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==History==
 
==History==
In 1508, [[Imagawa Ujichika]], ruler of Suruga and [[Totomi Province]]s, ordered his vassal Suganuma Motonari to build a castle in [[Minamishitara District, Aichi|Shitara County]], Mikawa Province to guard the western approaches to his domains.
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In 1508, [[Imagawa Ujichika]], ruler of [[Suruga Province|Suruga]] and [[Totomi Province]]s, ordered his vassal Suganuma Motonari to build a castle in [[Minamishitara District, Aichi|Shitara County]], [[Mikawa Province]] to guard the western approaches to his domains.
   
 
The castle came under the control of [[Tokugawa Ieyasu]] in 1573, who placed former Takeda vassal [[Okudaira Nobumasa]] in control. Following skirmishes with the increasingly bellicose [[Takeda clan]] to the north, the castle’s defenses were strengthened. The Takeda invaded Mikawa Province in force in 1575, and laid siege to the castle. In the subsequent Battle of Nagashino, the combined forces of [[Tokugawa Ieyasu]] and [[Oda Nobunaga]] brought a total force of 38,000 men to relieve the siege on the castle by Takeda Katsuyori. Of Takeda's original 15,000 besiegers, only 12,000 faced the Oda-Tokugawa army in this battle. Seeking to protect his [[arquebus]]iers from the Takeda cavalry, Nobunaga built a number of wooden stockades, behind which his gunners attacked in volleys. By mid-afternoon on the day of the battle, the Takeda broke and fled, after losing a great number of men, including eight the famous '[[Twenty-Four Generals of Takeda Shingen|Twenty-Four Generals]]' Katsuyori had inherited from [[Takeda Shingen]]. This use of gunfire was a turning point in the history of [[samurai]] warfare. After the battle, the castle was allowed to fall into ruin.
 
The castle came under the control of [[Tokugawa Ieyasu]] in 1573, who placed former Takeda vassal [[Okudaira Nobumasa]] in control. Following skirmishes with the increasingly bellicose [[Takeda clan]] to the north, the castle’s defenses were strengthened. The Takeda invaded Mikawa Province in force in 1575, and laid siege to the castle. In the subsequent Battle of Nagashino, the combined forces of [[Tokugawa Ieyasu]] and [[Oda Nobunaga]] brought a total force of 38,000 men to relieve the siege on the castle by Takeda Katsuyori. Of Takeda's original 15,000 besiegers, only 12,000 faced the Oda-Tokugawa army in this battle. Seeking to protect his [[arquebus]]iers from the Takeda cavalry, Nobunaga built a number of wooden stockades, behind which his gunners attacked in volleys. By mid-afternoon on the day of the battle, the Takeda broke and fled, after losing a great number of men, including eight the famous '[[Twenty-Four Generals of Takeda Shingen|Twenty-Four Generals]]' Katsuyori had inherited from [[Takeda Shingen]]. This use of gunfire was a turning point in the history of [[samurai]] warfare. After the battle, the castle was allowed to fall into ruin.

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