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Sindhughosh-class submarine
INS Sindhughosh
INS Sindhughosh
Class overview
Name: Sindhughosh class
Operators:  Indian Navy
In commission: 1986–
Planned: 10
Completed: 10
Active: 9
Lost: 1
General characteristics
Type: Submarine
Displacement: 2,325 t (2,288 long tons) surfaced
3,076 t (3,027 long tons) submerged
Length: 72.6 m (238 ft 2 in)
Beam: 9.9 m (32 ft 6 in)
Draught: 6.6 m (21 ft 8 in)
Propulsion: 2 × diesel-electric motors, 3,650 hp (2,722 kW) each
1 × motor, 5,900 hp (4,400 kW)
2 × auxiliary motors, 204 hp (152 kW)
1 × economic speed motor, 130 hp (97 kW)
Speed: 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph) surfaced[verification needed]
17 knots (31 km/h; 20 mph) submerged[verification needed]
Range: 6,000 mi (9,700 km) at 7 kn (13 km/h; 8.1 mph) snorkeling
400 mi (640 km) at 3 kn (5.6 km/h; 3.5 mph) submerged
Test depth: 300 m (980 ft)
Complement: 53 (13 Officers)
Armament: • 9M36 Strela-3 (SA-N-8) SAM launcher
• Club-S (3M-54E) ASCM (after mid-life refit)
• Type 53-65 passive wake homing torpedo
• TEST 71/76 anti-submarine, active-passive homing torpedo
• 24 × DM-1 mines in lieu of torpedoes

Sindhughosh-class submarines are Kilo-class diesel-electric submarines in active service with the Indian Navy. Their names are in Sanskrit, but in their Roman-alphabet forms sometimes a final short -a is dropped.

The Sindhughosh submarines, designated 877EKM, were designed as part of Project 877, and built under a contract between Rosvooruzhenie and the Ministry of Defence (India).

The submarines have a displacement of 3,000 tonnes, a maximum diving depth of 300 meters, top speed of 18 knots, and are able to operate solo for 45 days with a crew of 53. The final unit was the first to be equipped with the 3M-54 Klub (SS-N-27) antiship cruise missiles with a range of 220 km.

Incidents[]

On 10 January 2008, the INS Sindhughosh collided with cargo ship MV Leeds Castle. The submarine is reported to have sustained superficial damage to its conning tower. As a result, the submarine was out of service for a month. The cargo ship was in restricted shallow waters.[1]

On 26 February 2010, a fire on board INS Sindhurakshak killed one sailor and injured two others. The fire was due to a defective battery.[2] On 14 August 2013 an explosion, followed by a fire, was reported to have occurred on the Sindhurakshak.[3] The Sindhurakshak sank in the dock.

INS Sindhuvijay has been upgraded with the hydro acoustical USHUS complex and the CCS-MK radio communications system.[4]

Ships of the class[]

Name Pennant Builder Homeport Commission Date Status Meaning of name
INS Sindhughosh S55 Sevmash,
Severodvinsk
30 April 1986 Refitted to project 08773 2002-2005 at Zvezdochka shipyard Battle-cry/rumour/report of the Sea
INS Sindhudhvaj S56 Sevmash 12 June 1987 Flag of the Sea
INS Sindhuraj S57 Sevmash 20 October 1987 Refitted to project 08773 1999-2001 at Zvezdochka shipyard King of the Sea
INS Sindhuvir S58 Sevmash 26 August 1988 Refitted to project 08773 1997-1999 at Zvezdochka shipyard Valiant of the Sea
INS Sindhuratna S59 Sevmash 22 December 1988 Refitted to project 08773 2001-2003 at Zvezdochka shipyard Jewel of the Sea
INS Sindhukesari S60 Sevmash 16 February 1989 Refitted to project 08773 1999-2001 at Zvezdochka shipyard Lion of the Sea[5]
INS Sindhukirti S61 Sevmash 4 January 1990 Undergoing refit to project 08773 from 2007 in her home base Vishakhapatnam Fame of the Sea
INS Sindhuvijay S62 Sevmash 18 March 1991 Refitted to project 08773 2005-2007 at Zvezdochka shipyard Victory of the Sea
INS Sindhurakshak S63 Sevmash 24 December 1997 Refitted to project 08773 09.08.2010-2012 at Zvezdochka shipyard.
Exploded and sank in Mumbai 14 August 2013
Protector of the Sea
INS Sindhushastra S65 Sevmash 19 July 2000 Weapon of the Sea[6]

References[]

External links[]

Gallery[]



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