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RAF South Cerney
Duke of Gloucester Barracks

Ensign of the Royal Air ForceFlag of the British Army
IATA: none – ICAO: none
Summary
Owner Ministry of Defence
Operator Royal Air Force
British Army - Royal Logistics Corps
Location South Cerney, Gloucestershire
Built 1936/7
In use Royal Air Force 16 August 1937 - 1 July 1971
Royal Logistics Corps 1 July 1971-Present
Elevation AMSL 364 ft / 111 m
Coordinates 51°41′27″N 001°55′28″W / 51.69083°N 1.92444°W / 51.69083; -1.92444Coordinates: 51°41′27″N 001°55′28″W / 51.69083°N 1.92444°W / 51.69083; -1.92444
Map
Gloucestershire UK location map
Airplane silhouette.svg
Duke of Gloucester Barracks
Location in Gloucestershire
Runways
Direction Length Surface
ft m
01/19 2,925 892 Grass
09/27 3,225 983 Grass

RAF South Cerney is a former Royal Air Force station which is now known as the Duke of Gloucester Barracks and is home of 29 Postal Courier and Movement Regiment Royal Logistic Corps and the Joint Air Mounting Centre. It is located in the village of South Cerney near Cirencester in Gloucestershire, England.

Units located at Duke of Gloucester BarracksEdit

The Joint Air Mounting Centre (JAMC) is located 20 miles (32 km) away from RAF Brize Norton, the MOD's Air Port of Embarkation. The JAMC facilities mean that a Very High Readiness formation can mount and poise before deploying on operations or exercises. The JAMC can offer facilities such as an operations suite, briefing rooms and sufficient holding areas for men and equipment up to brigade size.[citation needed]

The JAMC also offers welfare, life support and accommodation facilities that complement those facilities available at RAF Brize Norton. Formed units from all 3 Services will report to the JAMC for processing, baggage checks, feeding and travel to RAF Brize Norton.[citation needed]

It has three very large hangars which are used for processing up to 1,500 'through troops' on operations and exercises, a process which can take anything up to 3 weeks.[1]

The Joint movements staff at the JAMC come predominantly from a 29 Regt RLC squadron, but the RLC personnel are also complimented by a small team of RAF Logistics (Mover) personnel; the Officer Commanding JAMC is an RAF Logistics officer.[citation needed]

No. 29 Postal Courier and Movement Regiment Royal Logistic Corps is also located at the barracks.[citation needed]

HistoryEdit

During the Second World War a number of training units were posted to the airfield:[2]

RunwaysEdit

The site has two short runways that are regularly used by two commercial freefall parachuting businesses.[3][4] The airfield is marked on aeronautical charts as a drop zone.[citation needed]

Today the barracks have good connections to the A419 and A417 trunk roads allowing easy access to the whole of the southern England, via the M4 and M5 Motorway.[4]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

External linksEdit


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