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a colour map of Yugoslavia with detachment areas of responsibility marked in red

A map showing the areas of responsibility of Yugoslav Partisan detachments in October–December 1941

The Yugoslav Partisans formed operational detachments (Serbo-Croatian language: odredi) in Bosnia and Herzegovina after the German-led Axis invasion of Yugoslavia during World War II. These detachments were formed to conduct local operations against the occupying powers and those collaborating with them, and a total of 108 detachments were created in Bosnia and Herzegovina during the war. The detachments were named after a district, town, region or geographic feature, and ranged in size from 16 to 3,000 fighters. Larger detachments were usually divided into several companies or battalions. Some detachments had a very brief existence, whereas others existed for most of the war and a few were disestablished and re-established several times. Information on some small or short-lived detachments is very limited. There were also a significant number of independent battalions outside the detachment framework, but these are not included in the scope of this article.

Background[edit | edit source]

After the German-led Axis invasion of Yugoslavia in April 1941, the Communist Party of Yugoslavia (KPJ) began to organise militarily for resistance if Germany attacked the Soviet Union. This involved the establishment of a central military committee on 10 April, and the creation of a military committee for each of the "provinces" of Yugoslavia in late April. These provinces were based on the historical "national" entities of the country, rather than the pre-war political divisions, or banovina which had artificially divided the "national" entities to reduce the threat of nationalism. Each province already had a Provincial Committee of the KPJ reporting to the Central Committee, so these provincial military committees were created in parallel with the party organisation. One of the "national" entities consisted of Bosnia and Herzegovina, which were now encompassed by the Axis puppet state, the Independent State of Croatia, and included Croatia, as well as Bosnia and Herzegovina. The Provincial Committee for Bosnia-Herzegovina was based in Sarajevo.[1]

In late May and June 1941, members of the Provincial Committee for Bosnia-Herzegovina travelled to the oblast (regional) centres of Banja Luka in the Bosanska Krajina region, Mostar in Herzegovina, and Tuzla in the Birač region of eastern Bosnia to advise the oblast KPJ committees of the decisions of the Central Committee, and to form oblast military committees. This also occurred in Sarajevo, for an oblast military committee responsible for the Romanija region of eastern Bosnia located north of that city. Each oblast military committee formed district military committees, who in turn contacted KPJ members in towns and villages of their district to organise resistance. This pyramid-like structure mirrored the KPJ structure, and following the German invasion of the Soviet Union on 22 June, the Central Committee met on 4 July and decided to initiate an armed uprising against the occupiers. This included the creation of a formal military structure, headed by the General Staff for the People's Liberation Partisan Detachments of Yugoslavia under the leadership of Josip Broz Tito, who was also the General Secretary of the Central Committee of the KPJ.[2]

Svetozar Vukmanović, a Montenegrin member of the Central Committee was appointed to command the Provincial Military Staff for Bosnia-Herzegovina. Vukmanović was widely known by the nickname "Tempo" owing to his constant urging of his subordinates to hurry. Vukmanović-Tempo called a meeting of the Provincial KPJ Committee in Sarajevo on 13 July. This meeting appointed Iso Jovanović, the secretary of the Provincial KPJ Committee, and Boriša Kovačević as the other two members of the Provincial Military Staff for Bosnia-Herzegovina, and redesignated the four oblast military committees as "military staffs". One member of the Provincial KPJ Committee was sent to each of the three military staffs outside Sarajevo to assist them. Đuro Pucar-Stari, a native of Bosansko Grahovo in the Krajina was sent to Banja Luka, Uglješa Danilović, a native of Odžak in northeastern Bosnia was sent to Tuzla, and Avdo Humo was sent to his home town of Mostar.[3] The leaders at the district level in each region were appointed as military commissioners, and this was repeated at the village level if KPJ members or sympathisers existed.[4]

July uprising[edit | edit source]

On 27 July, an uprising broke out in the Krajina, triggered by the ambush and killing of a Croatian Home Guard officer. This had resulted in the rounding up and maltreatment of ethnic Serb villagers in the Bosansko Grahovo district. The local KPJ structures were not ready to launch an uprising, and had no instructions to do so. They were drawn into a mass Serb uprising not of their creation, and quickly had to adapt to their circumstances.[5] The following day, an uprising broke out in the Romanija region, and this was followed by an outbreak of resistance in the Birač region on 5 August. The forces involved in this fighting were spontaneously formed companies based on the traditional social structure of villages, which were grouped into battalions when numbers dictated. Where the opportunity arose, KPJ members and military staff at the district and village level would attempt to gain some control over these units, but they were far from communist-led as a whole, at least initially. KPJ-led rebels across Bosnia-Herzegovina formed military structures as needed, without any central direction, and brigades and even a division were formed.[6] In the Drvar district for example, units were known as "Guerilla" rather than "Partisan" detachments, and in some cases several companies formed a detachment, where in others, several detachments formed a company.[7]

Establishment of a uniform system of organisation[edit | edit source]

On 26 September 1941, the General Staff for the People's Liberation Partisan Detachments of Yugoslavia held a conference at Stolice in the German-occupied territory of Serbia, at which it adopted a standard organisational structure for the military organisation of the resistance. The General Staff was renamed the Supreme Staff, and the Military Staff of each province became the General Staff. The basic Partisan unit was to be a company of 80–100 soldiers, composed of platoons and sections. Two to four companies were to make up a battalion, and three to four battalions formed a detachment, the largest unit of the Partisan forces. Each detachment would have a staff consisting of a commander and deputy, with a political commissar and deputy, and the detachment staff would be directly responsible to the General Staff. On that basis, the existing Partisan units operating in Bosnia-Herzegovina were re-organised in October and November 1941 into ten detachments, six in east Bosnia, three in Bosanska Krajina, and one in Herzegovina. The Sarajevo and Tuzla Military Staffs were dissolved and detachments in those regions were placed under the direct control of the General Staff for the People's Liberation Partisan Detachments of Bosnia-Herzegovina.[8]

The "Volunteer Army"[edit | edit source]

As a result of simmering tension between Serb-chauvinists and the communists, the Provincial Committee of the KPJ for Bosnia-Herzegovina held a conference at Ivančići in the Romanija region on 7–8 January 1942. This conference was chaired by Tito, and one of the outcomes was the creation of a "Volunteer Army" of soldiers that would fight alongside the Partisans under shared command, but were not willing to become Partisans themselves.[9] The Supreme Staff was renamed the Supreme Staff for the People's Liberation Partisan and Volunteer Army of Yugoslavia. This was intended to drive a wedge between Bosnian Chetnik bands and the Serbian-based Chetnik movement of Draža Mihailović. Seven "volunteer" detachments were raised, all in eastern Bosnia, and some battalions and companies of former Chetniks were placed under the command of existing detachments. In all, the "Volunteer Army" numbered a maximum of 7,000–8,000 fighters of "dubious political loyalty and military value".[10] The short-lived "Volunteer Army" concept was dispensed with following pro-Chetnik coups in both "volunteer" and Partisan detachments in eastern Bosnia in April and May 1942,[11] and was quietly abolished by Tito in November 1942. After this, until the formation of the Yugoslav Army in the last six months of the war, the title of the Partisan army was the People's Liberation Army and Partisan Detachments of Yugoslavia.[12]

Detachments[edit | edit source]

Detachment Date of formation Place of formation Strength Composition Superior headquarters Disestablished Re-established/Re-organised Notes/Footnotes
Banja Luka May 1943 Central Bosnia
4 companies (August 1943)
2 battalions (September 1943)
11th Division (from 1 June 1943)
1st Corps (from 19 July 1943)
39th Division (from 26 March 1944)
1. 13 January 1944
2. May 1945
18 February 1944 [13]
Bijeljina 15 August 1941
Substaff Majevica 1 September 1941
[13]
Bileća September 1943
30–100
23 November 1943 –7 December 1944 October 1944 [13]
Birač 15 August 1941 Birač 500–700 (Autumn 1941)
200–300 (October 1943)
3 battalions (December 1941) 1st Corps (May 1943) 15 February 1945
[13] One of the 10 Bosnia-Herzegovina detachments following the Stolice re-organisation[14]
Birač-Kladanj 15 February 1945
27th Division 11 May 1945
[13]
Bišina November 1943
30–100
23 November 1943
[13]
Blagaj 1943
10th Division 6 September 1943
[13]
Blagaj-Janj 6 September 1943
250 (1943) 2 companies (November 1943) 10th Division
[15]
Cazin 8 September 1943 Cazin 262 (8 September 1943) 2 battalions (8 September 1943)
8 February 1944
[15]
Cazin Krajina 15 March 1944 Cazin 808 (15 March 1944) 3 battalions (15 March 1944)
3 battalions (February 1945)
Una Operational Group (15 March 1944) 1. May 1944
2. September 1944
3. May 1945
1. re-established August 1944
2. re-established February 1945
[16]
Cikote 15 August 1941
86 (20 August 1941)
Birač district headquarters 20 September 1941 redesignated as a company (20 September 1941) [15]
Crni Vrh 18 October 1943 Prnjavor 100 (18 October 1943) 2 companies 11th Division late December 1944
[15]
Dabar September 1943
30–100
23 November 1943
also known as the "Miro Popara" Detachment[15]
Doboj-Derventa November 1943 Doboj district 100 (mid-November 1943)
11th Division (mid-November 1943) 13 January 1944
[15]
Drina Volunteer 13 March 1942 Goražde and Čajniče districts 880 3 battalions
23 May 1942
[15]
Drvar-Petrovac May 1943 Drvar district 300 (May 1943)
883 (November 1943)
5 companies
2 battalions (August 1943)
2nd Corps (May 1943)
4th Division (late 1943)
January 1945
also known as the Grabovač Detachment[15]
Dulići November 1943
30–100
23 November 1944
also known as the Gatački Detachment[15]
Duvno 30 October 1943 Duvno district
2 companies 8th Corps (autumn 1943)
5th Corps (April 1944)
11 April 1944
[15]
Foča Volunteer 24 February 1942
4 battalions
18 May 1942
[15][lower-alpha 1]
Glamoč October 1943
20th Division (October 1943)
10th Division (February 1944)
10 October 1944
[15]
Glamoč Guerilla 30 July 1941
[15]
Glamoč-Livno April 1943 Glamoč district
2 battalions (May 1943)
3 battalions and one company (June 1943)
10th Division (end of April 1943)
[18]
Grabovac 15 August 1941
60 (20 August 1941)
Birač district headquarters
[18]
Gradiška-Lijevče 20 November 1943 Lijevče 80 (20 November 1943)
400+ (September 1944)
3 companies (end of 1943)
2 battalions (September 1944)
5th Corps (20 November 1943)
Kozara Group (28 July 1944)
12 October 1944
also known as Lijevče Detachment[18]
Grahovo-Peulje July 1941 Bosansko Grahovo district 250 (August 1941)
800 (6 September 1943)
2 companies (August 1943)
2 battalions and one company (October 1943)
5th Corps (23 August 1943) 1. September 1941
2. March 1945
re-established August 1943
re-organised October 1943
also known as "Gavrilo Princip" Detachment[18]
Herzegovina October 1941 Suho 330 (14 June 1942) 3 battalions (October 1941) Interim operational staff for Herzegovina (4 January 1942) 1. February 1942
2. 10 August 1942
re-established from North Herzegovina and South Herzegovina Detachments in March 1942 [18] One of the 10 Bosnia-Herzegovina detachments following the Stolice re-organisation, formed from the Herzegovinian Brigade[14]
Jahorina September 1943 Jahorina 250 (September 1943)
27th Division 30 April 1944
[18]
Jahorina Volunteer 21 January 1942
900 (February 1942) 13 companies in 3 battalions (February 1942)
early May 1942
[18]
Jajce-Travnik 18 October 1944
90 (January 1944)
10th Division February 1945
[18]
Janja January 1944 Janja 90 (January 1944)
10th Division 14 October 1944
[18]
Janj
10th Division 6 September 1943
[18]
Japra Guerilla 28 September 1941
Krupa and Sana district headquarters
[18]
Jelašinovci Guerilla 28 September 1941
Krupa and Sana district headquarters
[18]
Kalinovik September 1941
4 battalions
[19] One of the 10 Bosnia-Herzegovina detachments following the Stolice re-organisation, formed from the Bosnian-Herzegovinian Brigade[14]
Kladanj
[20]
Kladanj-Ozren
[21]
Konjic
[22]
Kozara
[23]
Krajina (1st) October 1941 Drvar/
Podgrmeč[14]
600 (October 1941) 7 companies (October 1941) Operational staff for Bosanska Krajina
[24] One of the 10 Bosnia-Herzegovina detachments following the Stolice re-organisation,[14] formed from the Drvar Brigade[25]
Krajina (2nd) October 1941 Kozara[14]
6 companies (October 1941) Operational staff for Bosanska Krajina
[24] One of the 10 Bosnia-Herzegovina detachments following the Stolice re-organisation,[14] formed from the Kozara Detachment[25]
Krajina (3rd) November 1941 central Bosnia[14]
6 battalions (26 November 1941) Operational staff for Bosanska Krajina
[24] One of the 10 Bosnia-Herzegovina detachments following the Stolice re-organisation[14]
Krajina (4th) February 1942
Operational staff for Bosanska Krajina
Formed from elements of the 3rd Krajina Detachment[25]
Krajina (5th) February 1942
Operational staff for Bosanska Krajina
Formed from elements of the 1st Krajina Detachment[25]
Krajina (6th) 1 May 1942 Manjača 1000 (17 August 1942) 1 battalion (May 1942)
3 battalions (17 August 1942)
Operational staff for Bosanska Krajina 1. 20 May 1942
2. 22 October 1942
re-established 17 August 1942 [16]
Krajina Volunteer
[26]
Kupres-Janj May 1943 Kupres
2 companies (May 1943) 10th Division (May 1943) June 1943
[16]
Kupres 27 July 1943
230 (October 1943) 1 battalion 10th Division September 1943
also known as the Blagaj Detachment or Blagaj-Janj Detachment[16]
Lim 4 November 1943 Rudo and Višegrad districts 150 (November 1943) 3 battalions (November 1943) 2nd Shock Corps (4 November 1943) 15 December 1943
[16]
Livno 14 October 1941 Cincar
one company (14 October 1941) 20th Division (October 1943)
5th Corps (February 1944)
1. 6 June 1942
2. 11 April 1944
re-established (September 1943) [16]
Livno-Duvno 11 April 1944 Livno and Duvno districts 1000 (end of 1944) two battalions (11 April 1944)
6 battalions (end of 1944)
10th Division (July 1944) 17 March 1945
[16]
Ljubinje October 1944 Herzegovina
7 December 1944
[16]
Majevica August 1941 Majevica 50 (September 1941)
200 (November 1941)
2 companies (August 1941)
1 battalion and 2 companies (November 1941)
1. September 1941
2. March 1942
re-established September 1941 [16] One of the 10 Bosnia-Herzegovina detachments following the Stolice re-organisation[14]
Majevica (1st) 28 July 1942 Majevica 300 (28 November 1942) 2 battalions (28 November 1942)
3 battalions (January 1943)
25 March 1943
[16]
Majevica (2nd) February 1943 Majevica 500 (July 1943) 3 battalions
4 battalions (July 1943)
1st Bosnian Shock Corps 10 October 1943
[16]
Majevica (3rd) November 1943 Majevica
2–4 battalions 16th Division (November 1943)
38th Division (6 March 1944)
11 May 1945
[16]
Manjača 11 August 1941
[27]
Mostar 16 March 1944 Konjic district 230 2 battalions
25 May 1944
[27]
Motajica 11 November 1943 Motajica
1 company
3 companies (April 1944)
11th Division (11 November 1943)
53rd Division (August 1944)
1. 13 January 1944
2. May 1945
14 February 1944 [27]
Nevesinje Uprising November 1943
30–100
[27]
North Herzegovina
4 battalions (April 1942)
3 battalions (23 November 1943)
29th Division (23 November 1943) 1. June 1942
2. 18 April 1944
re-established November 1943 [28]
Ozren August 1941 Ozren 500
1,000 (November 1941)
230 (November 1943)
3 companies
4 battalions (November 1941)
5 battalions (February 1942)
17th Division (21 July 1943) 1. 18 April 1942
2. 25 January 1944
21 July 1943 [27] One of the 10 Bosnia-Herzegovina detachments following the Stolice re-organisation[14]
Palanka 28 September 1941
Krupa and Sana district headquarters
[27]
Papraća 15 August 1941
100 (20 August 1941)
Birač district headquarters 20 September 1941 redesignated as a company (20 September 1941) [13]
Planina August 1943 Herzegovina
September 1943
[27]
Pljeva 8 October 1943 Mrkonjić Grad district 150 (March 1944) 2 companies (March 1944)
4 companies (mid-1944)
10th Division (October 1943)
39th Division (26 March 1944)
January 1945
also known as the Mrkonjić Detachment or Mrkonjić-Pljeva Detachment[27]
Podgrmeč 7 May 1943 Podgrmeč 300–500 3 companies (May 1943) 4th Division (7 May 1943)
Grmeč Operational Group (12 July 1943)
2nd Corps (8 September 1943)
4th Division (end of 1943)
39th Division (September 1944)
12 July 1945
[27]
Podrinje-Semberija August 1943 Bijeljina region
17th Division (Autumn 1943) early October 1943
[27]
Popovo September 1943
30–100
23 November 1943
[27]
Posavina 16 September 1943 Bosanski Šamac district 250
700 (December 1943)
3 battalions (November 1943) 17th Division (Autumn 1943) early February 1944
[27]
Posavina-Trebava February 1944
270 3 battalions (Autumn 1944) 38th Division (early March 1944) early June 1945
[27]
Površ August 1943
23 November 1943
[27]
Prekaja Guerilla 31 July 1941
Bosansko Grahovo County Guerilla Detachment staff
[27]
Prnjavor 10 June 1943 Prnjavor 1,000 (September 1943) 1 battalion
4 or 5 battalions (September 1943)
11th Division 1. 13 January 1944
2. July 1944
re-organised 16 October 1943
re-established 18 February 1944
[28]
Prozor July 1943
October 1944
[28]
Rama February 1943 Prozor district 80
180 (November 1943)
2 battalions 10th Division (July 1943) 1. February 1943
2. 14 May 1944
re-established July 1943 [28]
Ribnik
Crkveno district 250
900 (August 1943)
2 battalions 4th Division (Summer 1943)
Grmeč Operational Group (August 1943)
10th Division (end of 1943)
1. 26 August 1943
2. 26 March 1944
re-established 18 November 1943 [28]
Rogatica Volunteer
950 3 battalions
May 1942
[28]
Romanija
Romanija region 1,230–3000 (November 1941)
70–80 (August 1943)
500 (20 November 1943)
3 battalions (5 October 1941)
9 battalions (November 1941)
3 battalions (February 1942)
Sarajevo oblast staff (October 1941)
General Staff for Bosnia-Herzegovina (to 3 February 1942)
Operational Staff for East Bosnia (3 February 1942)
17th Division (Summer 1943)
27th Division (10 October 1943)
17th Division (4 March 1944)
27th Division 10 October 1944
1. May 1942
2. 20 May 1944
re-established August 1943 [28] One of the 10 Bosnia-Herzegovina detachments following the Stolice re-organisation[14]
Sana
100 (November 1943) 2 companies (November 1943) 4th Division 26 March 1944
[28]
Sitnica 26 June 1944
29th Division (August 1944) 7 December 1944
[28]
South Herzegovina February 1942
300 (23 November 1943) 4 battalions (April 1942)
3 battalions (23 November 1943)
29th Division (23 November 1943) 1. June 1942
2. 10 September 1944
re-established 23 November 1943 [18]
Spreča 15 August 1941
60 (20 August 1941)
Birač district headquarters 20 October 1941
[28]
Srebrenica 9 October 1943 Fakovići 16–50 (December 1943)
727 (27 March 1944)
600 (March 1945)
1. late December 1943
2. early April 1945
re-established 5 March 1944
re-organised into 2 battalions on 27 March 1944
[29]
Srebrenica Volunteer March 1942
3 battalions
April 1942
[29]
Stolac September 1943
30–100
1. 23 September 1943
2. 7 December 1944
October 1944 [29]
Stupari 15 August 1941 eastern Bosnia 80 (20 August 1941)
Birač district headquarters 20 October 1941
[29]
Šehovići 15 August 1941 eastern Bosnia 120 (20 August 1941)
Birač district headquarters 20 October 1941
[29]
Šuma September 1943 Herzegovina 30–100
23 November 1943
[29]
Tešanj-Teslić 18 September 1943 eastern Bosnia 50
11th Division 1. 13 January 1944
2. 7 September 1944
re-established 18 February 1944 also known as the Tešanj Detachment[29]
Timar 15 May 1944 Prijedor district 600 (September 1944)
4th Division (15 May 1944)
Kozara Group (28 July 1944)
12 October 1944
[29]
Travnik April 1942 Vlašić region 800 (September 1943) 2 companies (Summer 1943)
2 battalions (Autumn 1943)
10th Division (May 1943) 1. 15 May 1942
2. 18 October 1944
re-established May 1943 [29]
Trebava September 1943 Trebava region 160 3 battalions (October 1943) 17th Division (September 1943)
16th Division (October 1943)
February 1944
[29]
Trebinje October 1944
7 December 1944
[29]
Tupanar 15 August 1941 eastern Bosnia 100 (20 August 1941)
Birač district headquarters 20 September 1941
also known as the Trnavski Detachment[29]
Tuzla 24 October 1943 Tuzla region 600
500 (Winter 1945)
4 battalions 17th Division May 1945
[29]
Udarni 2 December 1943 Bosanska Krajina region
3 battalions 5th Corps 5 May 1944
[29]
Udrežanj September 1943 Herzegovina 30–100
October 1943
[29]
Visoko-Fojnica September 1944 Kotor Varoš district 100
53rd Division (September 1944) April 1945
[30]
Visoko-Fojnica 17 July 1943 Kreševo district
10th Division 8 January 1945
[30]
Vlahovići September 1943 Herzegovina 30–100
23 November 1945
[30]
Vlasenica Volunteer March 1942
700 4 battalions
April 1942
[30]
Vlašić May 1944 Travnik district 100 2 companies 4th Division
Zenica Brigade Group (March 1945)
May 1945
[30]
Vukovsko 27 July 1943 Kupres district 100
10th Division (Summer 1943) January 1944
[30]
West Herzegovina September 1944 Duge Njive 100 (September 1943) 4 companies (September 1944) South Dalmatia Group (September 1944)
29th Division (November 1944)
7 December 1944
[30]
Zenica 9 April 1942 Zenica 200
6 May 1942
[30]
Zmijanje 29 November 1943 Mrkonjić Grad district 180
5th Corps (29 November 1943)
4th Division (4 December 1943)
39th Division (26 March 1944)
May 1945
[30]
Zvijezda October 1941 Zvijezda region 1,200 (November 1941) 4 battalions and 1 company (November 1941)
May 1942
[30] One of the 10 Bosnia-Herzegovina detachments following the Stolice re-organisation[14]

Notes[edit | edit source]

  1. On 18 May 1942, the staff of the detachment were killed or forced to flee by Chetnik elements from its Zakmur Battalion[17]

Footnotes[edit | edit source]

  1. Hoare 2006, pp. 28–29.
  2. Hoare 2006, pp. 29–30.
  3. Hoare 2006, pp. 30–31.
  4. Hoare 2006, p. 32.
  5. Hoare 2006, p. 33.
  6. Hoare 2006, pp. 76–78.
  7. Hoare 2006, p. 82.
  8. Hoare 2006, pp. 82–83.
  9. Hoare 2006, pp. 175–176.
  10. Hoare 2006, pp. 183–184.
  11. Hoare 2006, pp. 205–208.
  12. Hoare 2006, p. 319.
  13. 13.0 13.1 13.2 13.3 13.4 13.5 13.6 13.7 Anić, Joksimović & Gutić 1982, pp. 590–591.
  14. 14.00 14.01 14.02 14.03 14.04 14.05 14.06 14.07 14.08 14.09 14.10 14.11 14.12 Hoare 2006, p. 83.
  15. 15.00 15.01 15.02 15.03 15.04 15.05 15.06 15.07 15.08 15.09 15.10 15.11 15.12 Anić, Joksimović & Gutić 1982, pp. 592–593.
  16. 16.00 16.01 16.02 16.03 16.04 16.05 16.06 16.07 16.08 16.09 16.10 16.11 Anić, Joksimović & Gutić 1982, pp. 598–599.
  17. Hoare 2006, p. 207.
  18. 18.00 18.01 18.02 18.03 18.04 18.05 18.06 18.07 18.08 18.09 18.10 18.11 18.12 Anić, Joksimović & Gutić 1982, pp. 594–595.
  19. Anić, Joksimović & Gutić 1982, pp. 83–84.
  20. Hoare 2014, p. 143.
  21. Anić, Joksimović & Gutić 1982, p. 801.
  22. Anić, Joksimović & Gutić 1982, p. 345.
  23. Anić, Joksimović & Gutić 1982, p. 343.
  24. 24.0 24.1 24.2 Anić, Joksimović & Gutić 1982, p. 78.
  25. 25.0 25.1 25.2 25.3 Hoare 2006, p. 245.
  26. Anić, Joksimović & Gutić 1982, p. 128.
  27. 27.00 27.01 27.02 27.03 27.04 27.05 27.06 27.07 27.08 27.09 27.10 27.11 27.12 27.13 27.14 Anić, Joksimović & Gutić 1982, pp. 600–601.
  28. 28.0 28.1 28.2 28.3 28.4 28.5 28.6 28.7 28.8 28.9 Anić, Joksimović & Gutić 1982, pp. 602–603.
  29. 29.00 29.01 29.02 29.03 29.04 29.05 29.06 29.07 29.08 29.09 29.10 29.11 29.12 29.13 29.14 Anić, Joksimović & Gutić 1982, pp. 604–605.
  30. 30.0 30.1 30.2 30.3 30.4 30.5 30.6 30.7 30.8 30.9 Anić, Joksimović & Gutić 1982, pp. 606–607.

References[edit | edit source]

  • Anić, Nikola; Joksimović, Sekula; Gutić, Mirko (1982) (in Serbo-Croatian). Narodnooslobodilačka vojska Jugoslavije: pregled razvoja oružanih snaga Narodnooslobodilačkog pokreta : 1941–1945 [People's Liberation Army of Yugoslavia: Overview of the Development of the Armed Forces of the National Liberation Movement: 1941–1945]. Belgrade, Yugoslavia: Vojnoistorijski institut. OCLC 9831057. 
  • Hoare, Marko Attila (2006). Genocide and Resistance in Hitler's Bosnia: The Partisans and the Chetniks 1941–1943. New York, New York: Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-726380-8. 
  • Hoare, Marko Attila (2014). The Bosnian Muslims in the Second World War. New York, New York: Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-936531-9. http://books.google.com/books?id=Pf8EAQAAQBAJ. 

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