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Although they are best known for their often heavy-handed attitude towards cases of [[Conscientious Objection]], most of the tribunals' work dealt with domestic and business matters. Men could apply on the grounds of their doing work of national importance, business or domestic hardship, medical unfitness, and [[conscientious objection]]. Only around two per cent of applicants were conscientious objectors.<ref>Adrian Gregory, 'Military Service Tribunals: civil society in action', in Jose Harris, ''Civil Society in British History'' (Oxford: 2003), pp. 177-191.</ref> The image of the tribunals at the time was that they were soft on these cases and harsh on those relating to domestic hardship;{{Unreferenced}} after the war conscience cases became more prominent and tribunals are known for their (genuinely) harsh treatment of objectors.
 
Although they are best known for their often heavy-handed attitude towards cases of [[Conscientious Objection]], most of the tribunals' work dealt with domestic and business matters. Men could apply on the grounds of their doing work of national importance, business or domestic hardship, medical unfitness, and [[conscientious objection]]. Only around two per cent of applicants were conscientious objectors.<ref>Adrian Gregory, 'Military Service Tribunals: civil society in action', in Jose Harris, ''Civil Society in British History'' (Oxford: 2003), pp. 177-191.</ref> The image of the tribunals at the time was that they were soft on these cases and harsh on those relating to domestic hardship;{{Unreferenced}} after the war conscience cases became more prominent and tribunals are known for their (genuinely) harsh treatment of objectors.
   
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A very large number of men applied: by the end of June 1916, 748,587 men had applied to tribunals.<ref>[[James Edward Edmonds|J.E. Edmonds]], ''Military Operations: France and Belgium: 1916'', vol. i (London: 1932), p152.</ref> Over the same period around 770,000 men [[Monthly recruiting figures for the British Army in the First World War|joined the army]]. Most men were given some kind of exemption, usually temporary (between a few weeks and six months) or conditional on their situation at work or home remaining serious enough to warrant their retention at home. In October 1.12 million men nationally held tribunal exemption or had cases pending,<ref>The National Archives, CAB 17/158, [[Derby scheme]]: Statement of the War Committee, 24/10/1916</ref> by May 1917 this had fallen to 780,000 exempt and 110,000 pending. At this point there were also 1.8 million men with exemptions granted by the government (for example, those working in war industries); combined these exemptions covered more men than were serving overseas with the British Army.<ref>''Statistics of the Military Effort of the British Empire during the Great War. 1914-1920'' (London: 1922).</ref>
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A very large number of men applied: by the end of June 1916, 748,587 men had applied to tribunals.<ref>[[James Edward Edmonds|J.E. Edmonds]], ''Military Operations: France and Belgium: 1916'', vol. i (London: 1932), p152.</ref> Over the same period around 770,000 men [[Monthly recruiting figures for the British Army in the First World War|joined the army]]. Most men were given some kind of exemption, usually temporary (between a few weeks and six months) or conditional on their situation at work or home remaining serious enough to warrant their retention at home. In October 1.12 million men nationally held tribunal exemption or had cases pending,<ref>[[The National Archives (United Kingdom)|The National Archives]], CAB 17/158, [[Derby scheme]]: Statement of the War Committee, 24/10/1916</ref> by May 1917 this had fallen to 780,000 exempt and 110,000 pending. At this point there were also 1.8 million men with exemptions granted by the government (for example, those working in war industries); combined these exemptions covered more men than were serving overseas with the British Army.<ref>''Statistics of the Military Effort of the British Empire during the Great War. 1914-1920'' (London: 1922).</ref>
   
 
==References==
 
==References==

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