278,252 Pages

Arlington National Cemetery is a United States military cemetery located in Arlington County, Virginia near The Pentagon and directly across the Potomac River from the Lincoln Memorial. The cemetery has graves for thousands of casualties and deceased veterans of the nation's conflicts, beginning with the American Civil War but includes reinterred dead from earlier wars as well. It was established during the Civil War on the grounds of Arlington House, which had been the estate of the family of Confederate general Robert E. Lee's wife Mary Anna (Custis) Lee (a great-granddaughter of Martha Washington).

The Medal of Honor was created during the American Civil War and is the highest military decoration presented by the United States government to a member of its armed forces. The recipient must have distinguished themselves at the risk of their own life above and beyond the call of duty in action against an enemy of the United States. Due to the nature of this medal, it is commonly presented posthumously.[1]

Recipients[edit | edit source]

Image Name Service Rank Death date Burial location Comments
WilliamBarberUSMC.jpg Barber, William E.William E. Barber Marine Corps O-03Captain Risked his life as a commanding officer in action against enemy aggressor forces
Lloyd Burke.jpg Burke, Lloyd L.Lloyd L. Burke Army O-02First Lieutenant Risked his life to attack the enemy in order to rescue his company who had been pinned down
Cornelius Charlton.jpg Charlton, Cornelius H.Cornelius H. Charlton Army E-05Sergeant Killed due to multiple wounds sustained after several attacks against the enemy
Francis C Hammond.jpg Hammond, Francis C.Francis C. Hammond Navy Hospitalman Medical corpsman; sacrificed his life treating and directing wounded Marines until struck by a round of enemy mortar fire.
Harvey, RaymondRaymond Harvey Army O-03Captain Severely wounded after attacking the enemy multiple times and inflicting multiple enemy casualties
James E Johnson.jpg Johnson, James E.James E. Johnson Marine Corps E-05Sergeant Although seriously wounded, was last seen fighting the enemy hand to hand
John K Koelsch.jpg Koelsch, John K.John K. Koelsch Navy O-02Lieutenant, Junior Grade Died as a POW after rescuing several crewman from a downed helicopter and evading the enemy for nine days.
George D. Libby.JPG Libby, George D.George D. Libby Army E-05Sergeant Sacrificed his life to shield the driver of a rescue vehicle from enemy rounds
Mausert FW.jpg Mausert, III, Frederick W.Frederick W. Mausert, III Marine Corps E-05Sergeant Although severely wounded singlehandedly defeated an enemy gun emlacement and drew enemy fire away from his men.
Monagan WC.jpg Monegan, Jr., Walter C.Walter C. Monegan, Jr. Marine Corps E-02Private First Class Killed while repeatedly attacking the enemy at night
Myers RR.jpg Myers, Reginald R.Reginald R. Myers Marine Corps O-04Major Although losing 170 of his men during 14 hours of combat in subzero temperatures, continued to reorganize his unit and spearhead the attack which resulted in 600 enemy killed and 500 wounded
John U D Page.jpg Page, John U. D.John U. D. Page Army O-05Lieutenant Colonel Repeatedly attacked the enemy and defended his convoy until killed
Porter, Donn F.Donn F. Porter Army E-05Sergeant Killed after fighting back a superior enemy force
Robert D. Reem.jpg Reem, Robert D.Robert D. Reem Marine Corps O-01Second Lieutenant Killed after he covered a grenade with his body
CarlSitter USMC.jpg Sitter, Carl L.Carl L. Sitter Marine Corps O-03Captain Although painfully wounded he refused to be evacuated and continued to fight until defense of the area was assured
Skinner SE.jpg Skinner, Jr., Sherrod E.Sherrod E. Skinner, Jr. Marine Corps O-01Second Lieutenant In addition to fighting off an enemy force for three hours he sacrificed his life by smothering a grenade with his body
Miguel-vera-united-states-army-medal-of-honor.jpg Vera, MiguelMiguel Vera Army E-01Private Selflessly chose to remain in position during an enemy attack and cover friendly troops' withdrawal from part of "Old Baldy" hill.
William G Windrich.jpg Windrich, William G.William G. Windrich Marine Corps E-06Staff sergeant Sacrificed his life to direct his men and rescue several wounded Marines from a hillside

Notes[edit | edit source]


References[edit | edit source]

  1. "A Brief History—The Medal of Honor". Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ). Department of Defense. August 8, 2006. http://www.defenselink.mil/faq/pis/med_of_honor.html. Retrieved December 27, 2010. 

Bibliography[edit | edit source]

Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.