Military Wiki
Advertisement
Siege of Thionville
Part of the French Revolutionary Wars
Thionville-siège.jpg
Print of the 1792 siege of Thionville.
Date24 August – 16 October 1792
LocationThionville, France
Result French victory
Belligerents
 Kingdom of the French (until 21 September)
 French First Republic
Habsburg Monarchy Holy Roman Empire
Kingdom of France Armée des Émigrés
Commanders and leaders
Georges Félix de Wimpffen

Habsburg Monarchy Frederick Louis, Prince of Hohenlohe-Ingelfingen

Kingdom of France Prince de Bourbon Charles Eugène Gabriel de La Croix, Marquis de Castries
Strength
3,000 – 4,000 French 20,000 Austrians
16,000 French émigrés
Casualties and losses
Not known; very slight ca 10 killed and wounded

The Siege of Thionville (French: Siège de Thionville) was a conflict during the War of the First Coalition. It began at Thionville on 24 August 1792.

History[]

Background[]

The Siege of Thionville was a conflict during the War of the First Coalition. It began at Thionville on 24 August 1792. A coalition force of 20,000 Austrians and 16,000 French Royalist troops under Frederick Louis, Prince of Hohenlohe-Ingelfingen failed to take the town, commanded by Georges Félix de Wimpffen, and raised the siege on 16 October. One of the French royalist troops was François-René de Chateaubriand, who was wounded in the battle.[1] In the aftermath of the siege the National Convention declared that Thionville had "deserved well of the fatherland" - it named Place de Thionville and Rue de Thionville in Paris after the victory.

Order of Battle[]

The order of battle of forces involved in the siege were:

Republicans[]

  • Garrison of Thionville, commanded by Georges Félix de Wimpffen[2][3][Note 1]
    • 103rd Regiment of Line Infantry (103éme Régiment d'Infanterie de Ligne) — 2 battalions
    • Depots of the 2nd, 6th, 58th Infantry Regiments, 12th Mounted Chasseurs, and 13th Dragoon Regiments
    • Converged Grenadier Battalion
    • 1er Bataillon de Garde Nationale des Ardennes[4]
    • 1er Bataillon de Garde Nationale de la Creuse[5]
    • 2éme Bataillon de Garde Nationale de Saine-et-Marne
    • 3éme Bataillon de Garde Nationale de la Moselle
    • 4éme Bataillon de Garde Nationale de la Meurthe
    • 2 Artillery Companies

Austrian-Royalist Forces[]

  • Austrian Forces, commanded by Feldzeugmeister Friedrich Wilhelm, Prince of Hohenlohe-Kirchberg[3][Note 2]
    • Waldeck Corps, commanded by Lieutenant General Christian August, Prince of Waldeck and Pyrmont[6]
      • Hussar Regiment Wurmser Nr.30 (4 squadrons)
      • Light Horse Regiment Kinsky Nr.7 (4 squadrons)
      • Warasdiner Grenzer Infantry Regiment (1 battalion)
      • Infantry Regiment Mittrowsky Nr.40 (2 battalions)
    • d'Alton Corps, commanded by Lieutenant General Jacob, Count d'Alton
      • Hussar Regiment Wurmser Nr.30 (2 squadrons)
      • Light Cavalry Regiment Kinsky Nr.7 (2 squadrons)
      • Infantry Regiment Schröder Nr.7 (2 battalions)
      • Infantry Regiment d'Alton Nr.15 (1 battalion)
      • Infantry Regimentde Vins Nr.37 (1 battalion)
      • Infantry Regiment Franz Kinsky Nr.47 (2 battalion)
      • Infantry Regiment Joseph Colloredo Nr.57 (1 battalion)
    • Reserve Artillery, commanded by Lieutenant General Olivier Remigius, Count of Wallis on Carrighmain
      • Hussar Regiment Wurmser Nr.30 (2 squadrons)
      • Dragoon Regiment Archduke Josef Nr.26 (6 squadrons)
      • Infantry Regiment Manfredini Nr.12 (2 battalions)
      • Infantry Regiment Stain Nr.50 (2 battalions)
      • 4 Howitzers
      • 4 12-pdr Guns
  • Émigré Corps, commanded by Prince de Bourbon Charles Eugène Gabriel de La Croix, Marquis de Castries (detached from the Armée de Condé)
    • Chasseurs Carabiniers (6 companies)
    • 2 1/2 squadrons of cavalry
    • Légion de la Normandie (7 companies)
    • 2 Companies of Advance Guard Infantry
    • Brigade Picardie (2 battalions)
    • Brigade d'Auxerrois (2 battalions)
    • Reserve
      • 6 Cavalry Squadrons
      • 9 Infantry Companies
      • 1 Company of Artillery from the Royal Artillerie (only fired a few shots)[6]

Footnotes[]

Notes

  1. Smith says, "103e RIdLI (2 bns); some National Guard battalions." (Smith, p. 25). After some looking around, these was the only Regular Army unit, however some depots and other units were in-fact involved.
  2. Smith states that in each Austrian corps/column/group, there were 2 divisional generals, but doesn't show which units are in each, therefore the units below are separate by their corps instead. It is entirely possible the corps were separated by type.

Citations

  1. Robert Leggewie, Anthologie de la littérature française, Tome II, troisième édition, p. 11.
  2. Smith Napoleonic Wars Data Book, p. 25.
  3. 3.0 3.1 George Nafziger, Garrison and Siege Forces Lille & Thionville, August–September 1792, United States Army Combined Arms Center. Retrieved 1 November 2020.
  4. "1er bataillon des Ardennes" (in fr-FR). 2017-02-21. https://revolutionsehrivolontaires.wordpress.com/1er-bataillon-des-ardennes/. 
  5. "1er bataillon de la Creuse" (in fr-FR). 2018-08-20. https://revolutionsehrivolontaires.wordpress.com/1er-bataillon-de-la-creuse/. 
  6. 6.0 6.1 Muret, pp. 76, 146.

References[]

  • Robert Leggewie, Anthologie de la Littérature Française, Tome II, Troisième Édition.
  • Digby Smith, The Greenhill Napoleonic Wars Data Book: Actions and Losses in Personnel, Colours, Standards, and Artillery, 1792–1815, 1998 Greenhill Books, London, United Kingdom. ISBN 1-85367-276-9.
  • Digby Smith, Napoleon's Regiments Battle Histories of the Regiments of the French Army, 1792–1815, 2000 Greenhill Books, London, United Kingdom. ISBN 1-85367-413-3.
  • Digby Smith & Jeremy Black, An Illustrated Encyclopedia of Uniforms of the Napoleonic Wars, 2015 Lorenz Books, London, United Kingdom. ISBN 978-0-7548-1571-6.

Coordinates: 49°21′32″N 6°10′09″E / 49.3589°N 6.1692°E / 49.3589; 6.1692

This page uses Creative Commons Licensed content from Wikipedia (view authors).
Advertisement