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No. 84 Squadron RAAF
Kitthawks 84 Sqn RAAF in flight over Thursday Island 1943.jpg
No. 84 Squadron aircraft over Horn Island in 1943
Active 5 February 1943 – 29 January 1946
Country  Australia
Branch Royal Australian Air Force
Role Fighter
Engagements World War II
Aircraft flown
Fighter CAC Boomerang
P-40 Kittyhawk
CAC Mustang

No. 84 Squadron was a Royal Australian Air Force fighter squadron of World War II.

History[]

No. 84 Squadron was formed at RAAF Base Richmond on 5 February 1943 and was the first RAAF Squadron to be equipped with the Australian-designed Boomerang fighter. In April 1943 No. 84 Squadron was deployed to Horn Island, Queensland in the Torres Strait where it was responsible for the air defence of Horn Island and Merauke in New Guinea alongside No. 86 Squadron.

Due to the limited Japanese presence in this area, this duty was largely uneventful, though Boomerangs from No. 84 Squadron did attempt to intercept Japanese aircraft on a small number of occasions. These attempts were unsuccessful, however, at least partially due to the poor performance of the Boomerang. In light of the Boomerang's shortcomings as a fighter, No. 84 Squadron was issued with superior P-40 Kittyhawk aircraft in September 1943, making the Squadron both the first RAAF unit to be issued with the Boomerang and the first to replace its Boomerangs with other fighter aircraft. After transitioning to the Kittyhawk, No. 84 Squadron performed ground attack missions in New Guinea.

84 Sqn P-51K in 1945.

In May 1944, No. 84 Squadron returned to mainland Australia and was briefly reduced to cadre status. The Squadron returned to operational status in June and provided training support for Army units in Northern Queensland. No. 84 Squadron was re-equipped with P-51D Mustang aircraft in May 1945, though the war ended before the Squadron had converted to these new aircraft. No 84 Squadron was disbanded at RAAF Base Townsville on 29 January 1946.

Aircraft operated[]

References[]

  • RAAF Museum 84 Squadron
  • Steve Eather (1995) Flying Squadrons of the Australian Defence Force. Aerospace Publications.

External links[]


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