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The list of shipwrecks in August 1914 includes some ships sunk, foundered, grounded, or otherwise lost during August 1914

August 1914
Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun
Unknown date 1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31

3 August[]

5 August[]

6 August[]

7 August[]

8 August[]

  • Tysla ( Norway): World War I: The vessel struck a mine and sank in either the Baltic Sea or the North Sea.[6]

9 August[]

12 August[]

14 August[]

  • Glenfarg ( United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland): The cargo ship struck a rock and sank off Shirose, Japan. Her crew were rescued by Yawata Maru ( Japan).[8]

15 August[]

16 August[]

18 August[]

  • Bowes Castle ( United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland): The cargo ship was captured and scuttled in the Atlantic Ocean 350 nautical miles (650 km) north by west of Cape Orange, Brazil by SMS Karlsruhe ( Kaiserliche Marine).[3][4][10]

22 August[]

  • Alice H. ( Netherlands): World War I: The cargo ship struck a mine and sank in the Baltic Sea off the Kõpu Lighthouse, Estonia.[12]
  • Capricornus ( United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland): World War I: The trawler was scuttled in the North Sea 85 nautical miles (157 km) east by north of Spurn Point, Yorkshire by a Kaiserliche Marine torpedo boat. Her crew were taken as prisoners of war.[5]
  • Chr. Broberg ( Denmark): World War I: The cargo ship struck a mine and sank in the North Sea.[6][12]
  • Houtdik ( Netherlands): World War I: The cargo ship struck a mine and sank in the Baltic Sea off the Kõpu Lighthouse.[12]
  • Marnay ( United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland): World War I: The trawler was scuttled in the North Sea 85 nautical miles (157 km) east by north of Spurn Point by a Kaiserliche Marine torpedo boat. Her crew were taken as prisoners of war.[5]
  • Maryland ( Denmark): World War I: The cargo ship struck a mine and sank in the North Sea. Her crew were rescued.[12]
  • Skirbeck ( United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland): World War I: The trawler was shelled and sunk in the North Sea by a Kaiserliche Marine cruiser. Her crew were taken as prisoners of war.[5]
  • Walrus ( United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland): World War I: The trawler was shelled and sunk in the North Sea by a Kaiserliche Marine cruiser. Her crew were taken as prisoners of war.[5]
  • Wigtoft ( United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland): World War I: The trawler was shelled and sunk in the North Sea by a Kaiserliche Marine cruiser. Her crew were taken as prisoners of war.[5]

23 August[]

24 August[]

  • Walton ( United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland): The tug sank in the Manchester Ship Canal.[13]

25 August[]

  • Kesteven ( United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland): World War I: The trawler was scuttled in the North Sea 69 nautical miles (128 km) east north east of the Inner Dowsing Lightship ( United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland) by a Kaiserliche Marine torpedo boat. Her crew were taken as prisoners of war.[5]
  • Lindsey ( United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland): World War I: The trawler was scuttled in the North Sea 70 nautical miles (130 km) east north east of the Inner Dowsing Lightship ( United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland) by a Kaiserliche Marine torpedo boat. Her crew were taken as prisoners of war.[5]
  • Porpoise ( United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland): World War I: The trawler was scuttled in the North Sea 70 nautical miles (130 km) east north east of the Inner Dowsing Lightship ( United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland) by a Kaiserliche Marine torpedo boat. Her crew were taken as prisoners of war.[5]

26 August[]

  • Admiral Sampson ( United States): The cargo ship collided with Princess Victoria ( United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland) and sank in Puget Sound off Point No Point, Washington.[14]
  • Holmwood ( United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland): World War I: The cargo ship was captured and sunk in the Atlantic Ocean 180 nautical miles (330 km) east of Pernambuco, Brazil by SMS Dresden ( Kaiserliche Marine).[10]
  • Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse ( Germany): World War I: Battle of Río de Oro: The ocean liner was scuttled off Rio de Oro, Spanish Sahara following a battle with HMS Highflyer ( Royal Navy)

SMS Magdeburg

27 August[]

  • Barley Rig ( United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland): World War I: The drifter struck a mine and sank in the North Sea with the loss of five of her nine crew. The survivors were rescued by the trawler St. Clair ( United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland).[5][6]
  • HMT Crathie ( Royal Navy): World War I: The naval trawler struck a mine and sank in the North Sea 30 nautical miles (56 km) off the mouth of the River Tyne.[16][17]
  • Ena ( Norway): World War I: The cargo ship struck a mine and sank in the North Sea 30 nautical miles (56 km) off Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumberland, United Kingdom. Her crew were rescued by a Royal Navy torpedo boat.[15]
  • Gaea ( Denmark): The three-masted schooner struck a mine and sank in the North Sea with the loss of three of her six crew.[6]
  • Gottfried ( Norway): World War I: The cargo ship struck a mine and sank in the North Sea 30 nautical miles (56 km) off Newcastle-upon-Tyne.[15]
  • HMT Thomas W. Irvin ( Royal Navy): World War I: the naval trawler struck a mine and sank with the loss of three of her twelve crew.[18]

28 August[]

Mainz

29 August[]

  • Dargai ( United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland): The cargo ship ran aground on the English Bank, in the Atlantic Ocean off Montevideo, Uruguay and was wrecked. Her crew were rescued.[20]

30 August[]

  • Rion ( United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland): The tanker was run in to by Serrana ( United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland) and seriously damaged in the English Channel 9 nautical miles (17 km) south south west of Newhaven, East Sussex. She was consequently beached 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) west of Newhaven.[20][21]

31 August[]

  • Floriston ( United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland): The cargo ship struck an iceberg in the Atlantic Ocean and was beached at Point Riche, Newfoundland.[21]
  • Strathroy ( United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland): World War I: The cargo ship was scuttled in the Atlantic Ocean 100 nautical miles (190 km) north north east of Cape São Roque, Brazil by SMS Karlsruhe ( Kaiserliche Marine).[3]

Unknown date[]

  • Prince Albert ( Canada): The cargo ship was wrecked on the Butterworth Rocks, South Dundas Island, British Columbia. She was later salvaged, repaired and converted to a tug, re-entering service as J R Morgan.[22]

References[]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 "Major Warships Sunk in World War 1 1914". World War I. http://www.worldwar1.co.uk/sunk14.htm. Retrieved 21 February 2013. 
  2. "San Wilfrido (1)". Helderline. http://www.helderline.nl/tanker/1157/san+wilfrido+%281%29/. Retrieved 20 January 2013. 
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 "BRITISH MERCHANT SHIPS LOST to ENEMY ACTION Part 1 of 3 - Years 1914, 1915, 1916 in date order". Naval History. http://www.naval-history.net/WW1LossesBrMS1914-16.htm. Retrieved 20 January 2013. 
  4. 4.0 4.1 "Error: no |title= specified when using {{Cite web}}". 17 October 1914. 
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6 5.7 5.8 5.9 "BRITISH FISHING VESSELS LOST to ENEMY ACTION Part 1 of 2 - Years 1914, 1915, 1916 in date order". Naval History. http://www.naval-history.net/WW1LossesBrFV1914-16.htm. Retrieved 27 January 2013. 
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 "Error: no |title= specified when using {{Cite web}}". 29 August 1914. 
  7. "U 13". Uboat.net. http://www.uboat.net/wwi/boats/index.html?boat=13. Retrieved 24 September 2012. 
  8. 8.0 8.1 "Error: no |title= specified when using {{Cite web}}". 17 August 1914. 
  9. "Error: no |title= specified when using {{Cite web}}". 24 August 1914. 
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 "Error: no |title= specified when using {{Cite web}}". 9 January 1915. 
  11. 11.0 11.1 "Error: no |title= specified when using {{Cite web}}". 6 September 1914. 
  12. 12.0 12.1 12.2 12.3 "Error: no |title= specified when using {{Cite web}}". 24 August 1914. 
  13. "Error: no |title= specified when using {{Cite web}}". 26 August 1914. 
  14. "Error: no |title= specified when using {{Cite web}}". 28 August 1914. 
  15. 15.0 15.1 15.2 "Error: no |title= specified when using {{Cite web}}". 28 August 1914. 
  16. "BRITISH NAVAL VESSELS LOST AT SEA Part 1 of 2 - Abadol (oiler) to Lynx (destroyer)". Naval History. http://www.naval-history.net/WW1LossesBrRNA-L.htm. Retrieved 2 February 2013. 
  17. "HMS CRATHIE". English Heritage. http://www.pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=1002310. Retrieved 4 February 2013. 
  18. "Drifters and Trawlers in RN Service)". GWPDA. http://www.gwpda.org/naval/rntrawlr.htm. Retrieved 19 February 2013. 
  19. "Error: no |title= specified when using {{Cite web}}". 25 September 1914. 
  20. 20.0 20.1 "Error: no |title= specified when using {{Cite web}}". 31 August 1914. 
  21. 21.0 21.1 "Error: no |title= specified when using {{Cite web}}". 1 September 1914. 
  22. Heaton, K E (8 July 2004). "Shipwrecks in British Columbia's Waters". http://www.harlowmarine.com/app/newsletter/view_article/19,2.html. Retrieved 21 April 2011. 
Ship events in 1914
Ship launches: 1909 1910 1911 1912 1913 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919
Ship commissionings: 1909 1910 1911 1912 1913 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919
Ship decommissionings: 1909 1910 1911 1912 1913 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919
Shipwrecks: 1909 1910 1911 1912 1913 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919

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