After several promotions, to the rank of Major on February 1, 1930, and to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel on February 1, 1933, he served as a battalion commander in Infantry Regiment No. 12 in Dessau. Hollidt next served as a Colonel (in the General Staff) in 1935 and as a Chief-of-Staff of the 1st Army Corps in Königsberg. After his appointment as Major-General on April 1, 1938, Hollidt was active as an infantry commander in Siegen. He also commanded Infantry Regiments No. 57, 116 and 136.

World War IIEdit

At the beginning of World War II, Hollidt served as commander of the 52nd Infantry Division. From November 1, 1939, he served as a Chief-of-Staff with Commander-in-Chief Ost, General Blaskowitz. Lieutenant General Hollidt (promoted April 1, 1940) served from October, 1940 as the commander of the 50th Infantry Division in Greece. Promoted to the rank of General der Infanterie (Infantry General), Hollidt commanded XVII Army Corps, which was planned to take part in the relief operation concerning the 6th Army, then encircled in the Russian city of Stalingrad. After the surrender of the 6th Army, it was reconstituted in March 1943 and Hollidt was given its command. He was promoted to Colonel General on 1 September 1943.

In 1944, his 6th Army suffered severe losses during its retreat from its area of operations north of the Dnieper. Hollidt was subsequently dismissed from his command and put into reserve.[3]

Post-WarEdit

In 1945, Hollidt was captured by US forces. After a trial held at Nuremberg, he was convicted of the unlawful use of prisoners of war and of the deportation and enslavement of civilians. He was sentenced to 5 years imprisonment, of which he served a little less than 14 months (from October 27, 1948 until his release on December 22, 1949). He died in 1985 in Siegen and was interred in his birthplace of Speyer.[3]

Awards and decorationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Citations
Bibliography
  • Fellgiebel, Walther-Peer (2000) (in German). Die Träger des Ritterkreuzes des Eisernen Kreuzes 1939–1945 – Die Inhaber der höchsten Auszeichnung des Zweiten Weltkrieges aller Wehrmachtsteile [The Bearers of the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross 1939–1945 — The Owners of the Highest Award of the Second World War of all Wehrmacht Branches]. Friedberg, Germany: Podzun-Pallas. ISBN 978-3-7909-0284-6. 
  • Scherzer, Veit (2007) (in German). Die Ritterkreuzträger 1939–1945 Die Inhaber des Ritterkreuzes des Eisernen Kreuzes 1939 von Heer, Luftwaffe, Kriegsmarine, Waffen-SS, Volkssturm sowie mit Deutschland verbündeter Streitkräfte nach den Unterlagen des Bundesarchives [The Knight's Cross Bearers 1939–1945 The Holders of the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross 1939 by Army, Air Force, Navy, Waffen-SS, Volkssturm and Allied Forces with Germany According to the Documents of the Federal Archives]. Jena, Germany: Scherzers Miltaer-Verlag. ISBN 978-3-938845-17-2. 
  • Thomas, Franz (1997) (in German). Die Eichenlaubträger 1939–1945 Band 1: A–K [The Oak Leaves Bearers 1939–1945 Volume 1: A–K]. Osnabrück, Germany: Biblio-Verlag. ISBN 978-3-7648-2299-6. 
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