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The Medal of Honor was created during the American Civil War and is the highest military decoration presented by the United States government to a member of its armed forces. The recipient must have distinguished themselves at the risk of their own life above and beyond the call of duty in action against an enemy of the United States. Due to the nature of this medal, it is commonly presented posthumously.[1]

Sixty-one men of Hispanic heritage have been awarded the Medal of Honor. Of the sixty-one Medals of Honor presented to Hispanics, two were presented to members of the United States Navy, thirteen to members of the United States Marine Corps and forty-six to members of the United States Army. Forty-two Medals of Honor were presented posthumously.[2]

The first recipient was Corporal Joseph H. De Castro of the Union Army for his actions at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania on July 3, 1863, during the American Civil War and the most recent recipient is Sergeant First Class Leroy Petry for his actions in Afghanistan. Corporal De Castro was a member of the Massachusetts Infantry, a militia that was not part of the "regular" army; however, Private David Bennes Barkley was a member of the regular army during World War I and has been recognized as the Army's first Hispanic Medal of Honor recipient.[3] In 1864, Seaman John Ortega became the first Hispanic member of the U.S. Navy to receive the Medal of Honor and in 1900, Private France Silva became the first person of Hispanic descent in the U.S. Marine Corps to receive the medal.[4]

Fifteen recipients were born outside the United States mainland, one each in Chile and Spain, five in Mexico and eight in Puerto Rico. Seaman Philip Bazaar from Chile received the medal in January 1865 and Seaman John Ortega from Spain in December 1865. The first native Mexican recipient was Staff Sergeant Marcario Garcia and the first Puerto Rican was PFC Fernando Luis Garcia.[5] 1st Lt. Rudolph B. Davila, of Hispanic-Filipino descent, was the only person of Filipino ancestry to receive the medal for his actions in the war in Europe during World War II.[6] Private Joe P. Martinez was the first Hispanic-American recipient to be awarded the Medal of Honor posthumously for combat heroism on American soil during the same conflict.[7] 1st Lt. Baldomero Lopez, is the only Hispanic graduate of the United States Naval Academy recipient of the Medal of Honor.[8] Captain Humbert Roque Versace was the first recipient of the Medal of Honor to be given to an Army POW for his actions during captivity in Southeast Asia during the Vietnam War.[9]

TerminologyEdit

Hispanic is an ethnic term employed to categorize any citizen or resident of the United States, of any racial background, of any country, and of any religion, who has at least one ancestor from the people of Spain or is of non-Hispanic origin, but has an ancestor from Mexico, Puerto Rico, Cuba, Central or South America, or other Hispanic origin. The three largest Hispanic groups in the United States are the Mexican-Americans, Puerto Ricans and Cubans.[10]

American Civil WarEdit

Three Hispanic Americans earned the Medal of Honor during the American Civil War, two were sailors of the Union Navy and one was a soldier of the 19th Massachusetts Infantry.

      This with the * indicates that the Medal of Honor was awarded posthumously

Image Name Rank Branch Place of action Date of action Notes Refs
Bazaar, PhilipPhilip Bazaar Ordinary Seaman Navy Assault on Fort Fisher January 15, 1865 "As one of a boat crew detailed to one of the generals on shore, O.S. Bazaar bravely entered the fort in the assault and accompanied his party in carrying dispatches at the height of the battle. He was 1 of 6 men who entered the fort in the assault from the fleet" [11]
De Castro, Joseph H.Joseph H. De Castro Corporal Army Gettysburg, Pennsylvania July 3, 1863 Attacked a confederate flag bearer from the 19th Virginia Infantry regiment and captured their flag. [11]
Ortega meda of Honor Ortega, JohnJohn Ortega Seaman Navy USS Saratoga December 1864 Was a member of a landing party who made several raids in August and September 1864 which resulted in the capture of many confederate prisoners and the taking or destruction of substantial quantities of ordnance, ammunition, and supplies. A number of buildings, bridges, and salt works were also destroyed during the expedition [12]

Boxer rebellionEdit

The Boxer Movement, or Boxer Rebellion, was a Chinese uprising from November 1899 to September 7, 1901, against foreign influence in areas such as trade, politics, religion and technology that occurred in China during the final years of the Manchu rule (Qing Dynasty).[13]

The members of the Chinese Righteous Harmony Society|Society of Righteous and Harmonious Fists were simply called boxers by the Westerners due to the martial arts and calisthenics they practiced. It began as an anti-foreign, anti-imperialist, peasant-based movement that attacked foreigners who were building railroads and violating Feng shui. Christians who they felt were responsible for foreign domination of China were also targeted. In June 1900, the Boxers invaded Beijing and killed 230 non-Chinese. Before it ended, tens of thousands of Chinese Christians, Catholic and Protestants were killed, mostly in the Shandong and Shanxi provinces.[13]

The government of Empress Dowager Cixi gave her support to the boxers causing foreign diplomats, civilians, soldiers and even some Chinese Christians to retreat to the legation quarter. They held out against the boxers for 55 days until a multinational coalition rushed 20,000 troops to their rescue. The Chinese government was forced to indemnify the victims and make many additional concessions. Subsequent reforms implemented after the crisis of 1900 laid the foundation for the end of the Qing Dynasty and the establishment of the modern Chinese Republic.[13]

During the Boxer rebellion, 59 American servicemen received the Medal of Honor for their actions.[14] Only one of these, France Silva, who received the Medal of Honor for "distinguishing himself for meritorious conduct" while serving aboard the USS Newark, was a Hispanic American.[15]

Image Name Rank Branch Place of action Date of action Notes[15]
Silva, FranceFrance Silva Private Marine Corps Peking, China June 28, 1900August 17, 1900 For distinguishing himself by meritorlous conduct

World War IEdit

World War I was a global military conflict that embroiled most of the world's great powers, assembled in two opposing alliances: the Entente and the Central Powers.[16] The immediate cause of the war was the June 28, 1914 assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne, by Gavrilo Princip, a Bosnian Serb citizen of Austria–Hungary and member of the Black Hand. The retaliation by Austria–Hungary against Serbia activated a series of alliances that set off a chain reaction of war declarations. Within a month, much of Europe was in a state of open warfare, resulting in the mobilization of more than 65 million European soldiers,[17] and more than 40 million casualties—including approximately 20 million deaths by the end of the war.[18]

When World War I broke out, the United States maintained a policy of isolationism, avoiding conflict while trying to negotiate peace between the warring nations. However, when a German U-boat sank the British liner Lusitania in 1915, with 128 Americans aboard, U.S. President Woodrow Wilson demanded an end to attacks on passenger ships. Germany complied and Wilson unsuccessfully tried to mediate a settlement. He repeatedly warned that the U.S. would not tolerate unrestricted submarine warfare, in violation of international law.[19]

By the end of the war one hundred twenty one men would receive the Medal for their actions in World War I, 35 of them posthumously.[20][21] Of the 121 recipients only one, David B. Barkley was a Hispanic American. He received the medal for volunteering to swim across a river to gather information on an enemy force. When he was swimming back across the river he got cramps and drowned.[22]

      This with the * indicates that the Medal of Honor was awarded posthumously

Image Name Rank Branch Place of action Date of action Notes[22]
A head and shoulders portrait of a young, cleanshaven man in a formal military uniform, wearing a hat. Barkley, David B.David B. Barkley* Private Army Near Pouilly, France November 9, 1918 Volunteered to swim a river to gather information on an enemy force. When he was swimming back across the river he got cramps and drowned.

World War IIEdit

      This with the * indicates that the Medal of Honor was awarded posthumously

Image Name Branch Rank Place of action Date of action Notes Refs
90px Adams, LucianLucian Adams Staff Sergeant Army St. Die, France October 1944 "[P]ersonally killed 9 Germans, eliminated 3 enemy machineguns, vanquished a specialized force which was armed with automatic weapons and grenade launchers, cleared the woods of hostile elements, and reopened the severed supply lines to the assault companies of his battalion." [23]
Pedro Cano portrait Cano, PedroPedro Cano Private Army Schevenhutte, Germany Dec. 3, 1944 During an attack on German forces he risked his life by crawling through a minefield with a rocket launcher and repeatedly attacking a German tank unit [24]
90px Davila, Rudolph B.Rudolph B. Davila Staff Sergeant Army Artena, Italy May 28, 1944 Risked his life to defeat an attacking force of enemy soldiers. [23]
Gandara, JoeJoe Gandara Private Army Amfreville, France June 9, 1944 He destroyed three hostile machine guns before he was fatally wounded. [24]
A head and shoulders portrait of a young, cleanshaven man with dark hair in a tan shirt and tie. Garcia, MarcarioMarcario Garcia Staff Sergeant Army Near Grosshau, Germany November 27, 1944 "While an acting squad leader, he single-handedly assaulted two enemy machine gun emplacements" [25]
A head and shoulders portrait of a young, cleanshaven man in a formal military uniform, wearing a hat. Gonsalves, HaroldHarold Gonsalves* Private First Class Marine Corps Ryūkyū Chain, Okinawa April 15, 1945 Sacrificed his life to smother a grenade with his body [25]
A head and shoulders portrait of a young, clean shaven man with dark hair in a formal military uniform, wearing a hat. Gonzales, David M.David M. Gonzales* Private First Class Army Villa Verde Trail, Luzon, Philippine Islands April 25, 1945 Was killed in action in the Philippines while digging out fellow soldiers who had been buried in a bomb explosion [25]
90px Herrera, Silvestre S.Silvestre S. Herrera Private First Class Army Near Mertzwiller, France March 15, 1945 Injured in action while charging an enemy stronghold resulting in the capture of eight enemy soldiers [25]
Lara, Salvador J.Salvador J. Lara Private First Class Army Aprilia, Italy May 27–28, 1944 For courageous actions during combat operations in Aprilia, Italy before he was fatally wounded. [24]
Jose M. Lopez Lopez, Jose M.Jose M. Lopez Sergeant Army Near Krinkelt, Belgium December 17, 1944 Risked his life to continue firing on an attacking enemy force which prevented them from flanking his unit and allowed his unit to repel the attack. [25]
90px Martinez, Joe P.Joe P. Martinez* Private Army Attu, Aleutians May 26, 1943 Killed in action while participating in the defeat of enemy forces in a snow covered mountain. [26]
A head and shoulders portrait of a young, cleanshaven man with dark hair in a military uniform, wearing a hat. Jr., Manuel PerezManuel Perez Jr.* Private First Class Army Fort William McKinley, Luzon, Philippine Islands February 13, 1945 Killed 18 enemy soldiers and that they were in so his company could advance [26]
A head and shoulders portrait of a young, cleanshaven hispanic man with dark hair in a military uniform, wearing a hat. Mendoza, Manuel V. Manuel V. Mendoza Staff Sergeant Army Battaglia, Italy Oct. 4, 1944 For courageous actions during combat operations on Mount Battaglia, Italy before he was fatally wounded. [24]
A head and shoulders portrait of a young, clean shaven man in a formal military uniform, wearing a hat. He is smiling broadly. Rodriguez, Cleto L.Cleto L. Rodriguez Private Army Paco Railroad Station, Manila, Philippine Islands February 9, 1945 With another soldier, who was killed in the action, killed more than 82 Japanese, completely disorganized their defense, and allowed for the enemy to be defeatede [26]
alt=A head and shoulders portrait of a young, clean shaven man with dark hair in a military uniform, wearing a hat. Ruiz, Alejandro R.Alejandro R. Ruiz Private First Class Army Okinawa April 28, 1945 Risked his life to eliminate an enemy pillbox and kill the 12 enemy soldiers who were occupying it [26]
90px Valdez, Jose F.Jose F. Valdez* Private First Class Army Rosenkrantz, France January 25, 1945 Sacrificed his own life to repulse an attack from a much larger enemy attack allowing his unit to counterattack and drive off the enemy [27]
A head and shoulders portrait of a young, cleanshaven man, wearing a helmet and smiling. Villegas, Ysmael R.Ysmael R. Villegas* Staff Sergeant Army Villa Verde Trail, Luzon, Philippine Islands March 20, 1945 Sacrificed his own life by charging multiple enemy fighting positions and killing the enemy until he was killed [27]

Korean WarEdit

The Korean War was an escalation of border clashes between two rival Korean regimes (each of which was supported by external powers) with each Korean regime trying to topple the other through political and guerilla tactics. In a very narrow sense, some may refer to it as a civil war, though many other factors were at play.[28] After failing to strengthen their cause in the free elections held in South Korea during May 1950[29] and the refusal of South Korea to hold new elections per North Korean demands, the communist North Korean Army moved south on June 25, 1950 to attempt to reunite the Korean peninsula, which had been formally divided since 1948. The conflict was then expanded by the United States and the Soviet Union's involvement as part of the larger Cold War. The main hostilities were during the period from June 25, 1950 until the armistice was signed on July 27, 1953.

During the Korean War 146 United States military personnel received the Medal of Honor for valor in combat. Ninety-eight Medals of Honor were presented posthumously. Of these recipients, 14 were hispanic Americans, nine of which received the medal posthumously.       This with the * indicates that the Medal of Honor was awarded posthumously

Image Name Rank Branch Place of action Date of action Notes[30]
JoeRBaldonado150 Baldonado, Joe R.Joe R. Baldonado Army E-04Corporal Kangdong, Korea November 25, 1950 Sacrificed his life by remaining in an exposed machine gun position during an enemy attack; killed numerous enemy troops.[31]
VictorHEspinoza150 Espinoza, Victor H.Victor H. Espinoza Army E-04Corporal Chorwon, Korea August 1, 1952 Single-handedly silenced a machine gun crew, discovered and destroyed covert enemy tunnel, wiped out two bunkers.[32]
A head and shoulders portrait of a young, cleanshaven man with dark hair. García, Fernando LuisFernando Luis García* Private First Class Marine Corps Korea September 5, 1952 While defending a combat outpost located more than one mile forward of the main line of fighting, he chose to sacrifice himself by smothering an enemy grenade with his body that landed nearby in order to save another Marine.
A head and shoulders portrait of a young, cleanshaven man with dark hair. Gomez, EdwardEdward Gomez* Private First Class Marine Corps Kajon-ni, Korea September 14, 1951 Sacrificed himself to save other Marines by smothering an enemy grenade absorbing the explosion in his own body.
A head and shoulders portrait of a young, cleanshaven man with dark hair, wearing a military uniform and a hat. Guillen, AmbrosioAmbrosio Guillen* Staff Sergeant Marine Corps Songuch-on, Korea July 25, 1953 He maneuvered his platoon over unfamiliar terrain in the face of hostile fire and placed his men in fighting positions. With his unit pinned down when the outpost was attacked under cover of darkness by an estimated force of two enemy battalions supported by mortar and artillery fire, he deliberately exposed himself to the heavy barrage and attacks to direct his men in defending their positions and personally supervise the treatment and evacuation of the wounded. Inspired by his leadership, the platoon quickly rallied and engaged the enemy force in fierce hand-to-hand combat. Although critically wounded he refused medical aid and continued to direct his men throughout the remainder of the engagement until the enemy was defeated and thrown into disorderly retreat. Succumbing to his wounds within a few hours
Rodolfo Hernandez Hernandez, Rodolfo P.Rodolfo P. Hernandez Corporal Army Near Wontong-ni, Korea May 31, 1951 While in a defensive position on Hill 420 his platoon came under attack by a numerically superior and hostile force. They utilized heavy artillery, mortar, and machinegun fire which inflicted numerous casualties on the platoon. When comrades were forced to withdraw due to lack of ammunition and although wounded in an exchange of grenades, Hernandez continued to fire into the onrushing enemy until a ruptured cartridge rendered his rifle inoperative. He then rushed the enemy armed only with rifle and bayonet and engaging them killing 6 before falling unconscious from grenade, bayonet, and bullet wounds. His actions momentarily halted the enemy advance and enabled his unit to counterattack and retake the lost ground.
A head and shoulders portrait of a young, cleanshaven man with dark hair, wearing a formal military uniform. Lopez, BaldomeroBaldomero Lopez* First Lieutenant Marine Corps Inchon Landing, Korea September 15, 1950 Sacrificed his life by smothering a grenade with his body preventing any of the other friendly forces from being killed in the blast.
90px Martinez, BenitoBenito Martinez* Corporal Army Satacri, Korea September 6, 1952 When his position was surrounded by the enemy, he refused rescue due to the risk involved and remained in his position throughout the night fighting off enemy forces until he was killed by the enemy. His continued resistance enabled friendly elements to reorganize, attack, and regain the key terrain.
Juan-negron-united-states-army-medal-of-honor Negrón, JuanJuan Negrón Army E-08Master Sergeant Kalma-Eri, Korea April 28, 1951 Held the most vulnerable position on his company’s position throughout the night, accurately hurling hand grenades at short range when hostile troops approached.[33]
A head and shoulders portrait of a young, cleanshaven man with dark hair, wearing a formal military uniform and a hat. Obregon, Eugene ArnoldEugene Arnold Obregon* Private First Class Marine Corps Second Battle of Seoul September 26, 1950 After a fellow Marine fell wounded he fired his pistol with one hand as he ran, grasping his comrade by the arm with his other hand and, despite the great peril to himself, dragged him to the side of the road. He was bandaging the man's wounds while hostile troops of approximately platoon strength fired at them and began advancing toward his position. Using the wounded Marine's carbine, he risked his life by placing his own body as a shield in front of the wounded Marine and lay there firing accurately and effectively into the hostile group until he himself was fatally wounded by enemy machine-gun fire. His actions enabled his fellow Marines to rescue the wounded man and aided in repelling the attack
MikeCPena243 Pena, Mike C.Mike C. Pena Army E-08Master Sergeant Waegwan, Korea September 4, 1950 Covered his unit's retreat and single-handedly held off large enemy force overnight, until being killed the following morning.[34]
Demensio Rivera Rivera, DemensioDemensio Rivera Army E-02Private First Class Changyongni, Korea May 22, 1951 to May 23, 1951 An automatic rifleman, Rivera tenaciously held a forward position exposed to heavy fire; when his rifle became inoperative, Rivera used his pistol and grenades, and eventually fought hand-to-hand and forced back the enemy.[35]
A head and shoulders portrait of a young, cleanshaven man with dark hair, wearing a formal military uniform. Rodriguez, Joseph C.Joseph C. Rodriguez Private First Class Army Near Munye-ri, Korea May 21, 1951 While participating in an attack against a hostile force occupying well-fortified positions on rugged commanding terrain, he risked his life by dashing 60 yards up hill through intense enemy fire. After lobbing grenades into the first foxhole killing its occupants he silenced an automatic weapon with 2 grenades and continued his assault to the top of the peak, wiping out 2 more foxholes. Next, he then tossed grenades into the remaining emplacement, destroying the gun and annihilating its crew. His actions resulted in 15 enemy dead and the defense of the opposition was broken, the enemy routed, and the strategic strongpoint was secured.
Miguel-vera-united-states-army-medal-of-honor Vera, MiguelMiguel Vera Army E-01Private Chorwon, Korea September 21, 1952 Selflessly chose to remain in position during an enemy attack and cover friendly troops' withdrawal from part of "Old Baldy" hill.[36]

Vietnam WarEdit

The Vietnam War took place from 1955 to 1975. The war was fought between the Communist-supported Democratic Republic of Vietnam and the United States-supported Republic of Vietnam, beginning with the presence of a small number of US military advisors in 1955 and escalating into direct US involvement in a ground war in 1965. It concluded with the Fall of Saigon on 30 April 1975, defeating the United States foreign policy in Vietnam.[37]

During the Vietnam War, 248 Medals of Honor were received, 156 (62.9%) of them posthumously. Soldiers of the Army received the most with 161, followed by 57 to the Marines, 16 to the Navy and the remaining 14 to the Air Force.[38] Of these, 24 recipients were hispanic and of those, 17 were presented posthumously.

      This with the * indicates that the Medal of Honor was awarded posthumously

Image Name Rank Branch Place of action Date of action Notes Refs
LeonardLAlvarado243 Alvarado, Leonard L.Leonard L. Alvarado* Specialist Four Army Phước Long Province August 12, 1969 For disrupting an enemy raid and saving the lives of several comrades [39]
90px Baca, John P.John P. Baca Specialist Four Army Phuoc Long Province February 10, 1970 Risked his own life by smothering a grenade with his body to save several fellow soldiers [40]
Benavidez Benavidez, Roy P.Roy P. Benavidez Master Sergeant Army Loc Ninh, Vietnam May 2, 1968 Risked his own life to rescue a group of fellow soldiers who had been killed or injured by enemy forces. While evacuating wounded and although he was seriously wounded himself he continued to direct fire at enemy forces as the dead and injured were evacuated as well as ensuring all classified documents at the scene were either retrieved or destroyed to prevent them from being found by the enemy. [40]
Felix-conde-falcon-united-states-army-medal-of-honor Conde-Falcon, Felix M.Felix M. Conde-Falcon* Staff Sergeant Army Ap Tan Hoa April 4, 1969 Killed while assaulting heavily fortified enemy bunkers [41]
ArdieRCopas243 Copas, Ardie R.Ardie R. Copas* Specialist Four Army Ph Romeas Hek, Cambodia May 12, 1970 Killed while holding off an enemy ambush while wounded, so his comrades could be evacuated [42]
A head and shoulders portrait of a young, cleanshaven man, wearing a formal military uniform and a hat. De La Garza, Emilio A.Emilio A. De La Garza* Lance Corporal Marine Corps Da Nang April 11, 1970 Sacrificed his life to save the lives of two fellow Marines when an enemy soldier they were attempting to capture pulled the pin on a grenade. [40]
A head and shoulders portrait of a young, cleanshaven man, wearing a formal military uniform and a hat. Dias, Ralph E.Ralph E. Dias* Private First Class Marine Corps Quang Nam Province November 12, 1969 Sacrificed his life by repeatedly attacking a heavily armed enemy position. Was mortally wounded as he destroyed the enemy position. [40]
JesusSDuran243 Duran, Jesus S.Jesus S. Duran* Sergeant Army Ph Romeas Hek, Cambodia April 10, 1969 Saved wounded Americans on a search and clear operation [43]
SantiagoJErevia300 Erevia, Santiago J.Santiago J. Erevia Specialist Four Army near Tam Kỳ May 1969 For his courageous actions while serving as radio telephone operator in Company C, 1st Battalion (Airmobile), 501st Infantry, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile) during search and clear mission. [44]
90px Fernandez, DanielDaniel Fernandez* Specialist Four Army Hau Nghia Province February 18, 1966 [40]
CandelarioGarcia243 Garcia, CandelarioCandelario Garcia* Sergeant Army Lai Khe December 8, 1968 Destroyed two enemy machine gun nests while saving wounded comrades [45]
90px Gonzalez, Alfredo CantuAlfredo Cantu Gonzalez* Sergeant Marine Corps Hue City February 4, 1968 [40]
A head and shoulders portrait of a young, cleanshaven man, wearing a formal military uniform and a hat. Jimenez, Jose FranciscoJose Francisco Jimenez* Lance Corporal Marine Corps Quang Nam Province August 28, 1969 [40]
alt=A head and shoulders portrait of a young, cleanshaven man with dark hair, wearing a formal military uniform and a hat. Keith, MiguelMiguel Keith* Lance Corporal Marine Corps Quang Ngai Province May 8, 1970 [40]
90px Lozada, CarlosCarlos Lozada* Private First Class Army Dak To November 20, 1967 [40]
A head and upper body portrait of a middle-aged, cleanshaven man with dark hair, wearing a formal military uniform with many medals on the front. A five-pointed gold star hangs from a blue ribbon around his neck. Rascon, Alfred V.Alfred V. Rascon Specialist Four Army Republic of Vietnam March 16, 1966 [46]
A head and shoulders portrait of a cleanshaven man with dark hair, wearing a military uniform. Rocco, Louis R.Louis R. Rocco Sergeant First Class Army Northeast of Katum, Republic of Vietnam May 24, 1970 [46]
JoseRodela300 Rodela, JoseJose Rodela Master Sergeant Army Phuoc Long Province September 1, 1969 Repeatedly exposed himself to enemy fire to attend to the fallen and eliminate an enemy rocket position. [47]
90px Rubio, EuripidesEuripides Rubio* Captain Army Tay Ninh Province November 8, 1966 [46]
A head and torso portrait of a man wearing a helmet and military uniform. Santiago-Colon, HectorHector Santiago-Colon* Specialist Four Army Quang Tri Province June 28, 1968 Sacrificed his own life by smothering a grenade with his body [46]
A head and shoulders portrait of a young, clean shaven man with dark hair, wearing a formal military uniform. Smith, Elmelindo RodriguesElmelindo Rodrigues Smith* Sergeant First Class Army Republic of Vietnam February 16, 1967 Sacrificed his life to keep firing on an enemy force so his unit, that had been pinned down, could [46]
A head and shoulders portrait of a young, clean shaven man, wearing a formal military uniform and a hat. Vargas, Jay R.Jay R. Vargas Captain Marine Corps Dai Do April 30, 1968May 2, 1968 Although seriously wounded himself he led his Marines in combat against a larger enemy force for three days. [46]
A head and shoulders portrait of a young, clean shaven man with dark hair, wearing a military uniform. He is smiling broadly. Versace, Humbert RoqueHumbert Roque Versace* Captain Army An Xuyen Province October 29, 1963September 26, 1965 Maintained a high level of discipline and leadership while a Viet Cong POW before being executed. [46]
Yabes, MaximoMaximo Yabes* First Sergeant Army Near Phu Hoa Dong February 26, 1967 After smothering an enemy grenade with his own body he continued to repel an enemy attack until he was killed [46]

War in AfghanistanEdit

Only one Hispanic American has received the Medal of Honor for their actions in the War in Afghanistan. Leroy Petry was serving in the vicinity of Paktya Province, Afghanistan May 26, 2008 with the 75th Ranger Regiment when the events for his medal occurred. He and other rangers were clearing a house of a high valued target when they were attacked by small arms fire and wounded. While getting themselves to cover and radioing for assistance an enemy fighter threw a grenade and it landed nearby. Petry immediately grabbed the grenade and attempted to throw it but it exploded amputating his hand and injuring him with shrapnel.[48][49][50][51]

Image Name Rank Branch Place of action Date of action Notes
Leroy A Petry Petry, LeroyLeroy Petry Sergeant First Class Army Afghanistan May 26, 2008 An enemy threw a grenade at their position which landed 10 meters from them; it detonated, knocked them to the ground, wounded Higgins, and Robinson was further wounded. Shortly thereafter the three were joined by SSG James Roberts and SPC Christopher Gathercole. Another grenade was thrown by an enemy which landed a few feet from Higgins and Robinson. Petry, knowing the risk to his life, moved toward the grenade, picked it up, and attempted to throw it in the direction of the enemy.[48][49]

By military branchEdit

Awards by branch of service
Military
branch
PosthumouslyIn person Number of
awards
Army301646
Marines11213
Navy022
Total412061

Note: The information in "Awards by branch of service Table" is based on the sourced information on the "List of Recipients Table".

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the United States Army Center of Military History.
  1. "A Brief History — The Medal of Honor". Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ). Department of Defense. August 8, 2006. http://www.defenselink.mil/faq/pis/med_of_honor.html. Retrieved February 9, 2010. 
  2. "Hispanic American Medal of Honor recipients". United States Army Center of Military History. http://www.history.army.mil/html/topics/hispam/hisp-moh.html. Retrieved January 24, 2010. 
  3. Medal of Honor recipient of Hispanic Heritage, Hispanic America USA, Retrieved July 29, 2008
  4. Local hero no longer forgotten, Retrieved July 29, 2008 Archived March 18, 2008 at the Wayback Machine
  5. Puerto Rican Medal of Honor recipients, Oakland Tribune, Retrieved July 29, 2008
  6. "Hispanic of Filipino ancestry to receive the medal". Somos Primos. Somos Primos. http://www.somosprimos.com/sp2007/spmar07/spmar07.htm. Retrieved March 2007. 
  7. 22 Asian Americans Inducted into Hall of Heroes, El Boricua, Retrieved July 29, 2008
  8. 1st Lieutenant Baldomero Lopez, USMC, Association of Naval Services Officers, Retrieved July 29, 2008
  9. Mishalov, Neil; Versace MoH Citation excerpts from:The Washington Post, July 8, 2002; By Steve Vogel, The Washington Times; July 4, 2002; By Ellen Sorokin; The Washington Post; May 27, 2001; Stars and Stripes; January 18, 2001; By Dave Eberhart, Stars and Stripes Veterans Affairs Editor, Stars and Stripes; July 18, 2000; By Dave Eberhart, Stars and Stripes Veterans Affairs Editor and Stars and Stripes; Oct 7, 2000; By Mike Faber, Stars and Stripes Contributing Writer, Retrieved July 29, 2008
  10. Hispanic Population of the United States: Current Population - Survey Definition and Background, United States Census Bureau, November 2, 2000, Retrieved December 28, 2007
  11. 11.0 11.1 "Medal of Honor recipients - Civil War A-L". United States Army Center of Military History. August 6, 2009. http://www.history.army.mil/html/moh/civwaral.html. Retrieved January 16, 2010. 
  12. "Medal of Honor recipients - Civil War M-Z". United States Army Center of Military History. August 3, 2009. http://www.history.army.mil/html/moh/civwarmz.html. Retrieved January 16, 2010. 
  13. 13.0 13.1 13.2 Esherick, Joseph W. (1987). The Origins of the Boxer Uprising. University of California Press. p. 154. ISBN 0-520-06459-3. http://books.google.com/books?id=jVESdBSMasMC&printsec=frontcover&dq=The+Origins+of+the+Boxer+Uprising&cd=1#v=onepage&q=Medal%20of%20Honor&f=false. Retrieved February 6, 2010. 
  14. "Medal of Honor recipients". Medal of Honor statistics. United States Army Center of Military History. September 29, 2009. http://www.history.army.mil/html/moh/mohstats.html. Retrieved June 29, 2009. 
  15. 15.0 15.1 "Medal of Honor recipients - China Relief Expedition (Boxer Rebellion)". United States Army Center of Military History. August 3, 2009. http://www.history.army.mil/html/moh/chinare.html. Retrieved January 16, 2010. 
  16. Willmott 2003, p. 10
  17. Willmott 2003, p. 307
  18. Spencer Tucker, Laura Matysek Wood, Justin D. Murphy (1999). The European powers in the First World War: an encyclopedia. Taylor & Francis. p. 172. ISBN 978-0-8153-3351-7. http://books.google.com/?id=gv3GEyB19wIC&pg=PA172&dq=European+casualties+of+World+War+I#v=onepage&q=. Retrieved August 21, 2009. 
  19. Brands 1997, p. 756
  20. Owens 2004, pp. 95–98
  21. "Medal of Honor statistics". United States Army Center of Military History. June 8, 2009. http://www.history.army.mil/html/moh/mohstats.html. Retrieved June 29, 2009. 
  22. 22.0 22.1 "Medal of Honor recipients - World War I". United States Army Center of Military History. August 3, 2009. http://www.history.army.mil/html/moh/worldwari.html. Retrieved January 16, 2010. 
  23. 23.0 23.1 "Medal of Honor recipients - World War II (A–F)". United States Army Center of Military History. August 3, 2009. http://www.history.army.mil/html/moh/wwII-a-f.html. Retrieved January 16, 2010. 
  24. 24.0 24.1 24.2 24.3 to award Medal of Honor to 24 Army veterans
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  27. 27.0 27.1 "Medal of Honor recipients - World War II (T–Z)". United States Army Center of Military History. August 3, 2009. http://www.history.army.mil/html/moh/wwII-t-z.html. Retrieved January 16, 2010. 
  28. Richard W. Stewart, ed. "Ch. 8 :The Korean War, 1950–1953". American Military History, Volume 2(revised 2005). CMH Pub 30-22. http://www.history.army.mil/books/AMH-V2/AMH%20V2/chapter8.htm. Retrieved August 20, 2007. 
  29. Hermes, Jr., Walter (1966). Truce Tent and Fighting Front. United States Army Center of Military History. http://www.history.army.mil/books/korea/truce/fm.htm. 
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  31. "Valor 24: Medal of Honor". Corporal Joe R. Baldonado. United States Army. http://www.army.mil/medalofhonor/valor24/recipients/baldonado/?f=recipients&l=name. Retrieved March 22, 2015. 
  32. "Valor 24: Medal of Honor". Sergeant Victor H. Espinoza. United States Army. http://www.army.mil/medalofhonor/valor24/recipients/espinoza/?f=recipients&l=name. Retrieved March 22, 2015. 
  33. "Valor 24: Medal of Honor". Master Sergeant Juan E. Negron. United States Army. http://www.army.mil/medalofhonor/valor24/recipients/negron/?f=recipients&l=name. Retrieved March 22, 2015. 
  34. "Valor 24: Medal of Honor". Master Sergeant Mike C. Pena. United States Army. http://www.army.mil/medalofhonor/valor24/recipients/pena/?f=recipients&l=name. Retrieved March 22, 2015. 
  35. "Valor 24: Medal of Honor". Private First Class Demensio Rivera. United States Army. http://www.army.mil/medalofhonor/valor24/recipients/rivera/?f=recipients&l=name. Retrieved March 22, 2015. 
  36. "Valor 24: Medal of Honor". Private Miguel A. Vera. United States Army. http://www.army.mil/medalofhonor/valor24/recipients/vera/?f=recipients&l=name. Retrieved March 22, 2015. 
  37. "Vietnam War". Encyclopædia Britannica. Archived from the original on 2010-12-14. http://www.webcitation.org/5uyUCoYke. Retrieved March 5, 2008. "Meanwhile, the United States, its military demoralized and its civilian electorate deeply divided, began a process of coming to terms with defeat in its longest and most controversial war" 
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  39. "Valor 24: Medal of Honor". Specialist 4 Leonard L. Alvarado. United States Army. http://www.army.mil/medalofhonor/valor24/recipients/alvarado/?f=recipients&l=name. Retrieved March 22, 2015. 
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  41. "Valor 24: Medal of Honor". Staff Sergeant Felix M. Conde-Falcon. United States Army. http://www.army.mil/medalofhonor/valor24/recipients/conde-falcon/?f=recipients&l=name. Retrieved March 22, 2015. 
  42. "Valor 24: Medal of Honor". Sergeant Ardie R. Copas. United States Army. http://www.army.mil/medalofhonor/valor24/recipients/copas/?f=recipients&l=name. Retrieved March 22, 2015. 
  43. "Valor 24: Medal of Honor". Sergeant Jesus S. Duran. United States Army. http://www.army.mil/medalofhonor/valor24/recipients/duran/?f=recipients&l=name. Retrieved March 22, 2015. 
  44. "Valor 24: Medal of Honor". Sergeant Santiago J. Erevia. United States Army. http://www.army.mil/medalofhonor/valor24/recipients/erevia/?f=recipients&l=name. Retrieved March 22, 2015. 
  45. "Valor 24: Medal of Honor". Sergeant Candelario Garcia. United States Army. http://www.army.mil/medalofhonor/valor24/recipients/garcia/?f=recipients&l=name. Retrieved March 22, 2015. 
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  47. "Valor 24: Medal of Honor". Master Sergeant Jose Rodela. United States Army. http://www.army.mil/medalofhonor/valor24/recipients/rodela/?f=recipients&l=name. Retrieved March 22, 2015. 
  48. 48.0 48.1 "Wounded Soldier to receive Medal of Honor for action in Afghanistan". Army News Service. United States Army. 1 June 2011. http://www.army.mil/article/58595/Wounded_Soldier_to_receive_Medal_of_Honor_for_action_in_Afghanistan/. Retrieved 1 June 2011. 
  49. 49.0 49.1 Jason Ukman (12 July 2011). "Leroy Petry, Army Ranger, awarded Medal of Honor". http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/checkpoint-washington/post/leroy-petry-army-ranger-awarded-medal-of-honor/2011/07/12/gIQA4XU0AI_blog.html. Retrieved 14 July 2011. 
  50. "Wash. soldier awarded Medal of Honor". 12 July 2011. http://www.kgw.com/news/local/Wash-soldier-awarded-Medal-of-Honor-125450708.html. Retrieved 14 July 2011. 
  51. "Latino Soldier Receives Medal of Honor"; By Damarys Ocana

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