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S-62 / HH-52A Seaguard
HH-52A Seaguard with rescue basket 1960s.jpg
A U.S. Coast Guard HH-52A Seaguard using a rescue basket
Role SAR/utility helicopter
Manufacturer Sikorsky Aircraft
First flight 1959
Introduction 1961
Primary user United States Coast Guard
Number built 175

The Sikorsky S-62 was a single turbine engine, three-blade rotor amphibious helicopter originally developed as a commercial venture by the Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation of Stratford, Connecticut. It was used by the United States Coast Guard as the HH-52A Seaguard primarily for air-sea rescue, and now has been replaced by non-amphibious types such as the HH-65 Dolphin which rely on using a winch to retrieve passengers from a hover.

Design and developmentEdit

A number of S-62s were bought by the US Navy Bureau of Aeronautics for the US Coast Guard for use as a search and rescue helicopter. Initially designated HU2S-1G Seaguard, it was re-designated as the HH-52A Seaguard in 1962.

The HH-52A used a boat hulled shaped fuselage, smaller but similar to the US Navy's SH-3 (Sikorsky S-61), and was employed aboard the larger Coast Guard cutters and icebreakers. The S-62 used a single 1,250 hp (930 kW) General Electric T58-GE-8 turboshaft engine, the same powerplant used on the larger twin-engined SH-3; and a 1,050 hp T58-GE-6 derated to 670 hp, moving the same main and tail rotor as S-55 Model, in the prototype.

The turbine powered S-62 could carry more weight and fly faster than the H-19 (S-55). The aircraft was first conceived and designed to be amphibious so that flotation gear would not be required for over water flights, and rescues could be made by landing on the water. The fuselage is watertight for landings on water or snow. Two outrigger floats resist pitching and rolling on the water. Although the HH-52A looks very different from the Sikorsky H-19, it used many of the same components.

VariantsEdit

S62 proto LBG 6-1959

N880, S-62 Prototype (cn62001), Paris-Le Bourget (France), June 1959.

AC HH52 HU16 1

A Coast Guard Grumman HU-16E Albatross and a Sikorsky HH-52A Seaguard in March, 1964, probably at CG Air Station Mobile

S-62
Prototype. First flew on the 22nd of May 1958.
S-62A
Amphibious transport helicopter, powered by a General Electric CT58-110-1 turboshaft engine, with accommodation for up to 11 passengers. The S-62A was the first production version.
S-62B
One S-62 was fitted with the main rotor system of the S-58.
S-62C
Company designation of the HH-52A Seaguard.
S-62J
Produced under license in Japan by Mitsubishi.[1]
HU2S-1G
Original designation of the HH-52A Seaguard. Redesignated HH-52A in 1962.
HH-52A Seaguard
Search and rescue helicopter for the United States Coast Guard. 99 built including one transferred to Iceland.

OperatorsEdit

Flag of Iceland.svg Iceland
Flag of Japan.svg Japan
Flag of the Philippines.svg Philippines
Flag of Thailand.svg Thailand
United States

SurvivorsEdit

Hh-52a krj

HH-52A Seaguard 'USCG1355' at the National Museum of Naval Aviation in Pensacola FL

Hh52cockpitkrj

Cockpit of HH-52A Seaguard 'USCG1355' at the National Museum of Naval Aviation in Pensacola FL

United StatesEdit

N880
S-62 prototype , cn 62001, YoM 1958, ff 22-5-1958 - still in current FAA Register at March 31, 2011 to CARSON SERVICES Inc., Perkasie (PENNS.).
USCG 1355
On display at the National Naval Aviation Museum at NAS Pensacola, Florida[11]
USCG 1357
Dillingham Airport, HI
USCG 1370
On display at Freedom Park in Omaha, Nebraska
USCG 1378
At the USS Alabama Museum in Mobile, Alabama [12]
USCG 1383
American Helicopter Museum & Education Center, Westchester, PA [13]
USCG 1384
Gate guard at CGAS Elizabeth City, NC
USCG 1389
Delgado Community College, New Orleans LA
USCG 1394
Mid-Atlantic Air Museum, Reading PA [14]
USCG 1398
In a mechanics school in Pocahantas AR
USCG 1397
Amarillo College, FAR Part 147 Aviation Maintenance Technician School, Amarillo, TX
USCG 1415
Museum of Flight (Seattle) Restoration Facility, Everett, WA [15]
USCG 1416
Broward College Aviation school - North Perry Airport, Pembroke Pines, FL
USCG 1423
Cockpit section only at National Museum of Naval Aviation at NAS Pensacola, Florida
USCG 1428
On display at the New England Air Museum, Windsor Locks, CT [16]
USCG 1429
Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum - New York City
USCG 1450
On display at the Pima Air & Space Museum adjacent to Davis-Monthan AFB in Tucson, Arizona [17]
USCG 1455
On display at the Aviation Hall of Fame and Museum of New Jersey, Teterboro, NJ
USCG 1459
Sister to USCG 1394 above, both retired from the now closed USCG Air Station Chicago at NAS Glenview.
Was on display at the Museum of Science and Industry (Chicago), now is at the Naval Air Station Glenview Museum.
USCG 1462
On display at the Naval Air Station Wildwood Aviation Museum, Cape May County, NJ [18]

PhilippinesEdit

62018 (cn M62002)
On display at the Philippine Air Force Museum, Ninoy Aquino International Airport, Pasay City[19]

Specifications (HH-52A)Edit

HH-52 Line Drawng

Data from Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1969-70 [20]

General characteristics
  • Crew: 3
  • Length: 44 ft 6½ in (13.58 m)
  • Rotor diameter: 53 ft 0 in (16.16 m)
  • Height: 16 ft 0 in (4.88 m)
  • Disc area: 2,206 sq ft (205 m²)
  • Empty weight: 5,083 lb [21] (2,306 kg)
  • Useful load: 3,217 lb [21] (1,459 kg)
  • Max. takeoff weight: 8,300 lb [21] (3,764 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × General Electric T58-GE-8 turboshaft, 1250 shp derated to 730 shp (500 kW)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 95 knot (175km/h, 109 mph) at sea level
  • Cruise speed: 85 knot (158 km/h, 98 mph)
  • Range: 412 nmi (763 km, 474 mi)
  • Service ceiling: 11,200 ft (3,410 m)
  • Rate of climb: 1,080 ft/min (5.5 m/s)

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

Notes
  1. http://archive.is/o8ip
  2. "Occurrence # 71344". aviation-safety.net. http://aviation-safety.net/wikibase/wiki.php?id=71344. Retrieved 26-February-2013. 
  3. 3.0 3.1 "World Helicopter Market 1968 pg 53". http://www.flightglobal.com/pdfarchive/view/1968/1968%20-%201209.html. Retrieved 2013-02-25. 
  4. "JSDAF S-62". Demand media. http://www.airliners.net/photo/Japan---Air/Sikorsky-(Mitsubishi)-S-62J/0852731/L/&sid=af9a82c5d71e842eca6850665addcd2d. Retrieved 26-February-2013. 
  5. "Phil Air Force S-62". Demand media. http://www.airliners.net/photo/Philippines---Air/Sikorsky-(Mitsubishi)-S-62J/1645396/L/&sid=af9a82c5d71e842eca6850665addcd2d. Retrieved 26-February-2013. 
  6. "World Helicopter Market 1968 pg. 54". flightglobal.com. http://www.flightglobal.com/pdfarchive/view/1968/1968%20-%201210.html. Retrieved 26-February-2013. 
  7. "World Helicopter Market 1968 pg. 55". flightglobal.com. http://www.flightglobal.com/pdfarchive/view/1968/1968%20-%201211.html. Retrieved 26-February-2013. 
  8. "Sikorsky HH-52A Seaguard". uscg.mil. http://www.uscg.mil/history/webaircraft/SikorskyHH52A.pdf. Retrieved 24-February-2013. 
  9. "S-62 (HH-52A, S-62A, S-62B, S-62C)". sikorskyarchives.com. http://www.sikorskyarchives.com/S-62%20HELICOPTER.php. Retrieved 26-February-2013. 
  10. "SFO-Helicopter Airlines". Demand media. http://www.airliners.net/photo/SFO-Helicopter-Airlines/Sikorsky-S-62A/0090355/L/&sid=af9a82c5d71e842eca6850665addcd2d. Retrieved 26-February-2013. 
  11. "Aircraft on Display"National Naval Aviation Museum. Retrieved: 18 August 2012.
  12. "Aircraft Collection"USS ALABAMA BATTLESHIP. Retrieved: 18 August 2012.
  13. "Lis of Aircraft"American Helicopter Museum & Education Center. Retrieved: 18 August 2012.
  14. "Sikorsky HH-52A Seaguard" Mid-Atlantic Air Museum. Retrieved: 18 August 2012.
  15. "The Museum of Flight. Retrieved: 18 August 2012.
  16. "Sikorsky HH-52A (S-62A) 'Seaguard'"The New England Air Museum. Retrieved: 18 August 2012.
  17. "Sikorsky HH-52A Seaguard"Pima Air & Space Museum. Retrieved: 18 August 2012.
  18. "HH-52 Helicopter"Naval Air Station Wildwood Aviation Museum. Retrieved: 18 August 2012.
  19. http://www.airliners.net/photo/Philippines---Air/Sikorsky-(Mitsubishi)-S-62J/1645396/L/&sid=b34b952929a8b5fe686e976f39a545bc
  20. Taylor 1969, pp. 434–434.
  21. 21.0 21.1 21.2 Sikorsky Preflight Reference Cards
Bibliography
  • Taylor, John W. R.. Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1969-70. London:Jane's Yearbooks, 1969.

External linksEdit

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