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SM U-90
Career (German Empire)
Name: U-90
Ordered: 23 June 1915
Builder: Kaiserliche Werft Danzig
Yard number: Werk 34
Laid down: 29 December 1915
Launched: 12 January 1917
Commissioned: 2 August 1917
Fate: Surrendered 20 November 1918; broken up 1919–1920
General characteristics
Class & type: German Type U 87 submarine
Displacement: 808 tons (surfaced)
946 tons (submerged)
1160 tons (total)
Length: 70.60 m (231 ft 8 in) (overall)
55.55 m (182 ft 3 in) (pressure hull)
Beam: 6.30 m (20 ft 8 in) (overall)
4.15 m (13 ft 7 in) (pressure hull)
Draft: 4.02 m (13 ft 2 in)
Propulsion: 2,400 hp (1,800 kW) (surfaced)
1,200 hp (890 kW) (submerged)
Speed: 16.8 knots (31.1 km/h) (surfaced)
9.1 knots (16.9 km/h) (submerged)
Range: 11,220 nmi (20,780 km) (surfaced) 56 nmi (104 km) (submerged)
Complement: 39 men
Armament: 16 torpedoes (4/2 in bow/stern tubes)
105 mm (4.1 in) deck gun with 220 rounds
88 mm (3.5 in) deck gun

SM U-90 was a Type U 87 u-boat of the Imperial German Navy during World War I.[1]

The commander, Walter Remy, was noted for making regular stops at the very remote UK island of North Rona for provisions, including fresh mutton.

On 31 May 1918, U-90 torpedoed and sank USS President Lincoln. The ship was a former Hamburg America Line steamer of the same name seized by the United States and employed as a troop transport. From the U.S. Navy crew that abandoned the sinking vessel, U-90 captured Lieutenant Edouard Izac, eventually taking him to Germany.

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