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|launch_platform=[[USS Norton Sound (AVM-1)]]
 
|launch_platform=[[USS Norton Sound (AVM-1)]]
 
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The '''Lark''' project was a high-priority, solid-fuel boosted, liquid-fueled rocket [[surface-to-air missile]] developed by the [[United States Navy]] to meet the [[kamikaze]] threat.<ref name=p&s>[[Whiz Kids (Department of Defense)|Peck, Merton J.]] & [[Frederic M. Scherer|Scherer, Frederic M.]] ''The Weapons Acquisition Process: An Economic Analysis'' (1962) Harvard Business School pp.232-233&659</ref> After ''Lark'' configuration was established by the [[Bureau of Aeronautics]] in January 1945 [[Fairchild Aircraft]] was given a contract to produce 100 missiles in March 1945. Fairchild used radio command guidance with a [[semi-active radar homing]] AN/DPN-7. A backup contract for another 100 missiles was given to Convair in June 1945. Convair used [[beam riding]] guidance with AN/APN-23 [[active radar homing]].<ref name=par>{{cite web|url=http://www.designation-systems.net/dusrm/app1/sam-n-2.html|title=SAM-N-2/SAM-N-4|publisher=Andreas Parsch|accessdate=2013-04-17}}</ref> Neither version was successful. Six of the Convair airframes were given to [[Raytheon]] to explore use of velocity-gated [[Continuous-wave radar|continuous wave]] doppler radar for guided missile target seekers, while most other United States investigators used range-gated pulse [[radar]]. One of these Raytheon guidance systems in a Convair airframe scored the first successful United States surface-to-air missile interception of a flying target in January 1950.<ref name=p&s/>
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The '''Lark''' project was a high-priority, solid-fuel [[Booster (rocketry)|boosted]], liquid-fueled rocket [[surface-to-air missile]] developed by the [[United States Navy]] to meet the [[kamikaze]] threat.<ref name=p&s>[[Whiz Kids (Department of Defense)|Peck, Merton J.]] & [[Frederic M. Scherer|Scherer, Frederic M.]] ''The Weapons Acquisition Process: An Economic Analysis'' (1962) Harvard Business School pp.232-233&659</ref> After ''Lark'' configuration was established by the [[Bureau of Aeronautics]] in January 1945 [[Fairchild Aircraft]] was given a contract to produce 100 missiles in March 1945. Fairchild used radio command guidance with a [[semi-active radar homing]] AN/DPN-7. A backup contract for another 100 missiles was given to Convair in June 1945. Convair used [[beam riding]] guidance with AN/APN-23 [[active radar homing]].<ref name=par>{{cite web|url=http://www.designation-systems.net/dusrm/app1/sam-n-2.html|title=SAM-N-2/SAM-N-4|publisher=Andreas Parsch|accessdate=2013-04-17}}</ref> Neither version was successful. Six of the Convair airframes were given to [[Raytheon]] to explore use of velocity-gated [[Continuous-wave radar|continuous wave]] doppler radar for guided missile target seekers, while most other United States investigators used range-gated pulse [[radar]]. One of these Raytheon guidance systems in a Convair airframe scored the first successful United States surface-to-air missile interception of a flying target in January 1950.<ref name=p&s/>
   
 
==Early guided missile development==
 
==Early guided missile development==

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