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SM U-135
SM U 135 at sea.jpg
SM U-135 at sea, 1917
Career (German Empire)
Name: SM U-135
Ordered: 27 May 1916[1]
Builder: Kaiserliche Werft Danzig[1]
Laid down: 4 November 1916[1]
Launched: 8 September 1917[1]
Commissioned: 20 June 1918[1]
Fate: Surrendered, 20 November 1918
Scuttled in 1921[1]
General characteristics
Type: German Type Mittel U submarine
Displacement: 808 long tons (821 t) surfaced
946 long tons (961 t) submerged
1,160 long tons (1,179 t) total
Length: 70.6 m (231 ft 8 in) o/a
55.5 m (182 ft 1 in) pressure hull
Beam: 6.3 m (20 ft 8 in) o/a
4.15 m (13 ft 7 in) pressure hull
Draught: 4.02 m (13 ft 2 in)
Propulsion: 2,400 hp (1,790 kW) diesel engines
1,200 hp (895 kW) electric motors
Speed: 16.8 knots (19.3 mph; 31.1 km/h) surfaced
9.1 knots (10.5 mph; 16.9 km/h) submerged
Range: 11,220 nmi (20,780 km) surfaced
56 nmi (104 km) submerged
Complement: 39 men
Armament: • 6 × torpedo tubes (4 bow, 2 stern)
• 16 × torpedoes
• 1 × 150 mm (5.9 in) deck gun with 220 rounds
• 1 × 88 mm (3.5 in) deck gun

SM U-135 was a German Type Mittel U U-boat of the Imperial German Navy during World War I. Built at the Kaiserliche Werft Danzig, the U-boat was laid down on 4 November 1916, launched on 8 September 1917 and commissioned 20 June 1918.

In November 1918, U-135 was ordered to help put down the German Navy mutiny at Wilhelmshaven. Along with the 4th Torpedo Boat Half-Flotilla, U-135 ended the mutiny aboard two German battleships SMS Thüringen and SMS Helgoland by threatening to torpedo the ships.

The U-135 was seen by later submarine designers as an excellent design. She was an inspiration for V-boats USS Cachalot (SS-170) and USS Cuttlefish (SS-171).

Prior to the U-135 being scuttled by the Royal Navy in the early 1920s, her engines and various other items of equipment were stripped by a team of 25 students led by Technical Officer Richard Finney [1888-1953] under the auspices of J. F. Driver from the then Loughborough College. This equipment was reassembled initially in a wooden hut in Packe Street, Loughborough, and later in a purpose built generating station opened in 1937. They were finally taken out of use, and replaced, in 1949.[2]

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 "U-135 - U-boats of World War I". uboat.net. http://www.uboat.net/wwi/boats/index.html?boat=135. Retrieved 29 September 2010. 
  2. Leonard Cantor, Loughborough University of Technology: Past and Present, 1990, LUT, p.50.

Coordinates: 49°35′N 4°33′W / 49.583°N 4.55°W / 49.583; -4.55

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