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Peter R. Mansoor
Born February 28, 1960(1960-02-28) (age 61)
Allegiance United States
Service/branch United States Army
Years of service 1982-2008
Rank Colonel
Commands held 1st Brigade, 1st Armored Division (2003-2005)
Battles/wars Iraq War
Other work Military historian

Peter R. Mansoor (born February 28, 1960) is a retired United States Army officer and a military historian. He is known primarily as the executive officer to General David Petraeus during the Iraq War, particularly the Iraq War troop surge of 2007. He is currently an associate professor at the Ohio State University, where he holds the Raymond E. Mason Chair, Jr. of Military History. Mansoor has published two memoirs of his service in Iraq. Baghdad at Sunrise: A Brigade Commander’s War in Iraq (2008) details his service as commander of the 1st Brigade, 1st Armored Division from 2003 to 2005. Surge: My Journey with General David Petraeus and the Remaking of the Iraq War (2013) focuses on his service under Petraeus. He is also the author of The GI Offensive in Europe: The Triumph of American Infantry Divisions, 1941-1945 (1999), which received the Society for Military History distinguished book award in 2000.[1]

Education[]

Mansoor earned his B.S. at the United States Military Academy in 1982 (graduating first in his class), his M.A. in History at The Ohio State University in 1992, and his Ph.D. in History at The Ohio State University in 1995. He earned his M.S.S. in Strategic Studies at the United States Army War College in 2003.[2]

Career[]

Military[]

Commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in May 1982, Mansoor served in a variety of command and staff assignments, including postings with the 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment at Fort Bliss, Texas; the 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment in Bad Hersfeld and Fulda, Germany. He commanded the 1st Squadron, 10th Cavalry and served as operations officer (G-3) of the 4th Infantry Division (Mechanized) at Fort Hood, Texas. In 1993-1995 he was a military history instructor at the U.S. Military Academy. He later served on the Joint Staff as the special assistant to the Director for Strategic Plans and Policy in the United States Department of Defense, during a period that included the Bosnian peace support operation, Operation Desert Fox, and the Kosovo War. From 2003 to 2005 Mansoor commanded the 1st Brigade, 1st Armored Division, which was deployed in Iraq from July 2003 to July 2004.[3]

In 2005 Mansoor became a senior military fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York.[4] He then served as the founding director of the U.S. Army/Marine Corps Counterinsurgency Center at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. There he helped to edit FM 3-24 Counterinsurgency, published in 2006, which was used to reshape the conduct of the Iraq War. In the fall of 2006 he served on the so-called "Council of Colonels," a task force of senior officers created by the Joint Chiefs of Staff that reexamined the strategy for the war in Iraq.[5] During its deliberations, Mansoor advocated sending additional troops to Iraq as part of the strategy eventually known as "the Surge," albeit at a lower strength level than the option preferred by then-Colonel H. R. McMaster, another member of the council. Mansoor termed his strategy preference the "Go Long" option.[6] At the time he formed a minority among the Council of Colonels, most of whom opposed the idea of a troop surge.[7]

Mansoor's military career culminated with his assignment as the executive officer to General David Petraeus, Commanding General of Multi-National Force – Iraq, during the period of the Surge in 2007–2008. Military analyst Tom Ricks, author of The Gamble (2009), describes Mansoor as one of the two "most important advisers to Petraeus."[8] Mansoor retired with the rank of colonel in July 2008.[2]

Academic[]

As a captain, Mansoor served from 1993 to 1995 as a military history instructor at the U.S. Military Academy. In September 2008 Mansoor assumed his present position as holder of the Raymond E. Mason, Jr., Chair of Military History. Mansoor's research interests include modern U.S. military history, World War II, the Iraq War, and counter-insurgency.[2]

References[]

  1. "SMH Book Awards". Society for Military History web site. http://www.smh-hq.org/awards/books.html. Retrieved 2014-03-02. 
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 "Peter R. Mansoor Faculty Profile". Department of History, The Ohio State University. http://history.osu.edu/directory/Mansoor1. Retrieved 2014-03-02. 
  3. Thomas E. Ricks, The Gamble: General David Petraeus and the American Military Adventure in Iraq, 2006-2008 (New York: The Penguin Press, 2009), 138.
  4. "Peter R. Mansoor, Council on Foreign Relations". Council on Foreign Relations web site. http://www.cfr.org/experts/world/colonel-peter-r-mansoor/b11404. Retrieved 2014-03-02. 
  5. Bob Woodward, The War Within: A Secret White House History, 2006-2008 (New York: Simon and Schuster, 2008), 152-153, 200, 203. Linda Robinson, 26-27 Tell Me How This Ends: General David Petraeus and the Search for a Way Out of Iraq (New York: PublicAffairs, 2008), 27-28.
  6. Linda Robinson, Tell Me How This Ends: General David Petraeus and the Search for a Way Out of Iraq (New York: PublicAffairs, 2008), 27-28.
  7. Thomas E. Ricks, The Gamble: General David Petraeus and the American Military Adventure in Iraq, 2006-2008 (New York: The Penguin Press, 2009), 102, 103-104.
  8. Thomas E. Ricks, The Gamble: General David Petraeus and the American Military Adventure in Iraq, 2006-2008 (New York: The Penguin Press, 2009), 137.

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