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This article is a list of Royal Norwegian Navy fleet units and vessels, both past and present.

Ships from the years 1509 to 1814 might be listed under Royal Dano-Norwegian Navy.

Fleet units and vessels (present)[]

Frigate branch[]

HNoMS Fridtjof Nansen

  • Support vessels:
    • Horten (A530), training vessel[5]
    • Reinøysund (L4502), support vessel (former landing vessel)
    • Rotsund (L4505), support vessel (former landing vessel)
  • Royal Yacht:
    • Norge (A553) (formerly Philante, a private yacht of British ownership; escort vessel during WWII)

Mine branch[]

Alta class mine sweeper Rauma

  • 1st Mine Clearing Squadron
    • Oksøy class mine hunter (1994)
      • Oksøy M340
      • Karmøy M341
      • Måløy M342
      • Hinnøy M343
    • Alta class mine sweeper (1996):
      • Alta M350
      • Otra M351
      • Rauma M352
      • Orkla M353 (Ship sunk due to fire on 19 November 2002)
      • Glomma M354
  • Minesweeper/minelayer:
  • Mine Clearance Command (divers)

Submarine branch[]

Ula class submarine

The submarine fleet consists of several Ula class submarines.

  • 1st Submarine Squadron (Diesel-electric Ula class submarines):

MTB branch[]

Skjold class missile patrol boat HNoMS Skjold

The Coastal Warfare fleet consists of six brand new Skjold class missile patrol boats. The boat type is often branded a corvette.

  • Missile Torpedo Boat Command
    • Missile Patrol Boat (Skjold class):
      • Skjold (P960)
      • Storm (P961)
      • Skudd (P962)
      • Steil (P963)
      • Glimt (P964)
      • Gnist (P965)

Naval Ranger branch[]

A Norwegian Combat Boat 90

  • Norwegian Naval Special Operations Commando (Naval Ranger Command)
  • Coastal Ranger Command
  • Norwegian Mine Diver Command
  • Tactical Boat Squadron
    • Combat Boat 90 (1996)
      • Trondenes
      • Skrolsvik
      • Kråkenes
      • Stangnes
      • Kjøkøy
      • Mørvika
      • Kopås
      • Tangen
      • Oddane
      • Malmøya
      • Hysnes
      • Brettingen
      • Løkhaug
      • Søviknes
      • Hellen
      • Osternes
      • Fjell
      • Lerøy
      • Torås
      • Møvik

Logistics branch[]

In the process of establishing a "logistics on keel" system.

Coast Guard units and vessels[]

Coast Guard vessel Harstad in Harstad

Coast Guard vessel NoCGV Nordkapp patroling at Svalbard

Coast Guard vessel Ålesund in Bergen

  • Coast Guard Squadron North
  • Future Vessels
    • 6 vessels of the Nornen class ordered
    • 3 new hybrid diesel-LNG vessels, two to be named Barentshav and Sortland and one unnamed ordered

Naval schools[]

  • Royal Norwegian Naval Basic Training Establishment, HNoMS Harald Haarfagre, Stavanger
  • Royal Norwegian Navy Officer Candidate School, Horten
  • Royal Norwegian Naval Academy, Laksevåg, Bergen
  • Royal Norwegian Naval Training Establishment, HNoMS Tordenskjold, Haakonsvern, Bergen

Navy vessels (past)[]

Several earlier battleships are listed under Denmark.

Amphibious landing vessels[]

    • Kvalsund class
      • Kvalsund (1968–1991)
      • Raftsund
    • Reinøysund (2) class
      • Reinøysund Still in use or in reserve?
      • Rotsund Still in use or in reserve?
      • Borgsund
      • Sørøysund (L4503) (Later rebuilt to Tjeldsund class)
      • Maursund (L4504) (Later rebuilt to Tjeldsund class)
    • Tjeldsund class
      • Tjeldsund (L4506)

Armed auxiliaries[]

Naval trawler HNoMS Honningsvåg

    • Alpha (1904–1940?) patrol boat
    • Alversund (1926–1940) patrol boat, sunk by own crew.
    • Andenes (?–1940?) patrol boat
    • Aud I (?–1940?) patrol boat
    • Bergholm used as MCM vessel and Shetland Bus.
    • Beta (1900–1940?) patrol boat
    • Bjerk (1912–?) patrol boat
    • Blink (1896–1940?) patrol boat
    • Blåsel patrol boat
    • Commonwealth (1912–1940?) patrol boat
    • Honningsvåg, naval trawler, originally the German trawler Malangen, captured by Norwegian forces at Honningsvåg 13 April 1940
    • Pol III, armed whaler; engaged German Kampfgruppe 5 on 8 April 1940, its captain, Leif Welding-Olsen, became the first Norwegian uniformed casualty of WWII
    • Bodø Sunk by a mine in 1943

Brigs[]

    • Allart (1807/1825–1825)[1]
    • Alsen (1808/1814–1837)[1]
    • Fredriksværn (1817–1854)[1]
    • Hemnæs (1814–1821)[1]
    • Kiel (1809/1814–1817)[1]
    • Langeland (1808/1814–1827)[1]
    • Lolland (1818–1847)[1]
    • Lougen (1805/1814–1882)[1]
    • Samsøe (1808/1814–1820)[1]
    • Seagull (1808/1814–1817) Launched 1805. Captured from the Royal Navy off Lindesnes 19 June 1808.[1]
    • Statsraad Erichsen (1859–1900)[1]

Coastal defence ships[]

HNoMS Tordenskjold at Kiel in 1900

Corvettes[]

    • Ellida (1849–1866)[1]
    • Ellida (1882–1925)[1]
    • Nordstjernen (1844–1858)[1]
    • Nordstjernen (1864–1940/1945)[1]
    • Nornen (1855–1903)[1]
    • Nidaros (1851–1903)[1]
    • Ørnen (1829–1874)[1]
    • Ørnen (1849–1866)[1]
    • Flower class Six vessels received from the Royal Navy
      • Andenes ex. HMS Acanthus
      • Nordkyn ex. HMS Buttercup
      • Eglantine ex. HMS Eglantine
      • Montbretia ex. HMS Montbretia Sunk by U-262 on 18 November 1942.
      • Potentilla (1942–1944) ex. HMS Potentilla
      • Rose ex. HMS Rose
    • Castle class One vessel received from the Royal Navy
      • Tunsberg Castle ex. HMS Shrewsbury Castle was sunk by a mine near Båtsfjord, Norway on 12 December 1944.
    • Sleipner class Two vessels built.
      • Sleipner (1965–1992)
      • Æger (1967–1992)

Destroyers[]

HNoMSDraug - lead ship of the Draug class

HNoMS Sleipner - lead ship of the Sleipner class

    • Sleipner class Six vessels made in Norway from 1936 to 1939.
      • Sleipner (1936–1959) In Norwegian service during the war. Rebuilt to frigate in 1948.
      • Gyller (1938–1959) In German hands from 1940 to 1945. Rebuilt to frigate in 1948.
      • Æger (1936–1940)[1] Sunk by German bombers 9 April 1940, at the beginning of Operation Weserübung after first sinking the German supply ship Roda and shooting down two Luftwaffe bombers.
      • Odin (1939–1959) In German hands from 1940 to 1945. Rebuilt to frigate in 1948.
      • Balder (1946–1959) In German hands from 1940 to 1945. Rebuilt to frigate in 1948.[1]
      • Tor (1946–1959) In German hands from 1940 to 1945. Rebuilt to frigate in 1948.
    • S class aka. Savage class
    • Town class Five vessels on loan from the Royal Navy.

HNoMS St. Albans at sea while named USS Thomas.

[1]

Frigates[]

Oslo class frigate Oslo in the North Atlantic, October 1971

    • Freia (1828–1870)[1]
    • Desideria (1854–1920)[1]
    • St Olaf (1860–1925)[1]
    • Kong Sverre (1864–1932)
    • Oslo class Five vessels built.
    • River class Formerly Canadian
      • Draug (1956–1964) Ex. HMCS Penetang (K676)
      • Garm (1956–1977) Ex. HCMS Toronto Rebuilt in 1965 to serve as support vessel for torpedo boats under the name Valkyrien.
      • Troll (1959–1973) Rebuilt in 1965 to serve as support vessel for submarines under the name HNoMS Horten.

Cutters[]

    • Built at Trondhjems Skibsverft, Trondheim
      • Capitaine Hans Peter Holm (1813/1814–1831)[1]
      • General von Krogh (1813/1814–1831)[1]
    • Captured from Sweden
      • Gripen (1813/1814–1815)[1]

Schooners[]

    • Built at Georgernes Verft, Bergen
      • Thor (1805–1810)[1]
      • Balder (1805–1810)[1]
      • Odin (1808/1814–1839)[1]
      • Valkyrjen (1808/1814–1839)[1]
      • Nornen (1810/1814–1839)[1]
      • Hother (1810/1814–1839)[1]
      • Thor (1811/1814–1839)[1]
      • Balder (1811/1814–1839)[1]
    • Built at Trondhjems Skibsverft, Trondheim
      • Patrioten Georg (1808/1814–?)[1]
      • Trondhjem (1808/1814-?)[1]
      • Borgersamfundet (1808/1814–?)[1]
      • Axel Thorsen (1810/1814–1863)[1]
      • Skjøn Valborg (1810/1814–1863)[1]
    • "Bombgun schooners"
      • Sleipner (1840–1866)[1]
      • Vale (1843–1866)[1]
      • Uller (1845–1877)[1]
    • Steam powered schooners
      • Gyller (1848–1905)[1]
      • Gler (1850–1905)[1]
      • Alfen (1859–1903) Rerigged and rebuilt as corvette in 1877.[1]
    • Paddlesteam schooners
      • Nordcap (1840–1870)[1]
      • Æger (1852–1891)[1]
      • Vidar (1855–1872)[1]

Sloops[]

Sloops, several of which were later rebuilt as 3. class gunboats.

    • Arendal launched between 1840 and 1845. Rebuilt 1875.[1]
    • Augvaldsnæs launched between 1840 and 1845.[1]
    • Bergen launched between 1840 and 1845.[1]
    • Bodøe launched between 1840 and 1845.[1]
    • Bragernæs launched between 1840 and 1845.[1]
    • Brevig launched between 1840 and 1845. Rebuilt 1875, then used as a minelayer.[1]
    • Christiansund launched between 1840 and 1845.[1]
    • Drøbak launched between 1840 and 1845. Rebuilt 1872 to a catamaran steam gunboat and renamed Trold.[1]
    • Egersund launched between 1840 and 1845.[1]
    • Farsund launched between 1840 and 1845.[1]
    • Flekkefjord launched between 1840 and 1845.[1]
    • Fredrikshald launched between 1840 and 1845.[1]
    • Hammerfest launched between 1840 and 1845.[1]
    • Holmestrand launched between 1840 and 1845.[1]
    • Horten launched between 1840 and 1845. Rebuilt 1875 and used as a minelayer.[1]
    • Høievarde launched between 1840 and 1845.[1]
    • Kaholmen launched between 1840 and 1845.[1]
    • Karmøe launched between 1840 and 1845. Rebuilt 1883 and used as a minelayer.[1]
    • Kongsberg launched between 1840 and 1845. Rebuilt 1875. Stricken 1905.[1]
    • Kristiansand aka. Christiansand launched between 1840 and 1845. Rebuilt 1875 and used as a minelayer.[1]
    • Langesund launched between 1840 and 1845. Rebuilt 1875. Stricken 1905.[1]
    • Larvik aka. Laurvig launched between 1840 and 1845. Rebuilt 1875.[1]
    • Levanger launched between 1840 and 1845.[1]
    • Lillesand launched between 1840 and 1845. Rebuilt 1875 and used as a minelayer.[1]
    • Lindesnæs launched between 1840 and 1845.[1]
    • Molde launched between 1840 and 1845.[1]
    • Moss launched between 1840 and 1845.[1]
    • Munkholmen launched between 1840 and 1845.[1]
    • Namsos launched between 1840 and 1845.[1]
    • Porsgrund launched between 1840 and 1845. Rebuilt 1875. Stricken 1905.[1]
    • Sarpsborg launched between 1840 and 1845. Rebuilt 1872 as a catamaran steam gunboat and renamed Trold. Stricken 1905.[1]
    • Skeen launched between 1840 and 1845. Rebuilt 1875. Stricken 1905.[1]
    • Skudenæs launched between 1840 and 1845. Rebuilt 1883. Stricken 1905.[1]
    • Soon launched between 1840 and 1845.[1]
    • Stat launched between 1840 and 1845.[1]
    • Strømsøe launched between 1840 and 1845. Rebuilt 1872 as a catamaran steam gunboat and renamed Nøk. Stricken 1903.[1]
    • Svelvigen launched between 1840 and 1845. Rebuilt 1872 as a steam gunboat and renamed Dverg. Stricken 1905.[1]
    • Sverresborg launched between 1840 and 1845.[1]
    • Tananger launched between 1840 and 1845.[1]
    • Tangen launched between 1840 and 1845.[1]
    • Tromsøe launched between 1840 and 1845.[1]
    • Trondhjem launched between 1840 and 1845.[1]
    • Tønsberg launched between 1840 and 1845. Rebuilt 1875. Stricken 1905.[1]
    • Udsire launched between 1840 and 1845.[1]
    • Vardøe launched between 1840 and 1845.[1]
    • Vardøhuus launched between 1840 and 1845.[1]
    • Aalesund launched between 1840 and 1845.[1]
    • Aaasgaardstrand launched between 1840 and 1845. Rebuilt 1875 and used as a minelayer.[1]

Gunboats[]

1. class gunsboat HNoMS Ellida

2. class gunboat of the Vale series

    • 2. class
      • Vale class
        • Vale (1874–1947) Rebuilt to minelayer in 1911.[1]
        • Brage (1878–1946) Rebuilt to minelayer in 1912.[1]
        • Nor (1878–1949) Rebuilt to minelayer in 1912.[1]
        • Uller (1876–1940) Rebuilt to minelayer in 1911.[1]
        • Vidar (1882–1947) Rebuilt to minelayer in 1911.[1]
      • Gor class
        • Gor (1884–1945) Rebuilt to minelayer in 1913.[1]
        • Tyr (1887–1945) Rebuilt to minelayer in 1913.[1]
      • Æger (1894–1932) [1]

Steam powered gunboats[]

    • Rjukan (1861–1893)[1]
    • Sarpen (1861–1940)[1]
    • Lougen (1864–1903)[1]
    • Glommen (1864–1903)[1]

Submarine chasers[]

Submarine chaser HNoMS King Haakon VII

Submarines[]

    • Kobben (1909–1933)[1] Renamed A-1 in 21 February 1913. The tower of Kobben is preserved at the Royal Navy Officers' Training School at Horten.
    • A class Three vessels were bought in 1913, a fourth was ordered in 1914 (A-5) but was confiscated by the Imperial German Navy at the outbreak of World War I.
      • A-2 (1914–1940)[1]
      • A-3 (1914–1940)[1]
      • A-4 (1914–1940)[1]
      • A-5 Confiscated by Germany, named UA in 1914 and never entered Norwegian service.[1]

B class submarines B-2, B-3 and B-4

    • B class Six vessels of the US Holland type built on licence in Norway from 1922 to 1929.
      • B-1 (1923–1947) Escaped to the Faeroe Islands 8 June 1940, later used as a training vessel in Scotland.[1]
      • B-2 (1924–1940) Captured by the Germans on 11 April.[1]
      • B-3 (1926–1940) Scuttled by own crew on 10 April to prevent German capture.[1]
      • B-4 (1927–1940) Captured by the Germans on 10 April.[1]
      • B-5 (1929–1940) Captured by the Germans on 11 April and renamed UC 1.[1]
      • B-6 (1930–1940) Surrendered to German troops on 18 April under threat of bombing of Florø city. Named UC 2 in German service.[1]
    • U class
      • Uredd ex. HMS P41, (1941–1943)
      • Ula ex. HMS Varne, (1943–1965), Given to Norway by the UK in 1943
    • V class
      • Utstein, ex. HMS Venturer, sold to Norway in 1946.
      • Uthaug, ex. HMS Votary, sold to Norway in 1946.
      • Utvær, ex. HMS Viking, sold to Norway in 1946.
      • Utsira, ex. HMS Variance
    • K class
      • Kya, ex-U-926
      • Kaura, ex-U-995
      • Kinn, ex-U-1202
    • Kobben class Fifteen vessels built from 1964 to 1967.

      HNoMS Utstein, a Kobben class submarine

      • Kinn (1964–1982) Deliberately sunk in Bjørnefjorden in 1990.
      • Kya (1964–1991) Transferred to the Royal Danish Navy as HDMS Springeren in 1991.
      • Kobben (1964–2001) Transferred to the Polish Navy as ORP Jastrząb to be used for parts.
      • Kunna (1964–?) Transferred to Poland as ORP Kondor in 2004.
      • Kaura (1965–?) Transferred to Denmark to be used for parts in 1991.
      • Ula (1965–1998) Changed name to Kinn in 1987. Scrapped in 1998.
      • Utsira (1965–1998) Scrapped 1998.
      • Utstein (1965–1998) Transferred to the Royal Norwegian Navy Museum in 1998.
      • Utvær (1965–1989) Transferred to Denmark as HDMS Tumleren in 1989.
      • Uthaug (1966–1990) Transferred to Denmark as HDMS Sælen in 1990.
      • Sklinna (1966–2001) Scrapped in 2001.
      • Skolpen (1966–2002) Transferred to Poland as ORP Sęp in 2002.
      • Stadt (1966–1990) Scrapped.
      • Stord (1967–2002) Transferred to Poland as ORP Sokół in 2002.
      • Svenner (1967–2003) Also a training ship. To Poland as ORP Bielik in 2003.

Minesweepers[]

HNoMS Otra – the RNoN's first purpose built minesweeper

HNoMS Rauma – the RNoN's second purpose-built minesweeper

    • Børtind (1912–?) Refitted guard vessel
    • Otra First purpose built Norwegian minesweeper
    • Rauma Second purpose built Norwegian minesweeper
    • Sauda class
      • Kvina
      • Ogna
      • Sauda
      • Sira
      • Tana
      • Tista
      • Utla
      • Vosso
      • Glomma
      • Alta (M314) (museum vessel)
    • Syrian
    • Nordhav II
    • Drøbak

Minelayers[]

Royal Norwegian Navy minelayer Frøya

Royal Norwegian Navy minelayer Olav Tryggvason

Monitors[]

The Norwegian monitor Skorpionen

HNoMS Nordkapp

Offshore patrol vessels[]

Torpedo boats[]

    • Rap (1873–1920) - the first modern torpedo boat.
    • Ulven (1878–1923)
    • 2. class – 27 built from 1882.
      • Lyn
      • Rask (1885–?)
      • Pil (1886–?)
      • Snar (1887–?)
      • Orm (1888–?)
      • Kjell (1912–1940) Captured by the Germans and used as a patrol boat under the name KT1, later rebuilt as a minesweeper under the name NK.02 Dragoner, sunk 28 September 1944 by British aircraft.

1. class torpedo boat HNoMS Sæl.

    • 1. class Ten vessels built from 1892.
    • 3. class One small harbour and fjord torpedo boat built in 1899.
    • Oter (1888–?)
    • Raket (1894–?)
    • Varg (1894–?)
    • Glimt (1897–?)
    • Djerv (1897–1940) Refitted as minesweeper. Sunk by own crew in Sognefjorden.
    • Storm (1898–1940)
    • Brand (1898–1946)
    • Trods (1898–?)
    • Dristig (1899–1940) Refitted as minesweeper. Sunk by own crew in Sognefjorden.

2. class torpedo boat HNoMS Kjell.

    • Laks (1900–?)
    • Sild (1900–?)
    • Sæl (1901–1940)
    • Skrei (1901–?)
    • Hauk (1902–?)
    • Falk (1902–?)
    • Ørn (1903–?)
    • Ravn (1903–?)
    • Grib (1905–?)
    • Jo (1905–?)
    • Lom (1905–?)
    • Skarv (1906–?)
    • Teist (1907–?)
  • Trygg class Three 256 ton vessels built between 1919 and 1921

    Trygg class torpedo boat HNoMS Snøgg

    • Trygg (1919–1940) Sunk, then salvaged by the Germans in 1940.
    • Snøgg (1920–1940) Captured by the Germans in 1940.
    • Stegg (1921–1940) Sunk in battle in 1940.
  • MTB 5 (1940)
  • MTB 6 (1940–1941)
  • MTB 56 (1941–1942)
  • MTB 345 (1943) Captured by the Germans 28 July 1943, lost in fire the next month
  • Fairmile D class aka D class. Ten vessels were in Norwegian service at the end of WWII. Seven of them were used until 1959.
  • Elco class Ten vessels received from the US Navy as part of a weapons aid program in 1951.
    • Snøgg ex US Navy PT-602
    • Sel ex US Navy PT-603
    • Sild ex US Navy PT-604
    • Skrei ex US Navy PT-605
    • Snar ex US Navy PT-606
    • Springer ex US Navy PT-608
    • Hai ex US Navy PT-609
    • Hauk ex US Navy PT-610
    • Hval ex US Navy PT-611
    • Hvass ex US Navy PT-612
  • Tjeld class aka. Nasty class 20 vessels built in Norway from 1959 to 1966.
    • Tjeld (1959–1992) Renamed Sel. Transferred to Naval Reserve and used by Sea Home Guard. Sold for scrapping 1992.
    • Skarv (1959–1981) Sold to Stapletask Ltd, Sittingbourne, Kent, England.
    • Teist (1960–1981) Sold to Stapletask Ltd, Sittingbourne, Kent, England.
    • Jo (1960–1981) Sold to Stapletask Ltd, Sittingbourne, Kent, England.
    • Lom (1961–1981) Sold to Stapletask Ltd, Sittingbourne, Kent, England.
    • Stegg (1961–1992) Renamed Hval. Transferred to Naval Reserve and used by Naval Home Guard. Sold for scrapping 1992.
    • Hauk (1961–1992) Renamed Laks. Transferred to Naval Reserve and used by Sea Home Guard. Sold for scrapping 1992.
    • Falk (1961–1981) Sold to Stapletask Ltd, Sittingbourne, Kent, England.
    • Ravn (1961–1992) Renamed Knurr. Transferred to Naval Reserve and used by Sea Home Guard. Sold for scrapping 1992.
    • Gribb (1961–?) Renamed Delfin. Transferred to Naval Reserve and used by Sea Home Guard. Was planned to be preserved by Kværner Mandal A/S, but later sold for scrapping.
    • Geir (1962–1981) Sold to Stapletask Ltd, Sittingbourne, Kent, England.
    • Erle (1962–1981) Sold to Stapletask Ltd, Sittingbourne, Kent, England.
    • Sel (1963–1981) Sold to Stapletask Ltd, Sittingbourne, Kent, England.
    • Hval (1964–1981) Sold to Stapletask Ltd, Sittingbourne, Kent, England.
    • Laks (1964–1981) Sold to Stapletask Ltd, Sittingbourne, Kent, England.
    • Hai (1964–?) Transferred to Naval Reserve and used by Sea Home Guard. Plans are currently underway for Hai to be preserved as a museum ship in Fredrikstad.
    • Knurr (1964–1981) Sold to Stapletask Ltd, Sittingbourne, Kent, England.
      • Lyr (1965–1992) Transferred to Naval Reserve and used by Sea Home Guard. Sold for scrapping 1992.
    • Skrei (1965-?) Transferred to Naval Reserve and used by Sea Home Guard. Transferred to the Royan Norwegian Navy Museum and preserved as a museum ship.
    • Delfin (1966–1984) Given to Friends of the Shetland bus as a preservation project, but the project failed and the ship was given to a private person.
  • Rapp class Six vessels built in Norway from 1952 to 1956.
    • Rapp
    • Rask (?–1970)
  • Storm class 20 vessels built from 1965 to 1967.
    • Arg
    • Blink
    • Brann
    • Brask
    • Brott
    • Djerv
    • Glimt
    • Gnist
    • Hvass
    • Kjekk
    • Odd
    • Pil
    • Rokk
    • Skjold
    • Skudd
    • Steil
    • Storm
    • Traust
    • Tross
    • Trygg
  • Snøgg class Six vessels built from 1970 to 1971.
  • Hauk class
    • Hauk (P986)
    • Ørn (P987)
    • Terne (P988)
    • Teist (P991)
    • Tjeld (P989)
    • Lom (P993)
    • Stegg (P994)
    • Ravn (P996)
    • Geir (P998)
    • Skarv (P990)
    • Jo (P992)
    • Falk (P995)
    • Gribb (P997)
    • Erle (P999)

Training vessels, school ships[]

Other ships[]

    • Brabant
    • Ormen Lange longship (Long Serpent)

References[]

Sources[]

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