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SM UC-17
Career (German Empire)
Name: UC-17
Ordered: 29 August 1915[1]
Builder: Blohm & Voss, Hamburg[2]
Yard number: 267[1]
Launched: 29 February 1916[1]
Commissioned: 21 July 1916[1]
Fate: surrendered, November 1918; broken up, 1919–20[1]
General characteristics
Class & type: German Type UC II submarine
Displacement: 417 t (460 short tons), surfaced[2]
493 t (543 short tons), submerged
Length: 161 ft 11 in (49.35 m)[2]
Beam: 17 ft 4 in (5.28 m)[2]
Draft: 12 ft 2 in (4 m)[3]
Propulsion: 2 × propeller shafts
2 × 6-cylinder, 4-stroke diesel engines, 500 bhp (370 kW)[3]
2 × electric motors, 460 shp (340 kW)[3]
Speed: 11.6 knots (21.5 km/h), surfaced[2]
7.0 knots (13.0 km/h), submerged
Endurance: 9,430 nautical miles @ 7 knots, surfaced[3]
(17,460 km @ 13 km/h)
55 nautical miles @ 4 knots, submerged[3]
(102 km @ 7.4 km/h)
Test depth: 50 m (160 ft)[3]
Complement: 26[3]
Armament: 6 × 100 cm (39.4 in) mine tubes[3]
18 × UC 200 mines
3 × 50 cm (19.7 in) torpedo tubes (2 bow/external; one stern)
7 × torpedoes
1 × 8.8 cm (3.46 in) KL/30 deck gun[2]
Notes: 35-second diving time[2]

SM UC-17 was a German Type UC II minelaying submarine or U-boat in the Imperial German Navy in World War I. She was ordered on 29 August 1915 and launched on 29 February 1916. She was commissioned into the Imperial German Navy on 21 July 1916 as SM UC-17.[Note 1]

In 21 patrols UC-17 was credited with sinking 97 ships by either torpedo or laying mines. They included the Royal Fleet Auxiliary munitions ship RFA Lady Cory-Wright, which she torpedoed and sank in the English Channel on 26 March 1918.

UC-17 was surrendered on 26 November 1918 and broken up at Preston in 1919–20.[1]

Notes[edit | edit source]

  1. "SM" stands for Seiner Majestäts (English: His Majesty's) and combined with the U for Unterseeboot translates as "His Majesty's Submarine".

References[edit | edit source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 Helgason, Guðmundur (1995-2009). "WWI U-boats: UC-17". U-Boat War in World War I. Uboat.net. http://uboat.net/wwi/boats/index.html?boat=UC+17. Retrieved 22 February 2009. 
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 Tarrant, p. 173
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 Gardiner, p. 182

References[edit | edit source]


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