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Graf-Zeppelin-2

Graf Zeppelin, the only German aircraft carrier to be launched

The German Reich planned several aircraft carriers (Flugzeugträger), some of which made it to the construction stage, and one of which was launched, the German aircraft carrier Graf Zeppelin.

During World War I, there was an attempt by the German Empire to convert the unfinished Italian passenger liner Ausonia into an aircraft carrier, codenamed "I". Plans were also afoot to convert SMS Roon to become a seaplane tender.

During World War II, Nazi Germany attempted to build several aircraft carriers. Two of these were to be of the Graf Zeppelin class, Flugzeugträger A Graf Zeppelin and Flugzeugträger B Peter Strasser. Only the Graf Zeppelin was launched. At the same time, there was an attempt to convert the ocean liner Europa into the carrier codenamed "I". The incomplete German cruiser Seydlitz was also started to be converted into an aircraft carrier.

Key
Aircraft The number and type of aircraft carried
Displacement Ship displacement at full combat load[lower-alpha 1]
Propulsion Number of shafts, type of propulsion system, and top speed/horsepower generated
Service The dates work began and finished on the ship and its ultimate fate
Laid down The date the keel began to be assembled
Commissioned The date the ship was commissioned


I (1915)Edit

Ship Armament Displacement Propulsion Service
Laid down Commissioned Fate
I 8–10 fighters
15–20 bombers/torpedo bombers[2]
12,585 t (12,386 long tons)[3] 2 shafts, 2 steam turbines, 14,000 shp (10,000 kW), 20 kn (37 km/h; 23 mph)[3] 1914[3] Scrapped, 1922[3]

Graf Zeppelin classEdit

Graf-Zeppelin-1

Projected recognition drawing had Graf Zeppelin been completed in 1942

Ship Armament Displacement Propulsion Service
Laid down Commissioned Fate
Graf Zeppelin 12 Bf 109 fighters
30 Ju 87 dive bombers[4]
33,550 long tons (34,088 t)[5] 4 shafts, 4 steam turbines, 200,000 shp (150,000 kW), 33.8 kn (62.6 km/h; 38.9 mph)[3] 28 December 1936[6] Sunk as a target, 24 July 1947[7]
B 30 September 1936[8] Scrapped, 1940[6]

I (1942)Edit

Ship Armament Displacement Propulsion Service
Laid down Commissioned Fate
I 24 Bf 109 fighters
18 Ju 87 dive bombers[9]
55,600 long tons (56,492 t)[10] 4 shafts, 4 steam turbines, 100,000 shp (75,000 kW), 26.5 kn (49.1 km/h; 30.5 mph)[3] 1927[10] Seized by US Army, 1945[9]

Jade classEdit

Ship Armament Displacement Propulsion Service
Laid down Commissioned Fate
Jade 12 Bf 109 fighters
12 Ju 87dive bombers[9]
23,500 t (23,129 long tons)[9] 2 shafts, 2 steam turbines, 26,000 shp (19,000 kW), 19 kn (35 km/h; 22 mph)[9] 1934[9] Sunk, 2 May 1943[9]
Elbe 2 shafts, 2 electric motors, 26,000 shp, 19 kn[9] Seized by Great Britain, 20 June 1946[9]

WeserEdit

Ship Armament Displacement Propulsion Service
Laid down Commissioned Fate
Weser 10 Bf 109 fighters
10 Ju 87 dive bombers[11]
17,139 t (16,868 long tons)[11] 3 shafts, 3 steam turbines, 132,000 shp (98,000 kW), 32 kn (59 km/h; 37 mph)[12] 1936[11] Scrapped, sometime after 1945[11]

IIEdit

Ship Armament Displacement Propulsion Service
Laid down Commissioned Fate
II 11 Bf 109 fighters
12 Ju 87 dive bombers[13]
11,400 long tons (11,583 t)[11] 2 shafts, 2 steam turbines, 10,000 shp (7,500 kW), 32 kn (59 km/h; 37 mph)[14] 1938[11] Returned to France, 1945[13]

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. Historian Erich Gröner states that full load was defined as "[equal to] type displacement plus full load fuel oil, diesel oil, coal, reserve boiler feed water, aircraft fuel, and special equipment."[1]

ReferencesEdit

  1. Gröner, p. ix
  2. Greger, p. 88
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 Gröner, p. 70
  4. Chesneau, pp. 76–77
  5. Gröner, p. 71
  6. 6.0 6.1 Gardiner & Chesneau, p. 226
  7. Shirokorad, pp. 108–112
  8. Fontenoy, p. 244
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 9.3 9.4 9.5 9.6 9.7 9.8 Gröner, p. 74
  10. 10.0 10.1 Gröner, p. 73
  11. 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 Gröner, p. 76
  12. Gröner, pp. 75–76
  13. 13.0 13.1 Gröner, p. 77
  14. Gröner, pp. 76–77

BibliographyEdit

  • Chesneau, Roger (1998). Aircraft Carriers of the World, 1914 to the Present An Illustrated Encyclopedia. London: Brockhampton Press. pp. 288. ISBN 1-86019-875-9. 
  • Fontenoy, Paul E. (2006). Aircraft Carriers: An Illustrated History of Their Impact. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO. ISBN 1-85109-573-X. 
  • Gardiner, Robert; Chesneau, Roger (1980). Conway's All the World's Fighting Ships, 1922–1946. Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press. ISBN 0-87021-913-8. 
  • Garzke, William H.; Dulin, Robert O. (1985). Battleships: Axis and Neutral Battleships in World War II. Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press. ISBN 978-0-87021-101-0. 
  • Greger, Rene (1964). "German Seaplane and Aircraft Carriers in Both World Wars". Toledo, Ohio: Naval Records Club, Inc.. pp. 87–91. 
  • Gröner, Erich (1990). German Warships: 1815–1945. Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press. ISBN 0-87021-790-9. 
  • Shirokorad, Alexander (2004) (in Russian). Флот, который уничтожил Хрущёв (Flot, kotoryi unichtozhil Khruschev. AST publishers. ISBN 5-9602-0027-9. 


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