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Larry Ross
Born (1922-04-12)April 12, 1922
Duluth, Minnesota, USA
Died May 1, 1995(1995-05-01) (aged 73)

Lawrence "Larry" Ross was an American ice hockey goaltender and coach who played for Minnesota in the early 1950s and is a member of the United States Hockey Hall of Fame.[1]

Career[]

Ross graduated from Morgan Park High School in 1940 and joined the Navy. He played for the naval ice hockey team during World War II.[2] After the war, Ross returned to Minnesota and continued to play in amateur hockey leagues for several years before matriculating to the University of Minnesota.

Ross was a two-year starter for Minnesota, playing in 32 games from 1950 to 1952 and was an AHCA First Team All-American in 1950–51.[3] After graduating, Ross became the head coach at International Falls High School in 1954 and remained with the team for 31 years. In that time Ross led the team to 13 state tournaments, winning 6 Minnesota State Championships. During his tenure the team compiled a 566–169–21 record (.763) and went undefeated for three consecutive seasons from 1964 through 1966. Ross coached 12 players who reached the NHL and 8 olympians. Towards the end of his coaching career, Ross became a scout for the Hartford Whalers and wrote a book titled "Hockey for Everyone".

He was named as the Coach of the Year in 1983 by the Minnesota Hockey Coaches Association and, in his final season with International Falls, he received the National High School Special Sports award. He was inducted into the United States Hockey Hall of Fame in 1988 and received the John Mariucci College Award the same year. Upon his retirement in 1985, his Minnesota classmate Bob Johnson summed up his career: "He made a 100% commitment to his job and the sport of hockey."[2]

Statistics[]

Regular season and playoffs[]

Regular season Playoffs
Season Team League GP W L T MIN GA SO GAA SV% GP W L MIN GA SO GAA SV%
1950–51 Minnesota NCAA 19 78 0 4.10
1951–52 Minnesota NCAA 13 64 0 4.90 .840
NCAA totals 32 142 0

Awards and honors[]

Award Year
AHCA First Team All-American 1950–51 [3]
US Hockey Hall of Fame 1988
Minnesota Athletic Hall of Fame 2013

References[]

External links[]

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