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Smith & Wesson SW
Smith and Wesson Sigma SW9VE.JPG
S&W SW
Type Semi-automatic pistol
Place of origin United States
Production history
Designer Smith & Wesson
Designed 1993–1994
Manufacturer Smith & Wesson
Variants SW40F, SW9F, SW40C, SW9C, SW40V, SW9V, SW40E, SW9E, SW40VE, SW40GVE, SW40Ti, SW357V, SW9VE, SW9P, SW9G, SW380M, SW9M
Specifications
Weight 26 ounces (740 g) (SW40F, SW9F)
24 ounces (690 g) (SW40C, SW40V, SW40VE, SW40E. SW357V)
24 1/2 ounces (700 g) (SW9C, SW9V, SW9VE, SW9E, SW9G, SW9P)
20 ounces (SW40Ti)
Length 7 3/4 inches (197 mm) (SW40F, SW9F)
7 1/4 inches (184 mm) (SW40C, SW40V, SW40VE, SW40E, SW40Ti, SW357V SW9C, SW9V, SW9VE, SW9E, SW9G, SW9P)
Barrel length 4 1/2 inches (114 mm) (SW40F, SW9F)
4 inches (102 mm) (SW40C, SW40V, SW40VE, SW40E, SW357V, SW9C, SW9V, SW9VE, SW9E, SW9G, SW9P)
Width 1 1/3 inches (33 mm)
Height 5 1/2 inches (142 mm) (SW40F, SW9F)

Cartridge .40 S&W
.357 SIG
9×19mm Parabellum
.380 ACP (SW380M)
Action Short recoil
Feed system 16-round box magazine
17-round box magazine (SW9F)
15-round box magazine (SW40F, SW357V)
14-round box magazine
Sights Fixed 3-dot notch sights

The Smith & Wesson SD, formerly known as the Sigma, was Smith & Wesson's first venture into using synthetic materials in pistol construction, using high-strength polymer material for the frame. The pistol is similar to a Glock safe-action pistol in both its design and operation, leading to some controversy and speculation as to the legality of the pistol's patents.

Description[edit | edit source]

Created in 1994, the Sigma incorporates pre-set striker firing mechanism. It is available in both .40 S&W cartridge and 9×19mm Parabellum being one of the first pistols purpose-designed to handle the .40 S&W. Similar styled sub-compact designs in .380 ACP and 9×19mm were also manufactured. A limited number of these pistols were also chambered for the .357 SIG cartridge.[1]

Legality[edit | edit source]

The Sigma series pistols were so similar to the competing Glock pistols that Glock sued Smith & Wesson for patent infringement. The case was settled out of court in 1997, with S&W agreeing to make alterations to the Sigma design and pay an undisclosed amount to Glock.[2]

Former users[edit | edit source]

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

External links[edit | edit source]

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